Tagged: Suicide

Glaxo’s Last Mudslinging Act At The Stewart Dolin Paxil Trial..


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“….Next came the issue of Rothschild’s cozy relationship with GlaxoSmithKline. In the Dolin case alone, Rothschild has been paid approximately $165,000 for his testimony.

Rapoport pressed Rothschild further and asked him about previous cases where GSK has called him as an “expert” witness.

When asked how many times GSK has hired him as a witness in Paxil death cases, Rothschild couldn’t seem to count that high. “Going back 15 years, I can’t give you an exact number, but it’s probably in the neighborhood of 20 or 30.”…”

-Bob Fiddaman:

http://fiddaman.blogspot.ie/


Two weeks ago, I decided to take a blog-break due to some health issues which I need to try to attend to. I still intend to pull back from blogging, as blogging about this stuff can be exhausting at times, however I feel It’s important to highlight the Stewart Dolin Paxil induced suicide trial currently ongoing in the US.

It seems to me that Glaxo’s case in defending Paxil, has been more of a masterclass in mudslinging as opposed to a legitimate defense of their drug. They seem to think that if they hire every pharma-whore they can find available and get those pharma-whores to sling mud at Stewart Dolin’s character, then that will be enough to sway the jury that it was not Paxil which caused Stewart to kill himself.

Pretty pathetic on Glaxo’s part, in my opinion.

Bob Fiddaman has been covering the Dolin trial on his blog for a few weeks, and his last two posts show just how desperate Glaxo are to deny that Paxil (seroxat) can cause suicide and akathisia.

It is simply astounding how GSK can try to defend Paxil/Seroxat in court on the premise that Paxil doesn’t cause suicide or akathisa, while at the same time, they admit in their PIL’s (Patient information leaflets) that Paxil can induce suicidal thoughts/ideation, akathsia and changes in behavior etc.

You can’t have it both ways, but it seems that isn’t going to stop Glaxo from trying.

One of Glaxo’s so called ‘experts’ in the Dolin trial is Dr Anthony Rothschild. Rothschild has apparently been defending GSK’s Paxil/Seroxat in possible Paxil induced suicide cases for many years.

I wonder how much money Dr Rothschild has made over the last 15 years defending Paxil? If he got over 150,00 dollars for one appearance, and he has done 20 to 30, for Glaxo, then perhaps defending Paxil alone has made him a millionaire?

You’d have to wonder too, does Dr Rothchild care about the wellbeing of those prescribed SSRI’s like Paxil?, does he care about the truth of the side effects of these drugs seeing the light of day? or does he care more about the hundreds of thousands of dollars he receives per court appearance from GlaxoSmithKline? and the monetary grants and honoria he receives from the drug industry?

I think astute readers will come to their own conclusions about that.

Seroxat/Paxil does cause Akathisia, I experienced it myself, and so have many others. Paxil/Seroxat does cause suicidal behaviors, I experienced this too, and so have many others. GSK are proven liars, fraudsters, felons and criminals. Anyone who takes blood money from them- to defend their drugs in cases where their drugs have caused harm- does not have the public’s best interest at heart.

Furthermore, greedy doctors on a drug company’s pay-roll certainly don’t have their patients’ interests at heart.

Dr Rothschild (and those of his ilk) make an absolute mockery of the medical Hippocratic oath..

“First do no harm”..

See Fid’s post here for more

 

The Dolin Trial… Glenmullen Enters The Fray..


Thursday, March 30, 2017

Dolin Vs GSK – Glenmullen Nails It!

On Tuesday a series of video depositions were aired to the jury. Sadly, I have no access to the videos and cannot directly report on them. Thankfully, GSK’s lawyer, Todd Davis, has provided fabulous entertainment akin to a desperately sad clown. Yesterday Davis ineffectively cross-examined the plaintiff’s next expert witness, Dr. Joseph Glenmullen.

Dr. Glenmullen is yet another thorn in the side of GSK. He has previously served as expert witness in many Paxil lawsuits, and, just like Dr. David Healy, is disliked by GSK and their King &  Spalding attorneys. Both Glenmullen and Healy were subjected to GSK’s pre-trial circus in which GSK filed motion after motion arguing that these renowned doctors should not give evidence at this trial. GSK’s attempts were denied.

After yesterday, I can vividly see why GSK opposed Glenmullen as an expert. In short, Glenmullen ran circles around Davis. More on this further on down this blog post.

Glenmullen detailed Stewart Dolin’s medical notes and told the jury the akathisia Stewart experienced occurred the last time he was prescribed Paxil. This was six days before Stewart’s Paxil-induced death. During these six days, Stewart showed increased signs of agitation, just as he did when he was previously prescribed Zoloft years ago. In fact, when the Zoloft dose was increased, Stewart’s adverse drug reaction (akathisia) worsened. When Stewart stopped taking Zoloft, his agitation subsided. Sadly for Stewart and his survivors, when he last took Paxil his adverse drug reaction ended in death. Akathisia, as Glenmullen stated yesterday, is “a drug-induced reaction, a compulsion to kill yourself.” Glenmullen added that a death such as this is referred to “as a paroxetine-induced accident, not a suicide. It’s paroxetine. It’s the label that didn’t warn that is the cause.”

Regarding GSK’s supposed adult suicide warning on the Paxil labeling, Glenmullen clearly nailed it. Referring to the 2010 Black Box warning displayed in court, Glenmullen told the jury how there was explicit language that short-term studies did not show an increase in the risk of suicidality with antidepressants compared to sugar pills in adults beyond age 24. He also pointed out the sentence, “Depression and certain other psychiatric disorders are themselves associated with increases in risk of suicide.” He explained to the jury, “…What that tells me as a practicing psychiatrist is that if I’m treating a 57-year old patient and I put them on Paxil, Paxil couldn’t make them worse. Paxil couldn’t make them suicidal. It would be, and it says explicitly, their depression or other psychiatric condition.”

Glenmullen further noted the black box warning is “really bad” because it implies the suicide warning is just for children, ergo a doctor treating an adult could not warn about a potential risk of suicide because the labeling suggests there is only a suicidality risk among children taking Paxil.

The jury was informed that the labeling was written in such a way so that doctors would not only NOT know about the adult suicide risk, doctors would actually increase the dose because they would assume worsening of depression and/or new disturbing behaviors had nothing to do with Paxil.

Glenmullen added, “And here’s another dimension to it. If the patient gets worse and it might be the drug, what do you do? You take them off the drug to see. If they get worse and it couldn’t be the drug but it’s the depression, what do you do? You increase the drug, which is going to worsen the risk. So it’s very dangerous. And that’s why, in my opinion, it’s really this lack of a warning that’s responsible for his (Stewart Dolin’s) death.”

Glenmullen told the jury he is “100% certain” that “Mr. Dolin’s was a “paroxetine-induced, Paxil-label-induced death.”


Cross-examination by King & Spalding’s Resident Clown

As per his norm, Davis repeatedly tried but failed to discredit the witness. He attempted to catch out Glenmullen with answers Glenmullen provided in various testimonies, including testimony that was more than 11 years ago!

A spectator in the court told me, “You should have seen the spectacle created by GSK when it came time to do their cross.  They were so unorganized with their multiple binders that the jury started to laugh.”

Davis also went down the route of asking Glenmullen how much he was paid to give expert opinions in previous Paxil litigation. Leaves me wondering how much Todd Davis has been paid to defend one of the most controversial drugs in history. Further, I wonder whether he and his law team view their thousands of “settlements”as victory.

In what world is it viewed as a success to place gagging orders on families of Paxil victims so that the truth about the dangerous product is hidden?

Thus far, Davis has done a fine job of entertaining both spectators and jurors alike. Today’s Davis looks more like a sad clown than the smug clown who skipped into court three weeks ago. So, there you have it: King & Spalding attorneys seem to work well together if one considers their joint performance mere entertainment. Sad clown Davis and his jack-in-the-box sidekick, Andrew Bayman, will continue their lame cross-examination of Glenmullen today.

Bob Fiddaman

Bob Fiddaman Reports On The Glaxo Criminals…


http://fiddaman.blogspot.ie/2017/03/dolin-vs-gsk-day-8-get-to-point-todd.html?spref=tw

Tuesday, March 28, 2017

Dolin Vs GSK – Day 8 – Get to the Point, Todd!

The Todd Stance
 
Oh Todd, oh Todd, oh Todd,
you make us feel so weary.
Your questioning of Stewart’s doctor
really is quite dreary.
So, GSK’s warning letter
is the crux of your defence?
It’s not logical or rational;
it simply makes no sense.
You say you warned the doctors
of Paxil’s suicide risk.
Yet Andy Bayman denies this claim,
like a repeating compact disc.
Adults are perfectly safe, he states:
It’s just kids who should be warned.
But your former CEO confirms
it’s your duty to inform.
You can keep your fancy haircut, Todd,
and expensive Armani suit.
You can keep your sense of what’s right and wrong
in this wrongful death lawsuit.
You can keep your lack of due care
and misleading words of warning.
We know Paxil causes death, you see,
and leaves families deep in mourning.
Bob Fiddaman ~ 2017
Day 8 of the Dolin Vs GSK Paxil-induced suicide trial saw Stewart Dolin’s physician and long-time friend, Dr. Marty Sachman, take the stand.
Sachman was first questioned by David Rappaport, one of the attorneys representing Wendy Dolin (Stewart’s widow).
The jury heard more about Stewart Dolin, the man, and less about the fact that GlaxoSmithKline concealed Paxil’s propensity to induce suicidality. Sachman told the jury, “Stew was a very reserved, quiet, intelligent, loving man. I never heard him raise his voice over our 25-year relationship. We were like brothers. We spent weekends together, travel together. He was my closest friend. A loving person and a loving family man.” 
Sachman was also questioned about Stewart Dolin’s anxiety, which, according to the doctor, was a result of work-related issues. He told the jury that he never thought Stewart was depressed and that Stewart always responded to the treatment he gave him from 2005-2010. On each occasion, after Sachman prescribed Stewart drugs, he would warn him of the side effects and, once Stewart felt better, would wean him off the prescription.
Two days before Stewart’s Paxil-induced death, Sachman and Stewart attended a memorial service for the father of their mutual friend. Later that evening Sachman, Stewart and Wendy went to dinner together. Sachman was asked to describe what he remembered about Stewart that night. He answered, “His demeanor was, as usual, our conversation was as usual. He was calm.”
Sachman then recounted his “absolute shock” upon hearing the news of Stewart’s death. He told the jury, “I just think that we depend on honesty in reporting research and data. How can we treat people effectively and safely if we can’t depend on that?”
Rappaport then asked Sachman about the communication between pharmaceutical companies and doctors regarding drug labeling. Sachman’s answer, which King & Spalding objected to and was struck by the judge, highlighted Dr. Sachman’s feelings about being deceived:
 
“Well, you know, physicians, myself and millions of other physicians, every day try to protect people, try to help people and protect them. We rely on truth and honesty from pharmaceutical companies and to falsify information or hold back information is totally criminal. It affects the lives of our patients.”
It’s appropriate Sachman used the word ‘criminal’ given that GlaxoSmithKline have previously pled guilty to criminal charges. Therefore, GlaxoSmithKline are criminals.
Concluding his examining of the witness, David Rappaport asked Sachman about the tie and belt he was wearing. Sachman started to weep, sharing that they belonged to Stewart. Dr. Sachman wore them to “remember him today.”
Cross-examination by King & Spalding’s Todd Davis.
The cross-examination by Davis centered around GlaxoSmithKline’s “Dear Doctor Letters” sent out whenever GSK decides to share a problem with their products. Davis went over and over a series of these letters sent to Sachman. Sachman told Davis that he had, indeed, received these letters. Once again, King & Spalding tried to catch a witness by asking the same questions that were asked years ago during deposition. GSK’s attorneys futilely tried this tactic with Dr. David Healy and Dr. David Cross earlier in the trial.
Davis droned on about the “Dear Doctor Letters” and whether Sachman read them. Finally, an understandably frustrated Judge Hart interjected and admonished Davis, “You’re covering the same ground…over and over again now, Mr. Davis…Let’s not go over the same thing over and over again.”
Davis, however, continued to go over the “Dear Doctor Letters,” and the judge again interjected, “Mr. Davis, the document speaks for itself, and the doctor has accepted it. I don’t see any reason to read the document to him and ask him whether he agrees or disagrees.” 
 
King & Spalding’s “finest” then switched gears, inquiring about Sachman’s prescription of Levaquin (an antibiotic) to Stewart Dolin. Davis asked Sachman if he had read the Levaquin warnings regarding the drug’s propensity to cause adverse effects including suicidal acts or thoughts.
It’s good to see Levaquin manufacturers use the appropriate suicidal acts in their warning label. This term is surely more understandable than the intentionally ambiguous “emotional lability” term GSK prefers. I can’t help but wonder whether Davis would be equally concerned if his spouse consumed a product that states it can cause “emotional labilty” as he would if the warning listed “suicidal acts?”
Bizarrely, Davis next asked Sachman if he was aware Stewart’s widow and children had taken trips in and out of the US since Stewart’s death? Davis likely knows this is irrelevant, but shamelessly asked anyway in a lame attempt to imply Stewart’s widow and children couldn’t possibly be mourning Stewart’s Paxil-induced death if the family has traveled in the last six years. An appropriate question on my mind is “Does Davis take trips in and outside the US after settling cases for GSK in which innocent consumers have died?”
Davis finished his cross-examination, and I presume the jury and judge were glad to have a break from Davis’ tedious repetition. Davis is largely ineffective; GSK might want to reexamine their legal fund investment in Davis when GSK is, no doubt, embroiled in future wrongful death lawsuits.
David Rappaport – Re-direct
I won’t go into too much detail regarding the re-direct because the following question and answer seemed to undue Davis’ performance:
Q. Have you seen in any of the labels that you’ve ever seen from GSK about Paxil any reference to the fact that they had a suicide signal from attempts and suicides in the initial clinical trials that was of the magnitude of 7 to 8 times greater risk than similarly-depressed people on placebo?
A. I certainly have not.
Before leaving the stand, Dr. Marty Sachman told the jury, “I’d like to say that in the midst of all of this attempted confusion of the real issue here, if it was clear that this drug had a higher risk of causing suicide in the age group Stewart Dolin was in, I would have never prescribed it.”
Three doctors have now taken the stand:  All have stated if they had known about the increase in suicidality and behavior in adults taking Paxil they would have never prescribed it.
Your move, Todd!
The trial continues today with a series of video depositions that, sadly, I won’t have access to unless they are made public.
Bob Fiddaman.

Bob Fiddaman’s Latest Post From The Dolin Trial…


http://fiddaman.blogspot.ie/2017/03/dolin-vs-gsk-day-6-ass-kicking-semantics.html?spref=tw

Thursday, March 23, 2017

Dolin Vs GSK – Day 6 – Ass Kicking Semantics

ass kicking

To be beaten senseless because you definitely deserve it.

semantics
the branch of linguistics and logic concerned with meaning.


The plaintiff examination of former FDA Medical Advisor, Dr. David Cross, finished today. Cross, who was examined by Brent Wisner of Baum Hedlund, read from a document shown on the screen to the jury. The paper was published in J Clin Psychiatry and authored by, amongst others, John E. Kraus, an employee of GlaxoSmithKline. The published article, ‘Meta-analysis of efficacy and treatment-emergent suicidality in adults by psychiatric indication and age subgroup following initiation of paroxetine,’ tries to play down the risk of Paxil-induced adult suicide. Further, the paper claimed that there was no difference in suicidality among patients who took paroxetine and those who took a placebo.

Finalizing his questions to Dr. Ross, Brent Wisner informed the jury that the article was actually written in 2008. Bayman, King & Spalding’s resident jack-in-the-box retorted that it was 2011, a year after Stewart Dolin died. Bayman seemed confident and had a smug look on his face at the thought of getting one over a prosecuting attorney. The smug look was wiped from his face by Wisner when Wisner informed Bayman–and the jury–that the paper was submitted to the journal in 2008 and published in 2011. This was two years before Stewart Dolin’s Paxil-induced death. Bayman’s jack-in-the-box spring lost its bounce as he slumped back down in his chair licking his wounds like a scolded schoolboy.

I do love to see Brent Wisner in action, and it is even more fun to see Wisner kicking GSK’s ass.

King & Spalding’s cross-examination of Wendy Dolin’s expert witness, Dr. David Cross, commenced today. It was merely a game of semantics, blame shifting and one person (Bayman) trying futilely to catch another in contradiction.

Andrew Bayman once again was in charge of the calvary, his sole mission being to undo all the data Dr. Cross previously shared with the jury.
Did Bayman succeed?

Hardly. It seemed a junior-league attempt to try and trip up Dr. Cross regarding a deposition he gave more than two years ago. It was also an effort to try to show the jury that, despite all the evidence showing Paxil has a 9-fold increase in inducing suicidality in adults, GSK is not responsible for clearly communicating this life-threatening information to healthcare professionals and the public.

Bayman kicked off by trying to discredit the credentials of Dr. Cross.

“Are you a pharmacologist?”, Bayman asked.

“No.” Dr. Cross replied.

“Are you an epidemiologist?” Bayman asked.

“No.” Dr. Cross replied.

Bayman, whose team can’t seem to defend the statistics previously shown at trial regarding the number of adults endangered by Paxil, was trying to convince the jury that Dr. Cross wasn’t qualified to provide evidence regarding FDA rules and label regulations.

It left me wondering if Glaxo’s former CEO, JP Garnier, would ever be asked if he were a criminologist. To my knowledge, the Monty Burns look-a-like holds no Ph.D. in criminology, yet, under his guidance, GSK committed various crimes which they have already plead guilty to committing.

Indeed, Bayman himself has defended GSK’s nefarious activities on countless occasions, as have the law firm for whom he works. Does this make Bayman and his fellow co-workers qualified experts in septal heart defects, homicide, and addiction, all of which have previously been the subject of King & Spalding trials regarding Paxil use?

Bayman also went down the tired road of ‘It wasn’t Paxil, it was the underlying condition.’ A line we hear on a daily basis from pharmaceutical companies defending the latest prescription drug-induced lawsuits.

Yesterday the jury were shown that Paxil labeling does not mention the suicide risk in adults. They were also shown that there is little or no explanation of the word ‘Akathisia’ that accompanies the patient information leaflet for Paxil.

Bayman argued that the word ‘Akathisia’ is in the labeling. Maybe so, but who, exactly, knows what akathisia means, particularly when the medical term remains ambiguously undefined, as GSK wants it. There is no mention on the label that Akathisia often creates suicidal thoughts and actions. Instead, the SSRI class labeling states akathisia is ‘motor restlessness’ – a vague description for a prescription-drug induced condition that often causes suicide!

Despite there being a 9-fold increase of suicidality in adults taking Paxil, and that GSK has known this for 25 years, there is no mention of this in today’s Paxil label. Bayman glossed over this by deflecting the blame to the FDA. He claimed the FDA have responsibility for the language on the labeling, ergo, it’s not GSK’s fault, it’s the FDA’s fault. In any event, Bayman claims that GSK tried to change the labeling. Perhaps this might be true, yet, oddly Bayman has shown the jury no proof that GSK ever attempted to petition the FDA to communicate the real suicidality risks Paxil causes. Even if GSK did petition the FDA to correct the Paxil label, GSK apparently then sat back and did nothing after the FDA did not amend the label despite having a legal, moral and ethical duty warn consumers of the real Paxil-created risks. Even GSK’s former CEO, JP Garnier, admitted this moral responsibility in a video deposition shown the jury last week.

Garnier said under oath, and I quote, “…there is a legal right for us to go directly to the public.”

Evidence here.

So, Bayman trying to convince the jury the suicide warning was down to the FDA contradicts what the top boss at GlaxoSmithKline says.
A strange defence, unless of course Bayman thinks JP Garnier was lying under oath?
Garnier lying? Surely not!
The trial continues tomorrow.
From this point I’ll be giving periodic updates and not daily ones.

More Dolin Trial Bombshells: Former FDA Offical Testifies That Paxil Is Not Safe And Doesn’t Work!…


“…David Ross. The former FDA Medical Advisor was asked if he prescribed Paxil to his patients.

Amid the objections from King & Spalding’s Andrew Bayman, he answered,

“No. I don’t believe that it works and I don’t believe that it’s safe.”….


Well, well, it seems that as the days go by more and more shocking revelations come out from the Stewart Dolin ‘Paxil Induced Suicide’ Trial in the US…

GSK… you evil bastards…

See Bob Fiddaman’s new post for more:

http://fiddaman.blogspot.ie/2017/03/dolin-vs-gsk-89-suicide-increase-for.html


Wednesday, March 22, 2017

Dolin Vs GSK – 8.9 Suicide Increase For Adult Paxil Users

Day 5 – Dolin Vs GSK Paxil Induced Adult Suicide – Chicago.

There was a startling revelation today in the Dolin Vs. GSK trial: Attorneys representing widow Wendy Dolin showed the ratio of Paxil-induced suicidality in adults is a staggering 8.9.  It is not 6.7, as previously claimed and reported by Glaxo. The 6.7 figure is astoundingly high in itself, but the 8.9 ratio is flabbergasting!

Plaintiff witness, Dr. David Ross, said this figure is ‘astounding.’ What you should remember here is that GSK’s 1989 drug application for Paxil said the suicidality odds ratio was 2.6.

Over the years as GSK’s lies were uncovered and more bodies were buried because of Paxil, GSK later changed the Paxil-induced suicide rate to 6.7. But today the world knows the actual Paxil-induced suicidality figure for adults is 8.9. This number is almost a nine-fold increase in adult Paxil patients experiencing suicidal thoughts, suicidal thinking and completed suicide–thoughts that are created by akathisia and other adverse reactions to Paxil and not by any underlying pre-existing condition.

Today at the trial, expert witness, Dr. David Ross, who worked for the FDA for ten years, testified extensively. While working at the FDA, Dr. Ross was responsible for reviewing new drug applications (NDA’s), i.e., he oversaw the statistics.

His evidence started with 6 points about GSK’s responsibilities (or lack of…)

1. Paxil is associated with an increased risk of suicidal behavior in adults beyond the age of 24.

2. GSK was not upfront about Paxil’s suicidal behavior risk.

3. In 2010, GSK had the ultimate responsibility for the Paxil label. GSK was responsible for ensuring the Paxil label did not contain any false, misleading, or inaccurate information about safety.

4. Federal regulations required GSK to warn doctors that Paxil induces adult suicidal behavior, starting in 1992.

5. GSK could have warned doctors by changing the Paxil label. There is no evidence the FDA would have stopped GSK from issuing a Paxil-specific warning in the non-class labeling sections. In fact, the FDA specifically invited GSK to discuss such changes.

6. GSK did not warn doctors of the true Paxil-induced suicidal behavior risks for adults beyond the age of 24.

Dr. Ross further reiterated to the jury what David Healy previously stated: that the responsibility for accurate drug labeling lies with the product manufacturer and not with the FDA. Dr. Ross added, “…the FDA does not do drug trials, we only know what we are shown.” He added, “You have to rely on the drug company.” He also informed the jury that the FDA’s annual budget is $1.3 billion, most of which comes from drug companies.

Another striking statement Ross shared with the jury was, “The FDA is in charge of enforcing the law, and GSK is in charge of following the law.”

Today’s evidence clearly shows that GSK has not followed the letter of the law enforced by the FDA.

Attorney Brent Wisner from Baum Hedlund asked Dr. Ross if he thought GSK’s label regarding adult suicide was adequate. Dr. Ross answered, “No.” and further added, “It was false and misleading and remains so today.”

Ross also told the jury that if he saw a nearly 9-fold increase in suicide in a drug (any drug) that he “Would not prescribe the drug.” In fact, Ross would categorize a 9-fold increase of any drug as a “frequent adverse event on labeling.”

He also told the jury that the term “Emotional lability” that GSK used instead of suicidality, “conceals what is really going on.”

Remarkably, two GSK employees, along with a third author who received funding and/or similar perks from GSK, published a medical journal paper stating Paxil actually reduced suicide in adults. Ross told the jury that he believed this published paper which contains obvious statistical errors should be retracted. The published article, “Reduction of suicidal thoughts with paroxetine in comparison with reference antidepressants and placebo”, by Montgomery, Dunner, and Dunbar was then used by GSK reps to promote the safety of Paxil in adult patients to prescribing doctors, even though GSK knew it was the complete opposite!

Indeed, it was a very bad day for GSK. The standard “Objection!” was lamely shouted out by King & Spalding’s resident Jack-in-the-box, Andrew Bayman, more times than I care to recall. The majority of his objections were overruled by the Honorable Judge Hart.

I’ve long been a critic of both the British and American drug regulators (the MHRA and FDA). Despite ten years of successful blogging, I’m never too old to learn something new, even when the new information is quite tragic: Today I, and the jury learned that drug companies such as GSK hold medical regulators by the balls. Drug companies provide information (to include false data from faulty clinical trials) and medical regulators have to accept drug company information as the truth. GSK should expect ramifications from global regulators after today’s evidence. An almost 9-fold increase in suicidal behavior in adults taking Paxil is appalling, particularly when we know that, for years, GSK continues to claim there is no causal association between suicide and adults taking Paxil.

This lopsided relationship has terrible ramifications for mental health authorities and suicide nonprofits who unconcernedly take drug company hush money. For years both have claimed antidepressants are a safe and effective treatment for a variety of possible ailments (anxiety, OCD, adult depression, e.tc.) A nearly 9-fold increase in suicidality strongly suggests that both mental health and mental health nonprofits have been duped by the pharmaceutical industry, along with prescribing doctors, medical regulators, and an unsuspecting public.

Just think folks: GSK even tried to get a license for Paxil to be prescribed to children after they knew of the Paxil-induced suicide increases in adults!

Nice ethical company, huh?

I’ll leave the last words to today’s witness, David Ross. The former FDA Medical Advisor was asked if he prescribed Paxil to his patients. Amid the objections from King & Spalding’s Andrew Bayman, he answered, “No. I don’t believe that it works and I don’t believe that it’s safe.”

Trial continues tomorrow.

For now, it’s time for a Guinness, in honour of Stewart Dolin.

Bob Fiddaman.
In Chicago.

Dolin Vs GSK

Dolin v GSK – Opening Arguments

Dolin Vs GSK – Day Two – “Jack-In-The-Box”

Dolin vs GSK – Healy ‘Rocks Da House’

Dolin Vs GSK – JP Garnier Video Deposition

Dolin Vs GSK – The Dunbar Tape

Dolin Vs GSK – Day 4 – Slam Dunk

Leonie Reports From The Stewart Dolin Paxil/Seroxat Suicide Trial..


https://leoniesblog.com/2017/03/19/dolin-v-smithkline-beecham-corp/

GSK’s Dirty Little Secret

Stewart
Dolin v SmithKline Beecham

So, myself and my friend Stephanie were in Chicago this week. We had traveled across the Atlantic to hear the opening arguments of Dolin v. Smithkline Beecham Corp (now GlaxoSmithKline – GSK). For more background to this case, see here.

We arrived straight into an unprecedented weather event, Storm Stella – described in the media as a weather bomb, having undergone bombogenesis (haven’t a clue either). Thus, while we were a little worried that the trial might be postponed, we were more concerned with the liklihood of two Irish females freezing to death. However, despite hitting a cool minus-8, with some pretty bizarre white-out conditions, we survived and the trial went ahead as planned (with the Hon. William T. Hart presiding).

This case centers on Wendy Dolin, the plaintiff, alleging that her husband’s death in 2010 was drug-induced and that GSK failed to warn of the increased risk of suicide in older adults taking the antidepressant Paroxetine. Her lawyers, Baum Hedlund, contend that GSK hid a ‘dirty little secret’ – that the drug can cause akathisia, often coded under the innocuously-sounding ‘inner turmoil’. However, this drug-induced condition is far from harmless and injury to oneself and/or others, can quickly follow. Furthermore, as alleged in this case, it can often prove fatal; see here.

At the time of his death, Stewart Dolin was 57 and was a corporate lawyer with ReidSmith. While suffering from work-related stress, he was prescribed Paroxetine by his physician, Dr. Martin Sachman – a family friend. Paroxetine is perhaps more widely recognised by its trade name Paxil, or Seroxat in Europe. Six days after being prescribed a generic form of the drug, Stewart died by jumping in front of a Chicago train. He was affluent, well-liked by colleagues and well-loved by his family. Per one of his colleagues “Stu Dolin was a close personal friend, valued colleague and a great leader in our firm. His energy and spirit benefited everyone around him. The lawsuit claims that GSK failed to adequately warn doctors (including Dr. Sachman) of the increased risk of suicidal behavior in adults. Indeed, GSK’s opening argument proclaimed that ‘Paxil does not cause suicide’. That was then contradicted by GSK’s very own literature, where a 2006 analysis showed a 6.7 times greater risk of suicidal behaviour in adults (of all ages) taking Paxil, over placebo.

Doctor David Healy was on the stand for 2 full-days, as an expert witness for the plaintiff. His testimony included an account of how GSK had hidden suicide events from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), thus manipulating the suicide-ratio and effectively hiding the bodies. Explaining drug-induced suicides to the jury, his world-leading expert status in psychopharmacology was unquestionable. No doubt, GSK ‘s legal team will attempt to annihilate that particular status before he exposes any more ‘dirty little secrets’. Like how 100% of Paxil consumers will experience sexual dysfunction – another life changing adverse-effect he mentioned in court, and another one not precisely admitted to by the manufacturers.

Not surprisingly, GSK’s lawyers (King and Spalding), became increasingly apoplectic, interjecting every few minutes with their objections, which proved fascinating in itself. The last hour before the court adjourned for the week-end proved to be very enlightening indeed, with their team looking increasingly agitated. Doctor Healy was then asked some questions by the plaintiff’s legal team:

(1) Do you have any doubt that Paxil can cause suicide? He answered ‘No’.

(2) In your opinion, did GSK warn doctors of the increased risk of suicide in adults? Again he answered ‘No’.

There seemed little doubt to anyone listening that Paxil could cause Akathisia and/or a drug-induced suicide. However, no doubt GSK will have many experts to refute that, whatever the evidence has shown. Having listened to this week’s testimonies, there is absolutely no doubt in my mind that Steward Dolin’s death was induced by the Paxil he was taking in the final 6 days of his life. However, the trial will most-likely go on for another few weeks when the jury will ultimately decide. Sadly, as is normal in these legal cases, every aspect of Wendy and Stewart’s private life will be publicly torn to shreds, with their every move dissected to try and put doubt into the jury’s mind. Whatever the outcome, Stewart’s wife Wendy, is one very, very brave lady.

Clearly, GSK’s lawyers are particularly polished and well used to court proceedings. That said, following the jurys’ retirement for the weekend, there was a last minute crucial objection from their legal team. One of their lawyers raised a final grievance – that a lawyer for the plaintiff’s side had the cheek to say ‘have a good weekend’ to the jury. Seriously? Drug induced suicide was the issue here and this farewell gesture caused offence to GSK’s legal team?

Anyway, if you would like to see the three video depositions that were shown to the court; they were uploaded yesterday. You really don’t need to be a body language expert to determine how truthful these GSK experts are being – or not.

GSK Biostatistician John Davies Deposition in Paxil Suicide Case:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C9_WvgqYkag
Former Glaxo Executive Jeffrey Dunbar Deposition in Paxil Suicide Case:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K5OL0DC4xQE
Damning Testimony from Former GlaxoSmithKline CEO Jean-Pierre Garnier in Paxil Suicide Case: https://www.youtube.com/watch?

More Damning Evidence About Seroxat/Paxil And Suicidality …


Brilliant reporting from Bob Fiddaman at the Stewart Dolin ‘Paxil Induced Suicide’ trial in the US.

More damning evidence that Paxil/Seroxat is a drug that simply should never have been on the market in the first place…


 

Friday, March 17, 2017

Dolin vs GSK – Healy ‘Rocks Da House’

This is complex, this is time consuming. Two days of evidence presented to the jury, judge and layperson (me included).

Cut through the endless amount of questions (they always lead to the truth where GSK are concerned) – and you will see, through Healy’s evidence, the reasons why this case is a “Slam Dunk” for Dolin et al and why GSK’s hot shot law team bounce up and down crying ‘objection’ at every given opportunity.

Objection! Because they don’t want the jury to know about their previous ghostwritten articles.

Objection! Because they don’t want the jury to know about GSK’s previous fine of $3billion (yes, that’s billion, fine for promoting Paxil off-label to kids.

Objection! Because they don’t want the jury to know about the Paxil withdrawal issue because, “it’s a case that is on-going against them in the UK) – Forget the case of Paxil withdrawal they’ve already settled with over 3,000 plaintiffs in the US, right?

Objection! Because they don’t want the jury to know they lied about the fact that Paxil was safe for kids.

They even objected to Wendy Dolin’s attorneys for wishing the jury had a great weekend, or words to that effect!

What I have witnessed here in Chicago is a law team representing an abhorrent company, the law team being made up of men and women (think about the birth defects Paxil has caused – I mean, their law team has a woman of child bearing years!)

Bayman (King & Spalding) also asked the Judge to reiterate to the jury that they should not “Google” about Paxil or the case in question. Yeah, right, Heaven forbid the jury stumble upon GSK’s abhorrent record and/or disregard for human life, right?

I honestly don’t know how a team with kids, siblings, wives, husbands or any other family members for that matter, can sit there and defend a drug (Paxil) that has caused so much heartache for families over the years. Are they devoid of any compassion, any empathy, any common sense?

My thoughts are, to some, irrelevant – Am I biased? Maybe? With a whole bunch of lawyers sitting on one side of a courtroom defending a drug that, probably, none of them have taken or, none of their loved ones have taken, I feel like I’m banging my head against a brick wall.

King & Spalding’s main two men, Andrew Baymen and Todd (snigger at a name that befits a child) Davis, seem devoid of any compassion and/or rationale – they don’t want to talk about ghostwritten articles, they don’t want to talk about the $3 billion dollar fine their defendant got for the illegal promotion of off-label practises of many drugs, including Paxil. They don’t want to talk about the withdrawal problems that Paxil can cause, and they don’t want to talk about how the company they are defending put children and adolescents at risk when they sent out their work force to promote the safety and efficacy of Paxil.

For these reasons, I am de-humanized from that table (in the courtroom) that represents this truly abhorrent company. A table of psychopaths or people who just want the right to pay their monthly bills? – Psychopaths is a pretty good description, given that they know, and have  known of Paxil’s severe side effects for many, many years.

Healy’s expert opinion leaves me wondering if the jury want/need to hear anything more. He told the jury how…

  • In 2006, the FDA knew about the increased suicidal risk on Paxil.
  • GSK reported that there was no risk f Paxil induced suicide in 1999.
  • GSK showed 6 suicide ttempts on placebo,when the actual figure was 1, in fact it was zero!
  • GSK claimed that Paxil did NOT cause suicide and this convinced prescribing Dr’s to prescribe Paxil.

Let’s just take a look at some evidence aired today…these are from GSK’s own internal documents. The public, or those who had or have been prescribed Paxil never got to hear about this…

– 50 year-old female patient who became suicidal on Paxil (GSK’s own admission, probable cause!)
– 55 year-old male patient who showed “unrest and agitation” – patient was put on Paxil for 3 days when problems began, Paxil was stopped – patient felt better.
– 59 year-old male – experienced ‘restlessness’, visual disturbances – Patient recovered one day after Paxil was removed!
– 32 year-old male, on day one of Paxil treatment, developed severe akathisia – patient was confused throughout study.

Healy reminded the jury that GSK’s stance was that Paxil, a drug that was used to treat anxiety and Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) actually made, some people develop symptoms that it was, originally, meant to treat!

Many exhibits were aired that further showed how GSK hid the suicide link with Paxil. In fact, it was learned, GSK’s own re-analysis of Paxil (2006) showed an increase of 6.7 patients in Paxil adult patents. (the increase 6.7 times the greater likelihood one who takes Paxil will develop suicidality)

Oh, by the way, Stewart Dolin was 57.

Healy told the court that, based on his own clinical experience, Paxil was the most potent and problematic of all the SSRIs on the market. He also informed the jury that, as a clinician himself, he does not prescribe Paxil and added that the hospital where he works does not have Paxil on their list as a possible medication to treat a psychiatric illness.

To back up the evidence, the jury was shown an email to GSK’s marketing guru, Barry Brand. The email focused on Paxil’s suicide problem.

King & Spalding’s, Andrew Bayman, played his ‘Jack-in-the Box’ routine throughout the day. His sidekick, from King & Spalding, Todd Davis, remained in the wings being as quiet as a mouse – strange because it is “Todd” who has targeted the kids of Wendy Dolin leading up to this litigation. Is Todd married? Does Todd have a regular girlfriend/boyfriend? Does he have children of his own? Is his blinking affliction down to the overuse of a psychotropic medication? Who knows?

That’s poor show from me, I shouldn’t mock the afflicted…then again, these schmucks have defended the indefensible for years – they’ve shown no remorse when people have gone on to kill themselves whilst on Paxil – why would they when they are earning vast amounts of money (by the hour) defending GSK?

GSK are King & Spalding’s cash cow. They tried, through objection, to hide the truth about Paxil to the jury. They failed on a grand-scale.

Most damning, for today at least, was Healy’s claim that he is one of the only people to have read the ‘raw data’ regarding Paxil and suicide, raw data that leaves him firmly believing Paxil can induce suicidality in adults, something that GSK have, for years, denied.

Healy also spoke how GSK used the term ’emotional lability’ when reporting suspected suicidality in clinical trials, a term that would have made, even him, think there was no problem with Paxil. A term that would have made most prescribing doctors think that there was no suicide problem with Paxil!

Churlish.

GSK’s table of attorneys look slick. One aging bald-headed guy even approached the judge at the end of today’s proceedings to complain that Wendy Dolin’s law team had wished the jury a “nice weekend” as they were dismissed.

Objection, objection, objection.

They seem like a stuck record. A team of misfits whose only mission is to blame everything but Paxil opting, instead, to blame the patients for having an ‘underlying illness’.

The questioning of Healy by Dolin’s attorney’s finished today. He will be cross examined by King & Spalding on Monday.

I’ll be there. Stewart Dolin will be there in spirit.

More on the past two days events tomorrow night, in particular evidence that shows how a witness called for GSK in this trial showed how another unrelated drug caused two patients akathisia and they ‘jumped’ to their death.

Stewart Dolin (57)  ‘jumped’ in front of a train because Paxil caused psychosis and akathisia, an adverse drug reaction that is so horrible, death can be seen as a welcome alternative.

Bob Fiddaman.

Dolin back stories.

The Fiddaman Blog…


http://fiddaman.blogspot.ie/2017/03/glaxo-dont-want-jury-to-see-paxils.html

Glaxo Don’t Want Jury To See Paxil’s “illegitimate” Suicide Figures

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Yet another objection by GlaxoSmithKline in the eagerly awaited Dolin Vs GlaxoSmithKline Paxil induced suicide trial, set to begin next Tuesday in Chicago.

GSK, it appears, are now bitchin’ about evidence submitted by Wendy Dolin, the widow of Stewart Dolin, that shows how (in a previous trial) the testimony of former FDA employee Dr. Martin Brecher showed that stopping or discontinuing Paxil led to undesirable side effects. (In re Paxil, Case No. CV-01 07937 MRP (C.D. Cal.))

GSK’s objection states…

“Permitting Plaintiff Wendy Dolin to introduce Dr. Brecher’s testimony would be highly and unfairly prejudicial because the jury would be left with the incorrect impression that FDA determined that GSK’s reporting of suicides and suicide attempts in the Paxil NDA was “scientifically illegitimate.”

During Brecher’s original deposition, taken almost 14 years ago, it was learned that Brecher, whilst employed at the FDA, told Glaxo (then SmithKline Beecham) officials that “Paxil was dangerously addictive.” (1)

Glaxo are also objecting to this evidence being submitted in the Dolin trial because, “…the prior case involved a different subject matter than this case.”

Brecher, whilst under oath was also questioned about the suicide figures relating to patients taking Paxil. Here’s part of that deposition. Keyword here is “illegitimate.”

You’ll note that GSK’s attorney’s cite the same thing when Brecher is being asked questions that forms part of their objection in the Dolin case, ergo “It has absolutely nothing to do with this litigation.”

Q (by Mr. Farber): Now, you had the NDA that was submitted in November of ’89 and you took over the job in January of ’90, correct. So you had had – this is prior to the Teicher article now in January by month at least and the NDA had been submitted two months earlier. That NDA had suicide tables and data; did it not?

A: Yes.

Q: And did you through a matter of course in your regular routine review that suicide data?

A: I believe I did.

[Objection and colloquy omitted]

Q: So the data on suicide that you had when the NDA – let’s basically — That will be Exhibit 15.
[Colloquy omitted]

Q: Take a look at that for a minute. Ready?

A: Uh-humm.

Q: Now this table Roman numeral 11.21 talks about attempted suicides and overdoses, Worldwide Data. And at the bottom it indicates the Par safety summary of 10 November of 1989. And you’ll notice up in the right-hand corner of the Worldwide Data that it has all the population that we talked about earlier that you believed I was telling you the truth and I am, the one that says 2,963 under Paroxetine, 1,151 and 554 respectively for placebo; do you see that?

A: Uh-humm.

Q: Okay. Now, here we have attempted suicides on the top line that are further broken down into drug overdose and I’ll save you the time by figuring this out and it’s to their benefit anyway, so the drug overdose category is within the top category, it’s not – it’s not in addition to, it’s a subset of attempted suicides. And my question is the asterisk of two overdoses during the placebo run-in, you see the asterisk on the side, and of the overdoses, attempted suicide, two were – occurred during the run-in period. Let me ask you this: Based on your procedures at FDA – first of all, let – let me back up a minute. Based on your procedures at the FDA, what is a run-in period?

A: Prior to randomization subjects are discontinued from their old medication and given placebo usually for about a week, sometimes shorter.

Q: And how about wash-out, same?

A: That — that period also washes out their previous medication.

Q: So the terms are effectively synonymous for the purposes of …

A: (No verbal response.)

Q: Okay, now, based on FDA procedure and I’ll even elevate that to scientific procedure that you understood scientific procedure to be when you were at the FDA, is it scientifically legitimate to count a suicidal act occurring during wash-out and run-in to the placebo count?

[GSK COUNSEL]: Object to the form of the question. It has absolutely nothing to do with this litigation.

MR. FARBER: You’re going to see a connection if you’re patient here.

A: No, because everybody got placebo.

Q: So it’s scientifically illegitimate way to count, correct?

A: Yeah.

So, it appears that the current crop of Glaxo attorneys involved in defending Paxil in a suicide trial don’t want this evidence seen by a jury, just as the old crop of Glaxo attorneys didn’t want the jury in a Paxil addiction case to see evidence of Paxil induced suicide.

Begs the question; what exactly do Glaxo want the jury to see, just their evidence? A case of having their cake and eating it, perhaps?

The Paxil addiction lawsuit was settled out of court, over 3,000 plaintiffs received a compensatory award (figure unknown)

In the UK, consumers of Paxil (known as Seroxat) have been waiting almost 10 years to find out if they can press ahead and sue GlaxoSmithKline with regard to severe adverse reactions caused by Seroxat. In a recent pre-trial judgment the UK Plaintiffs were told that the outcome of the class action in the USA has no relevance to the UK cases. Glaxo had previously objected that the UK Courts did not need to know this. (2)

A strange judgment given that the relevance is in the word ‘Withdrawal’. Nonetheless, the UK consumers still battle on.

Opening arguments in the Dolin trial commence Tues, March 14 in Chicago. I’ll be writing daily reports on the events.

Bob Fiddaman.

(1) “Paxil was dangerously addictive.”
(2) SANDRA BAILEY & OTHERS Vs GLAXOSMITHKLINE (UK) LIMITED 01/03/2017

Doin v GSK back stories.

Mefloquine: A Psychotropic Medication by Dr. Remington Nevin


http://www.theaustralian.com.au/news/inquirer/drug-trial-a-test-of-ethics/news-story/ea5c10645fdaa5b5ec6f310bc3a82006

“…In Bougainville and Timor, army medical officers also prescribed a drug known as tafenoquine to 1512 troops, even though it had not — and still has not — been approved for use by Australian authorities.

A series of allegations have now been made about the ethics of these trials and the impact they may have had on the mental health of the participants.

One serving army officer who took mefloquine, Major Stuart McCarthy, alleges the trials were “manifestly unethical” because officers compelled soldiers to take the drug without properly warning of the risks.

He’s supported by a US expert who believes the ADF trials were “deeply unethical”...”

Interesting video about the dodgy controversial Malaria drug ‘Mefloquine’ (Lariam) by Dr. Remington Nevin.

Mefloquine has been harming many tens of thousands of people for decades (particularly soldiers) and there are currently several investigations and legal cases in various countries across the globe about its dangers…

GSK are currently trialing their own Malaria drug with similar qualities to Mefloquine, called, Tafenoquine (it’s of the same class).

Tafenoquine has already been considered ‘possibly more toxic than Mefloquine’…

 

See The International Mefloquine Veterans Alliance for more on this..

https://imvalliance.org/2016/07/06/loren-ries-mefloquine-tafenoquine-and-lariam-oh-my/

 

http://www.counterpunch.org/2014/04/08/a-nightmare-drug-military-suicides-and-killings/

 

“…As a cloud grows over mefloquine, there is both good and bad news. The good news is in 2013, the Surgeon General’s Office of the Army Special Operations Command told commanders and medical workers that soldiers who have been thought to be suffering from PTSD or other psychological problems or even faking mental impairment may actually be mefloquine victims. The bad news is a new malaria drug developed at Reed during the same time period as mefloquine called tafenoquine is now fast tracking toward FDA approval. Jeanne Lese and Dr. Remington Nevin worry that the new drug has not been adequately tested for the same types of neurotoxic effects seen with mefloquine and that it will become mefloquine 2.0…”

 

 

Was George Michael Addicted To Anti-Depressants? (and trying to wean off them?)


One of George Michael’s lovers today reveals how the tormented singer confessed to him that he was desperately addicted to anti-depressants.

Carlos Arturo Ortiz believes the superstar may have killed himself after telling him he was deeply unhappy.


He said: “George’s death knocked me sideways, although it didn’t surprise me. I found him a lovely down-to-earth man, but also a very melancholic person who I feared might one day take his own life.

“He told me he was addicted to anti-depressant medicine and trying to wean himself off it and confessed he was unhappy.

“We talked about his superstar status and I told him I thought that with his fame and talent and money he had all he needed to be happy in life.

“But when he started talking about the anti-depressants he took I asked him outright if he was happy in life and he replied, ‘No, I’m not.’

http://www.mirror.co.uk/3am/celebrity-news/george-michaels-lover-says-singer-9624900