Tagged: Suicide

Psychiatry Has Destroyed Sinead O’ Connor..


 

https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100006731236998

Irish singer, Sinead O’ Connor, has hit the headlines again, with an impassioned and heartbreaking cry for help to her family through an online video. In distressing and harrowing Facebook posts over the last few weeks, Sinead has been crying out for her family to reach out to her. From the videos and messages she has been posting for almost two years now, it is obvious that Sinead is in a very bad state, and has been for at least a decade, but what has her led her to this crisis?

How did one of the most talented, and famous, female singers- in the world- end up alone, isolated, and severely ‘mentally ill’ to the point of suicide, in a motel in the outskirts of New Jersey?

Sinead, now 50, has been ‘under the care’ of psychiatry (that’s if you could call it ‘care’), and under the ‘treatment’ of psychiatric drugs for years, and if her recent video is anything to go by, the effects of this (mis) treatment have utterly destroyed her mental and physical health, her relationships with family and friends, and possibly her career, and her life too.

Sinead is one of milions (globally) destroyed by the polypharmacy medication merry go round of psychiatric drug treatment. Those of us that have been through this system of psychiatric drugging and mis-treatment (and suffered side effects which made our condition worse), know all too well the dire consequences of it. It’s difficult to see, or to understand, the damage been done to you while you are in it. The meds keep you sedated, and suppressed, so much so that you can be completely unaware. Tragically, people like Sinead  end up stuck in the psychiatric system, not realizing that the system itself is damaging them, but so vulnerable that they are helpless to get out of its grip.

Robert Whitaker’s book ‘Anatomy of an epidemic‘ details the results of mass drugging of the population, and the outcomes are not good, in fact they are extremely grim, particularly for those who have been medicated long term…

 

 “…Whitaker has persuaded me that American psychiatry, in collusion with the pharmaceutical industry, may be perpetrating the biggest case of iatrogenesis—harmful medical treatment–in history….” (Scientific American)

 

Leonie Fennell did an excellent post about Sinead and her experiences with psychiatry 4 years ago-

 

“….Here’s a recent clip of Sinead O’Connor speaking on her treatment by an Irish Psychiatrist.

Sinead says that she was misdiagnosed with Bipolar Disorder and subsequently prescribed ‘toxic’ doses of Lamictal (400mgs) and Amitriptyline (200mgs). She describes her psychiatrist as a horrible ‘b’ who did not inform her of the side-effects while on the drugs, or while coming off them.

Dishing out the pills is always the first-line treatment for people that psychiatry see as ‘abnormal’. Sinead O’Connor is perfectly normal by the way, and fabulously outspoken; she didn’t need fixing! Strange that dangerous drugs can be given to a person for years for an ‘illness’ which didn’t exist. Never mind all that comes with that, not least the weight gain, depersonalization, worsening depression and huge expense; would any other profession get away with such sloppy work? Reported adverse effects of these drugs on the RxISK website: Lamictal and Amitriptyline.

The full video can be viewed here….”

 

 



 

In the video above, Sinead seems to be aware that the medications she’s being prescribed are toxic, as she details the various side effects she has had over the years, however it seems that she is stuck in the psychiatric system, without realizing that it is in fact- the psychiatric system that is the problem.

In another article from 2013 she says –

https://truthman30.wordpress.com/2015/12/02/sinead-oconnors-past-psychiatric-drug-use/

 “They are extremely debilitating drugs. Tiring to the extreme. Ironically, extremely depressing. They can cause suicidal or self-harm type thinking. They can mess up your menstrual cycle very badly and cause you to be incapacitated for a week before.

“[They] f**k up your liver, your kidneys, your eyes, your appetite, your entire way of thinking and generally your entire life..”


Sinead will only get better when she gets away from the psychiatric system and the regime of drugging that the psychiatrists subject patients to. The psychiatric survivor movement is now global, and I hope that Sinead doesn’t end up just another casualty of mass psychiatric drugging. I hope she gets off the psych drugs, and then she can start her journey of healing.

If you haven’t heard the song ‘Troy’ from Sinead’s first album – The Lion and The Cobra- you really should, it’s spine-tingling. It’s Sinead at the height of her creative power, only 19 at the time. Compare that with the video from her facebook cry for help -above (30 years later), and bear witness to the damage that over a decade of psychiatric ill- treatment and psychiatric drugging does to an individual.


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Should A Proven Felon And Criminal (GSK) Have Any Credibility At All In A Court Of Law?…


Think about it..

Would you trust the word of a convicted felon and fraudster? one that had to pay the department of justice 3 Billion dollars for fraud, bribery and ‘harm to patients’ offenses dating back many years? Would you trust the word of a sociopathic organization like this? It would be absurd to afford GSK any credibility in trustworthiness and truth wouldn’t it?

See Whistle-Blower Greg Thorpe’s hair raising legal complaint about GSK here-

https://truthman30.wordpress.com/2015/08/28/whistleblower-greg-thorpes-7th-ammended-complaint/


 

https://www.law360.com/articles/950287/reed-smith-atty-s-doctor-knew-of-suicide-risk-gsk-says

 

Reed Smith Atty’s Doctor Knew Of Suicide Risk, GSK Says

Law360, New York (August 1, 2017, 10:12 PM EDT) — GlaxoSmithKline pressed an Illinois federal court Monday to undo a $3 million verdict in favor of the widow of a Reed Smith LLP lawyer who committed suicide after taking generic Paxil, saying the prescribing doctor’s knowledge of the risks relieved the drugmaker of responsibility.
Wendy Dolin sued GSK in 2012, two years after her husband Stewart stepped in front of a train in downtown Chicago. Stewart Dolin had struggled with anxiety and depression off and on, and began taking paroxetine just a few days before his death. A jury this spring awarded $2 million for wrongful death and $1 million for pain and suffering in the days before he took his life.

Glaxo’s new brief elaborates on earlier arguments it has made in favor of a new trial, after Wendy Dolin urged against the move in recent weeks. The drugmaker said that the trial testimony of Stewart Dolin’s prescribing doctor revealed that he believed paroxetine could increase Dolin’s suicidality. Via the learned-intermediary doctrine, Glaxo said, that would mean it had washed its hands of the matter.

“Plaintiff fails to identify a single Illinois decision holding that a manufacturer can be held liable for failure to warn” in a suit like this, the company said.

The trial testimony of prescribing doctor Martin Sachman “shows that he was aware of the very risk that mattered to him when deciding to prescribe paroxetine for Mr. Dolin.”

GSK included an excerpt of his questioning where he was asked, “When you reinitiated paroxetine for Mr. Dolin in 2010, you went over with him the fact that he needed to be on the [lookout] for the signs and symptoms of agitation, increased restlessness or insomnia, panic attacks, worsening depression, or suicidal thoughts or behavior after he started the medication?”

Sachman replied, “Right.”

The company pushed back against Wendy Dolin’s claim that the risk Sachman was saying he was aware of was the obvious depression-related suicide risk, not a medication-related risk; Dolin “selectively cites” Sachman’s testimony to reach that conclusion, the drugmaker said, and didn’t try to push back against Sachman’s agreement that he didn’t realize that a 2006 label that warned him properly about what happened to Dolin was later changed before Dolin’s death.

GSK also said its hands were tied because drug regulators would not allow the company to use the specific warning language that it wanted. The label for the drug changed more than once between 2006 and 2010 as the U.S. Food and Drug Administration examined it.

And the company also took issue with a myriad of jury instructions that it says didn’t fully separate out different elements necessary for liability.

According to Wendy Dolin, the doctor testified that when he decided to prescribe the drug he relied on the 2010 Paxil label, which didn’t warn that Paxil could lead to suicidality in adults over 24. The doctor also testified that if GSK had warned of that risk, he wouldn’t have prescribed paroxetine to Dolin in 2010, Wendy Dolin said.

But Dolin says GSK never proposed her desired warning: A short statement that taking Paxil is associated with suicidality in adults over 24. “Since GSK never attempted to insert that simple warning anywhere into the Paxil label, GSK cannot meet its burden of providing ‘clear evidence’ that the FDA would have rejected such a labeling change, especially when the only FDA expert to testify at trial rejected that notion,” Dolin said.

Dolin argued the company had failed to alert drug regulators that research showed increased suicide risk in adults. With a short exception, the potential for suicide in adults was left off, and doctors were left uninformed, the suit said.

The FDA also invited GSK to discuss the inclusion of language specific to adult suicidality in the label at a formal meeting in 2007, but the company didn’t take the agency up on its offer, Dolin said.

Representatives for the parties were not immediately available for comment Tuesday.

Wendy Dolin is represented by R. Brent Wisner, Michael Baum, Bijan Esfandiari and Frances Phares of Baum Hedlund Aristei & Goldman PC, and David Rapoport and Matthew Sims of Rapoport Law Offices PC.

GSK is represented by Andrew Bayman, Todd Davis, Ursula Henninger and Heather Howard of King & Spalding LLP and Alan Gilbert and Anders Wick of Dentons.

The case is Dolin v. SmithKline Beecham Corp. et al., case number 1:12-cv-06403, in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois.

–Additional reporting by Emily Field. Editing by Brian Baresch.

What Did They Prescribe Chester Bennington?


Petrusich-Chester-Bennington-1

 

http://www.eonline.com/news/868229/the-dark-side-of-linkin-park-s-chester-bennington-alcoholism-and-depression-inspired-and-plagued-singer-shadowing-his-massive-success

 

“…Meeting his second wife helped pull him out of a period of “absolute self-destruction,” he told Bullz-Eye.com in 2009 while promoting Out of Ashes. “I don’t know when to stop when I’m in that mode. I’ll go through a gallon of Jack Daniels and down some antidepressants in one night and keep on going. I just hated my life at one point. I loved my band, career and friends, but when I got home from tour, I couldn’t deal with stuff. I would just begin drinking.”

 

RIP Chester..

 

https://www.theguardian.com/music/2017/jul/21/chester-bennington-obituary

Chester Bennington obituary

Vocalist with the band Linkin Park whose sound was emblematic of the nu-metal genre

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Linkin Park’s Chester Bennington dies aged 41

The death of Chester Bennington, vocalist with the rap and nu-metal band Linkin Park, at the age of 41, curtails a brilliantly successful career that brought a string of awards and multimillion-selling albums and singles. Linkin Park enjoyed enormous and immediate acclaim with their debut album Hybrid Theory (2000), released on Warner Bros after the band had been rejected by several labels. The combination of Mike Shinoda’s rapping and Bennington’s soaring, impassioned singing became the band’s instant focal point, with the group’s metallic thunder enhanced by edgy electronic treatments. Their sound became emblematic of the nu-metal genre, alongside like-minded artists such as Korn and Limp Bizkit.

Hybrid Theory sold nearly 5m copies in its first year and to date has sold more than 20m, and reached No 2 on the US chart and No 4 in the UK. The singles Crawling, One Step Closer and In the End became radio favourites, receiving heavy airplay on MTV, and in 2002 Crawling won a Grammy for best hard rock performance. The album Reanimation (2002) comprised remixes of Hybrid Theory songs plus additional material, and was another international multimillion-seller.

When the band released Meteora in 2003, following intensive touring in the US, including dates with their own multi-artist Projekt Revolution tour, it shot to the top of the US and UK album charts and spawned a fresh batch of hit singles, including Somewhere I Belong, Breaking the Habit and Numb, the last of these an anthem of Bennington’s disconnection from the world. The album went on to sell more than 10m copies. In 2004, Linkin Park teamed up with Jay-Z on the EP Collision Course, mixing rap with metal; the track Numb/Encore, splicing together the band’s Numb with Jay-Z’s Encore, went to 20 on the US singles chart and 14 in the UK. In 2005 it won a Grammy for best rap/sung collaboration.

But while his music provided a cathartic outlet, Bennington had experienced an assortment of emotional and drug-related issues since childhood. He was a close friend of Chris Cornell, the lead singer of Soundgarden, who killed himself in May, and wrote a heartfelt posthumous letter to Cornell. Bennington was found dead at his home in California on what would have been Cornell’s 53rd birthday.

Bennington was born in Phoenix, Arizona. His mother, Susan Elaine Johnson, was a nurse, and his father, Lee Russell Bennington, a police detective who often worked on child abuse cases. They divorced when he was 11, after which his father gained custody of Chester. He had two older sisters and an older half-brother, Brian. Since his father often worked double shifts, Chester frequently found himself at home alone. He fell into a pattern of drug and alcohol abuse, and, he once told Metal Hammer magazine, “dropped so much acid I’m surprised I can still speak. I’d smoke a bunch of crack, do a bit of meth and just sit there and freak out. Then I’d smoke opium to come down.”

His emotional state was further affected by the fact that he suffered sexual abuse by an older friend between the ages of seven and 13. “It destroyed my self-confidence,” he told Kerrang! in 2008. “Like most people, I was too afraid to say anything. I didn’t want people to think that I was gay or that I was lying.” He was also bullied at school.

He found some respite in drawing and songwriting, and was a fan of Depeche Mode and Stone Temple Pilots. At 17 he moved in with his mother, and worked at Burger King while attempting to become a musician. His first group, Sean Dowdell and His Friends?, made a three-track cassette in 1993, after which Bennington and Dowdell formed the alternative-rock band Grey Daze, who released three albums during the 1990s.

Bennington married Samantha Olit in 1996, quit Grey Daze in 1998 and moved to Los Angeles to further his musical career. He auditioned for a band called Xero, and when he was hired as vocalist he completed the original line-up of what then became Linkin Park (a pun on Lincoln Park in Santa Monica), alongside Shinoda, Brad Delson, Dave Farrell, Rob Bourdon and Joe Hahn.

In 2005 Bennington put together a side project, Dead By Sunrise, featuring musicians from Orgy and the Street Drum Corps and comprising songs he considered “darker and moodier than anything I’d come up with for the band”. In 2009 they released their only album, Out of Ashes, which scraped into the US Top 30.

Linkin Park returned in 2007 with the album Minutes to Midnight, co-produced with Rick Rubin and marking a deliberate step towards a more mainstream rock sound. This delivered the big hit singles What I’ve Done, Bleed It Out and Shadow of the Day, which all scored heavily in the American alt and rock charts. New Divide, from the soundtrack compilation album Transformers – Revenge of the Fallen (2009), gave them another major hit. Their subsequent albums, A Thousand Suns (2010) and Living Things (2012), saw sales falling way below their earlier peaks, but they still delivered big hit singles including The Catalyst, Waiting for the End and the anthemic Burn It Down.

In 2013 Bennington joined Stone Temple Pilots after they fired the vocalist Scott Weiland, and, after recording the EP High Rise, stayed with them until 2015. “I got to create and perform with one of the greatest rock bands of our generation, that had so much influence on me growing up,” he said afterwards. He was back with Linkin Park for The Hunting Party (2014), on which they tacked back towards a heavier rock sound. One More Light (2017) was, by comparison with the group’s original sound, virtually a pop record. “It’s a great record, we love it,” insisted Bennington to hostile critics, and the album shot to the top of the US Billboard chart.

Bennington had tackled his addiction issues with some success, admitting falling off the wagon in 2005 when he divorced, but getting clean again in 2006 when he married Talinda Bentley, a schoolteacher and former model. In the run-up to the release of One More Light, he seemed optimistic and positive, saying that he had shaken off the depression he had felt two years earlier. “I know exactly who I am, I know exactly what I’m made of and I’m totally happy with it,” he said.

He is survived by Talinda and their children, Tyler Lee, Lily and Lila; by a son, Draven Sebastian, from his first marriage; and by two sons, Jaime and Isaiah, from a relationship with Elka Brand.

Chester Charles Bennington, singer and songwriter, born 20 March 1976; died 20 July 2017

 

13 Ways That GSK Hid The Seroxat/Paxil Suicide Signal…


Seroxat/Paxil/Aropax (Paroxetine) : The Anti-Depressant that makes you want to kill yourself!..

 


https://davidhealy.org/change-in-chicago-whose-problem/

Change in Chicago: Whose Problem?

May, 24, 2017 | Reply

Stewart Dolin’s Doctor Says (about Paxil) : ““I don’t trust the labeling,” he said. “I don’t trust the company, to be honest.”…


And why would he?

Why would anybody trust GSK? Would you trust a felon?

The Dolin trial opened a can of worms about Paxil/Seroxat, suicidality and akathisia which GSK would rather remained tightly in the can. It’s too late now though, the worms are already out…

See Dr. David Healy’s excellent new post about wider implications of the Stewart Dolin Paxil induced suicide trial.


“……The regulatory history of Paxil and the other SSRI’s was almost Byzantine.   For years they carried no warnings of a risk for suicide.  In 2004, after thousands of troubling reports, a Black Box warning was finally issued for children and adolescents.  A number of medical experts felt the warning should apply with equal urgency to adults.

However, in 2007, the FDA decided on a uniform warning for all antidepressants, old and new.  This was the “24 and under” label attached to both brand-name and generic Paxil in 2010.  This suited GSK just fine.  The FDA invited the company to discuss whether additional warnings were needed for Paxil, but GSK never took them up on it.

More importantly, it never fully shared with the FDA—and still less with doctors in the community—what it knew about the real risks of its product.  In fact, GSK had known since 1989 that its drug could trigger akathisia, an agonizing combination of physical restlessness and emotional turmoil that could lead to suicide.  The risk applied to both teenagers and adults; at least twenty suicides had occurred in patients on Paxil in clinical trials, the majority of them in people over age thirty…..”


https://davidhealy.org/change-in-chicago-dr-welby-on-the-witness-stand/

Change in Chicago:  Dr. Welby on the Witness Stand

May, 15, 2017 | 8 Comments

Editorial Note: This is part three in the Change in Chicago series covering the Dolin trial and its implications.  Like part 1 it is written by  Johanna Ryan – The Dolin Verdict and Playing Go

By twenty-first century American standards, Stu Dolin’s medical care was close to ideal.  That’s a hard idea to swallow, given what happened to him in the end, but it’s true.  The real paradox is why it wasn’t enough to save him – and how his doctor became a victim as well.

In June 2010, while taking a generic version of the antidepressant Paxil, Dolin jumped in front of an oncoming subway train in downtown Chicago.  His family was convinced that the medication had caused his suicide.  Last month, a federal jury agreed.  They found GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) liable for Dolin’s death, and awarded $3 million to his widow Wendy – two million for her own loss, and one million for Stu Dolin’s own suffering in his last week of life.

Few people succeed in suing the drug company when a loved one dies from the effects of his medication.  It’s far more common to sue the prescribing doctor.  Plenty of lawyers are willing to take on a malpractice insurer with limited loyalty to the doctor, and a lively interest in a reasonable settlement.  To face off against a multinational corporation with an unlimited war chest, which will fight like hell for the reputation of its product, is something else entirely.

An even bigger barrier is something called the Learned Intermediary Doctrine.  Under American law, drug companies have no obligation to level with you, the patient, about the potential hazards of the drug.  Their only obligation is to tell your doctor about those risks.  He or she is then expected to function as a “learned intermediary” – a sort of educated bodyguard who will tell you what you need to know, in language you can understand, and see to it that no harm comes to you.   The drug’s official label (that enormous, technical document folded up and stuffed into the drug package) is written with your doctor, not you, in mind.

But what if that official label does not tell the whole truth about the drug’s hazards?  That was the situation faced by Martin Sachman, M.D., Stu Dolin’s family doctor, who became a key witness in the Dolin lawsuit.

Marcus Welby M.D. – the old-school family doctor

That’s not Martin Sachman in the picture at the top of today’s blog – it’s Robert Young in the title role of Marcus Welby, M.D., the popular prime-time TV drama from the 1970’s.  To most of us, Dr. Welby represents the family doctor we wish we could have – the one our parents had in the good old days.  He was a settled presence in the neighborhood; he’d known you and your family for years.  You could go to him for advice on just about anything, and you tended to trust what he told you.

For Dolin, Marty Sachman was that kind of doctor.  Since about 2005, Sachman has had what’s known as a “concierge” practice.  For an annual fee of about $2,000 (over and above their usual insurance costs), patients can get something close to a Marcus Welby level of care from a doctor of this type.  They can be reached on weekends, may even make house calls from time to time, and you’re almost never limited to a ten-minute appointment.

Sachman had been Stu Dolin’s doctor for at least ten years. He was also a close personal friend.  (That’s unusual enough these days that attorneys rushed to assure the jury there was nothing “unethical” about it.  A generation or two ago it was fairly common, especially in small towns.)   Often, faced with a difficult medical decision, there’s one question we really want to ask the doctor: Would you give the same advice to a loved one or a best friend, if they were in my shoes?  Mostly, we don’t have the nerve to ask.  Stu Dolin was lucky enough to know the answer would be yes.

A Job For A General Practitioner

Most family doctors take that Learned Intermediary business fairly seriously.  It’s one reason why they refrain from handling “specialty” drugs for complex or serious conditions, which may require expert management.  Chemotherapy for cancer; biologic drugs for Crohn’s disease, MS and other autoimmune disorders – those are best left to specialists.

When he began practicing medicine in the 1980’s, Sachman explained, antidepressants were in that category.  The older ones were more problematic, with more side effects, and were reserved for people with relatively severe symptoms.  Rather than try to treat such patients  himself, he’d refer them to a psychiatrist.

This changed when Paxil, Prozac and the other SSRI drugs came out in the early 1990’s.  They were depicted as being safe enough to be handled by general practitioners, and a reasonable option for patients whose troubles didn’t warrant seeing a psychiatrist.  By the mid-2000’s, this had become the first-line option for dealing with both depression and anxiety.

As Dr. Sachman saw it, if a patient had mild to moderate depression in response to some trouble or stress in his life that was a “reactive” depression for which he could prescribe SSRI’s.  If they had serious problems with sleep and appetite, a slowed-down or unusually agitated appearance, and an inability to function in daily life, that was true “clinical depression,” and they should see a psychiatrist.

Dr. Sachman knew Stu Dolin well, and the anxiety he complained of in June 2010 did not alarm him.  Stu was just going through “one of his stress periods, on account of his work responsibilities.  He seemed to be getting through it like he did the other times.”  Dr. Sachman’s diagnosis was situational anxiety.  A drug like Paxil could help people get through a rough period like this.  The condition was fairly benign—and like the overwhelming majority of his colleagues, he considered Paxil to be a fairly benign drug.

A “Warning Label” that failed to warn

By 2010, the official label for Paxil gave physicians no reason to doubt that assessment – at least for adult patients.  It warned that any antidepressant could trigger agitation and suicidal impulses in children and youth up to the age of 24.  However, it also stated that “short-term studies did not show an increase in the risk of suicidality with antidepressants compared to placebo in adults beyond age 24,” and showed lowered suicidality in those over 65.

The warning added two more crucial sentences:

“Depression and certain other psychiatric disorders are themselves associated with increases in the risk of suicide.   Patients of all ages who are started on antidepressant therapy should be monitored appropriately and observed closely for clinical worsening, suicidality or unusual changes in behavior.”

As psychiatrist Joseph Glenmullen told the jury, this label effectively blinded doctors to the risks faced by adults:  “What this tells me as a practicing psychiatrist is that if I’m treating a 57-year-old patient, and I put them on Paxil, Paxil couldn’t make them worse.  Paxil couldn’t make them suicidal.”  If they did feel worse, said Glenmullen, “it would be, and it says explicitly, their depression or other underlying psychiatric condition.”

Worst of all, he said, “if the patient gets worse and it might be the drug, what do you do?  You take them off the drug to see.  If they get worse and it couldn’t be the drug but it’s the depression, what do you do?  You increase the drug, which is going to worsen the risk.  So it’s very dangerous.”

The regulatory history of Paxil and the other SSRI’s was almost Byzantine.   For years they carried no warnings of a risk for suicide.  In 2004, after thousands of troubling reports, a Black Box warning was finally issued for children and adolescents.  A number of medical experts felt the warning should apply with equal urgency to adults.

However, in 2007, the FDA decided on a uniform warning for all antidepressants, old and new.  This was the “24 and under” label attached to both brand-name and generic Paxil in 2010.  This suited GSK just fine.  The FDA invited the company to discuss whether additional warnings were needed for Paxil, but GSK never took them up on it.

More importantly, it never fully shared with the FDA—and still less with doctors in the community—what it knew about the real risks of its product.  In fact, GSK had known since 1989 that its drug could trigger akathisia, an agonizing combination of physical restlessness and emotional turmoil that could lead to suicide.  The risk applied to both teenagers and adults; at least twenty suicides had occurred in patients on Paxil in clinical trials, the majority of them in people over age thirty.

A Doctor Taken Hostage

Thanks to GSK, that information never reached Marty Sachman.  If it had, he testified, he would never have prescribed Paxil for Stu Dolin.  There were plenty of other options—other drugs, and non-drug strategies – for treating situational anxiety.  Because of the warning label, he said, he had never prescribed Paxil to a patient under 25; the benefits didn’t seem worth the risk.  He had a few adult patients who seemed to do well on Paxil; if they had been on it for several years and wanted to continue, he would refill it.  However, in the seven years since Stu Dolin’s death he had not written a single new Paxil script:  “I don’t trust the labeling,” he said.  “I don’t trust the company, to be honest.”

Marty Sachman’s anguish—and his sense of betrayal—was apparent to everyone in the courtroom.  Physicians like himself, he said, “rely on truth and honesty from pharmaceutical companies, and to falsify information or hold back information is totally criminal. How can we treat people effectively and safely if we can’t depend on that?”  They couldn’t.  Instead, he had prescribed a drug, and a patient had died.  That alone would have been traumatic for any honest doctor; that the patient was his best friend made it devastating.  It was not like being a Learned Intermediary; it was more like being a hostage.

So what about the average Joe?

Dr. Sachman never got the chance for a follow-up visit with Stu Dolin; within six days of starting Paxil, he was dead.  If he had, it’s just possible he could have spotted his longtime patient’s real problem. Maybe even stopped the Paxil.  We’ll never know.

In 2010, the year Stu Dolin died, doctors wrote 259 million antidepressant prescriptions.  For most patients, who don’t have access to anyone remotely resembling Dr. Welby, the situation is even scarier.  They may get a script for an SSRI in a ten-minute encounter with an overworked stranger, based on a checklist left in the waiting room so that every patient can be “screened” for depression.  The potential number of doctors taken hostage – and patients tossed overboard – is hard to imagine.

I have to think genial old Marcus Welby, M.D. wouldn’t stand for it.  What about us?

Chris Cornell’s Wife Issues Statement, Blames Anxiety Medicine for Suicide


Interesting article about the death of Soundgarden lead singer, Chris Cornell. I loved Soundgarden when I was a teenager. RIP Chris,

http://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/chris-cornells-wife-issues-statement-w483179

 

Statement, Blames Anxiety Medicine for Suicide

“When we spoke after the show, I noticed he was slurring his words,” Vicky Cornell says. “He was different”

Vicky Cornell, the wife of Soundgarden singer Chris Cornell, issued a statement Friday morning where she remembered her late husband, who died Thursday morning at the age of 52, and speculated whether his suicide was the result of taking too much of his anxiety medication.

“Chris’s death is a loss that escapes words and has created an emptiness in my heart that will never be filled. As everyone who knew him commented, Chris was a devoted father and husband. He was my best friend,” Vicky wrote.

“His world revolved around his family first and, of course, his music second. He flew home for Mother’s Day to spend time with our family. He flew out mid-day Wednesday, the day of the show, after spending time with the children. When we spoke before the show, we discussed plans for a vacation over Memorial Day and other things we wanted to do.”

However, following Soundgarden’s concert Wednesday night, Vicky noticed a change in her husband’s demeanor when they talked on the phone after the show.

“When we spoke after the show, I noticed he was slurring his words; he was different. When he told me he may have taken an extra Ativan or two, I contacted security and asked that they check on him,” she continued. “What happened is inexplicable and I am hopeful that further medical reports will provide additional details. I know that he loved our children and he would not hurt them by intentionally taking his own life.”

An attorney for the Cornell family, Kirk Pasich, reiterated Vicky’s belief that an extra dosage of Ativan, an anxiety medication often employed by recovering addicts, altered Chris Cornell’s mental faculties after the Detroit show. Pasich added that the Cornell family is “disturbed at inferences that Chris knowingly and intentionally took his life.”

“Without the results of toxicology tests, we do not know what was going on with Chris — or if any substances contributed to his demise,” Pasich said. “Chris, a recovering addict, had a prescription for Ativan and may have taken more Ativan than recommended dosages. The family believes that if Chris took his life, he did not know what he was doing, and that drugs or other substances may have affected his actions.”

Pasich added that side effects of Ativan include “paranoid or suicidal thoughts, slurred speech and impaired judgment”; Vicky Cornell noted her husband’s slurred speech following the Detroit concert in her statement.

She added, “The outpouring of love and support from his fans, friends and family means so much more to us than anyone can know. Thank you for that, and for understanding how difficult this is for us.”

Hours after Cornell’s death at a Detroit hotel, a medical examiner’s report confirmed that the singer had died by suicide.

Chris Cornell, lead singer for Soundgarden, has died at age 52. Watch here.

Paxil-Aropax-Seroxat And Other SSRI’s Caused Suicidal Thoughts In Children..


The same in adults..

same in all ages..

 

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4431472/Anti-depressants-caused-suicidal-thoughts-children.html

 

EXCLUSIVE: ‘Daddy, please kill me I can’t do this any more’: Meet the CHILDREN prescribed anti-depressants for anxiety that ‘made them suicidal’ – as scores of parents join in a class action

  •  Two mothers have spoken out about their children’s adverse reactions to the anti-depressant drugs
  •  Sydney mother Donna’s son Seth went on anti-depressants when he was five and he is now 10 years of age
  •  Mel’s daughter Maiya, from Brisbane went on anti-depressants seven years ago, when she was six years old
  • The concerned mothers claimed their young children suffered from suicidal symptoms  

A mother who watched as her 10-year-old son rocked in a corner of his room begging for someone to kill him to end his misery has revealed how anti-depressants turned her ‘gentle, loving’ son into angry and suicidal young boy.

Sydney mother Donna is one of dozens of people involved in a class action over the use of ‘adult’ antidepressants in children in Australia.

The concerned mother spoke to Daily Mail Australia from beside her son Seth’s hospital bed on Friday after he was admitted for psychiatric care following multiple attempts to end his own life while being weaned off the antidepressant Aropax.

‘One day I came outside and he had a pair of scissors to his chest – he kept saying he was going to do it, so I had to call an ambulance,’ Donna said.

‘He was cuffed by paramedics and at the hospital I had to watch as he was held down by doctors, three security guards, nurses, and his father so he could be sedated.

Seth, pictured with mother Donna, has suffered from side effects of his antidepressants which include suicidal thoughts

Seth, pictured with mother Donna, has suffered from side effects of his antidepressants which include suicidal thoughts

The ten-year-old is now being weened off the drug is a Sydney psych ward

The ten-year-old is now being weened off the drug is a Sydney psych ward

Maiya, 13, has been on Zoloft since she was six, after she had some tantrums at school

Maiya, 13, has been on Zoloft since she was six, after she had some tantrums at school

‘He looked at me and said ‘please don’t let them do it mummy I will be good’ I will never forget that look on his face.’

Now, aged 10, he is in a psych ward of a Sydney hospital after a devastating few months where he would go from ‘rocking and crying in the corner asking his parents to kill him’, to trying to jump out of his mother’s moving car.

Brisbane mother Mel, 34, also revealed the devastating effect antidepressants had on her daughter Maiya, now 13. The child, who after taking the drugs at just six years old, started ‘fantasising about death’.

‘I will never forget the moment she looked up to me and said ‘mummy, I want to go with the angels now’, it was just after an episode which saw her crying for days,’ Mel said.

The despairing mothers said they both ‘feel like it is their fault’ for making their young children take the doctor-prescribed pills.

But the lawyer running the proposed class action, Tony Nikolic, told Daily Mail Australia he had heard the stories of up to 60 children who suffered severely after taking antidepressants.

This picture was taken two weeks ago while Seth was being weened off the drugs

This picture was taken two weeks ago while Seth was being weened off the drugs

'I will never forget the moment she looked up to me and said 'mummy, I want to go with the angels now',' her mother Mel said

‘I will never forget the moment she looked up to me and said ‘mummy, I want to go with the angels now’,’ her mother Mel said

Maiya, pictured here with her younger sisters 6 months after being off the drug is now a happier person 

Maiya, pictured here with her younger sisters 6 months after being off the drug is now a happier person

The young girl, pictured here with her mother Mel, used to cut at her hair when she got angry

The young girl, pictured here with her mother Mel, used to cut at her hair when she got angry

‘A bad night’:  Seth’s anxiety got the better of him at his brother’s birthday and he had to leave the crowd shortly after this photo was taken

‘A bad night’:  Seth’s anxiety got the better of him at his brother’s birthday and he had to leave the crowd shortly after this photo was taken

‘The complaints range from people who were given it from as young as five – to teenagers who were put on them,’ he said.

The lawyer says the fact the two drugs are ‘not recommended for children’ is little known.

‘We know the 90 days coming on and 90 days coming off are the worst times for these families – as well as any time the dose is changed- that is when there is most likely to be trouble.’

The product information on both drugs says they are not recommended for children, but doctors continue to prescribe them.

Psychiatrist and Adelaide University research leader Doctor Jon Jureidini told Daily Mail Australia the drugs are widely used to treat anxiety in young children – but there is ‘no evidence supporting it’.

He claims doctors are given ‘contradictory information’ from the pharmaceutical companies – which ‘over the years have promoted the use of antidepressants in children’ despite the warnings on the drugs which say use for children isn’t recommended.

The young girl was at her most depressed when she was 11 and 12, pictured during that time here

The young girl was at her most depressed when she was 11 and 12, pictured during that time here

Seth was diagnosed with separation anxiety and ADHD in March 2012, when he was five, at the end of the year he was put on 20mg of Aropax

‘There is information which suggests tens of thousands of young people are on anti-depressants in Australia.

‘With these so-called anti-depressants a small number of children become suicidal and violent.

‘With any drug used in children it should be monitored very closely, and parents should get a second opinion,’ he said.

Seth’s mother Donna thought she was ‘doing the right thing’ by her son when she gave him the drugs because she ‘assumed the doctors knew what they were talking about’.

He was diagnosed with separation anxiety and ADHD in March 2012, when he was five, at the end of the year he was put on 20mg of Aropax.

According to the company’s product information ‘when AROPAX was tested in children under 18 years with major depressive disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder or social anxiety, there were additional unwanted effects to those seen in adults, such as suicidal thoughts, hostile and unfriendly behaviour and changing moods.

‘The use of AROPAX is not recommended to treat major depressive disorder in children under 18, as the drug has not been shown to be effective in this age group. The long-term safety effects of paroxetine in this age group have not yet been demonstrated.’

The drugs appeared to ‘fix’ the boy’s anxiety when he was first introduced to them.

This picture was taken just weeks before going on the drug

This picture was taken just weeks before going on the drug

Seth's mother Donna thought she was 'doing the right thing' by her son when she gave him the drugs because she 'assumed the doctors knew what they were talking about'

Seth’s mother Donna thought she was ‘doing the right thing’ by her son when she gave him the drugs because she ‘assumed the doctors knew what they were talking about’

‘For five days he was almost euphoric. He had no fear or inhibitions, he was busking, he was going to class, he was like a normal child. I thought it was working.

‘Then he started having fits laughter- even when he was in trouble. Not long after that things started going wrong.’

Then the angry bursts started, which meant he became a problem at school and could no longer attend.

‘The smallest things would set him off it could be something simple like asking him to have a bath or go brush his teeth.’

He became violent toward his mother and started hitting her and trying to rip out her hair.

When he was nine, and his behaviour was deteriorating the family decided he needed more help. Doctors doubled his dose of the drug.

‘He was euphoric again and I thought I must have been wrong to think it wasn’t working the way they said it would. But then he got way worse and I knew it was the medication. Seth’s suicidal tendencies got worse.

‘His father called me one day and told me Seth needed me, by the time I got to him he was in a ball, rocking in the corner yelling ”daddy please kill me I don’t want to do this anymore” it was absolutely heart-breaking, really hard to see your own child like that,’ she said.

‘I never knew it wasn’t for children, we were never told, if I had I wouldn’t have made him take it.’

She was ten, pictured left when her 2nd psychiatrist ‘upped her dose’

The family is happier now that Maiya has stopped having angry bursts and depressive thoughts

The family is happier now that Maiya has stopped having angry bursts and depressive thoughts

Mel’s daughter Maiya, 13, took Zoloft for seven years – her depression continued to spiral out of control so doctors gave her more of the drug – which her mother says just made her sicker.

The once bubbly little girl had her two sisters, Jazlyn, 12 and Gemirah, seven, ‘walking on eggshells every day’.

‘I thought I was doing the right thing for her, I was just doing what the doctors said, I thought I had lost my baby girl to depression. Finding out the drugs I told her she had to have were making her sad kills me,’ Mel said.

‘She would attack her sisters and scream and yell – but what is worse is when she would just cry.

‘She cried for hours and hours and hours at a time it is heart-breaking to see your baby do that and not know how to help.’

Then 12 months ago Mel stumbled across information on antidepressants which revealed Zoloft, the drug her daughter had been taking, was ‘not recommended for children and could cause suicidal thoughts’.

Pfizer, the maker of Zoloft has confirmed to Daily Mail Australia that it should only be used for children aged 6 to 18 years of age to treat obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD).

The teenager pictured weeks ago with her sister is excited to be able to 'be happy'

The teenager pictured weeks ago with her sister is excited to be able to ‘be happy’

The family used to 'walk on eggshells' to avoid an explosion of anger from the girl

The family used to ‘walk on eggshells’ to avoid an explosion of anger from the girl

Maiya pictured here a few weeks before she was first given anti depressants

Maiya pictured here a few weeks before she was first given anti depressants

‘I just burst into tears when I read it – I showed my mum I couldn’t believe it. We weened her off Zoloft, which was really tough but now she is a completely different kid.

‘She is not angry and there is no aggression. We don’t have unhappy days anymore,’ Mel said.

‘She will always have anxiety but we can cope with that – better then all those days of uncertainty, unhappiness and utter sadness. We never want to see that again.’

The young girl had ‘given up on life’ by the time her mother found the information on Zoloft and had stopped going to school and playing sport.

‘By the time she was 10 she was cutting her hair every time she got frustrated – when we went to see doctors they would put up her dose.

‘I am only speaking out because I never want any parent to go through what we have been through or to have their kids suffer like this.

The young girl had 'given up on life' by the time her mother found the information on Zoloft and had stopped going to school and playing sport

The young girl had ‘given up on life’ by the time her mother found the information on Zoloft and had stopped going to school and playing sport

‘I have seen a spark in her beautiful face that I though we lost a long time ago.’

Mr Nikolic has also looked into the possibility of a class action for adults – because they ‘are not told it is so hard to get off’ and has had about 1,400 people contact him for that.

‘This is a hard one as people don’t know how to complain because they are just one little person who have to try and prove their case against a multi-billion dollar corporation.

‘There is interest in both cases but I have a firm belief a case for children for Aropax and Zoloft has a reasonable prospect of success.’

The lawyer is looking for more people effected by antidepressants after being diagnosed the drugs as children.

‘We are looking for children who have demoniacal physical and psychological disabilities – Kids who took meds and are now in jail or took meds and jumped off a balcony and are now paraplegics.’

'I am only speaking out because I never want any parent to go through what we have been through or to have their kids suffer like this,' Mel said

‘I am only speaking out because I never want any parent to go through what we have been through or to have their kids suffer like this,’ Mel said

These cases could help move the proposed class action forward.

‘The Australian court is difficult, instead of the corporation having to prove they are right the little people have to prove the medication is dangerous and whatever has happened was caused by it.’

Pfizer the manufacturer of Zoloft and GSK the manufacturer of Aropax have both been approached for comment by Daily Mail Australia.

‘Pfizer takes the safety of our medicines very seriously and we are committed to ensuring the appropriate communication of important safety information to health care professionals and patients,’ a spokesperson said.

‘Zoloft (sertraline hydrochloride) is approved in Australia for use in children with obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) aged 6 years or older.

‘Zoloft is not indicated for use in children and adolescents under the age of 18 years for the treatment of any medical condition other than OCD.’

GSK has not yet responded to our request.

 

 

Ed Silverman: Dear Scott Gottlieb: Add new warnings to Paxil labels. You may save a life…


A little too late for many, however good to see someone of Ed Silverman’s character speaking out about the scandal of Seroxat/Paxil.

https://www.statnews.com/pharmalot/2017/05/01/paxil-suicide-warning-fda/?s_campaign=fb&utm_content=buffer12cb5&utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook.com&utm_campaign=buffer

 

D

ear Dr. Gottlieb,

As you inch closer to becoming the new head of the Food and Drug Administration, your list of challenges must be swelling. Here is one more item to add: Whether to insist on a stronger warning label for the antidepressant Paxil.

For the past decade, Paxil’s label has not carried any information indicating the drug poses a statistically significant risk of suicidal behavior for anyone over 25. Yet there is scientific evidence that such a risk is real (see table 16 on page 26). A jury in Chicago recently decided that that a label warning could have prevented the death of a 57-year-old man who killed himself while taking a generic version of Paxil.

For public health reasons, the FDA should pursue a warning.

“Even recognizing the limitations of the data (found in the relevant analysis), it’s hard to understand [why] the increased risk of suicidal behavior, or attempts, is not in the label,” said Dr. David Kessler, a former FDA commissioner and now a professor at the University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine.

Here’s the backstory: Paxil is one of several antidepressants known as an SSRI, a group that includes Prozac and Zoloft. For many years, the drugs were mired in controversy over whether they increased the risk of suicidal behavior and thoughts. The FDA eventually ordered the companies to warn of such a risk for children and young adults.

But what about issuing a warning for adults older than 25? The opportunity was bungled.

Back in 2006, GlaxoSmithKline — which makes Paxil — actually offered to revise its label to indicate a risk existed for adults. But the FDA nixed that in favor of a class-wide warning, limited to children and young adults, for all SSRI drugs. This blunted the effect of the data Glaxo had submitted to the FDA — which showed that adults on Paxil faced a much higher risk than those on all but one other antidepressant.

Instead, the FDA suggested the company could submit a supplemental warning and schedule a meeting for review. This never happened because Glaxo did not follow up (see page 127). As a result, the Paxil labeling never included information about a risk to adults.

For its part, Glaxo does not deny that its studies showed an elevated risk for adults. But the company contends that it properly conveyed all the appropriate data to the FDA and says it was the agency’s call to create a common, class-wide label instead of developing a warning more specific to Paxil.

Now, let’s fast forward to a federal courtroom in Chicago, where documents detailing these developments have been filed.

A five-week trial recently took place over a legally complicated, but significant, question — whether consumers who suffer harm after taking a generic drug should be allowed to sue the company that makes the brand-name version of the medication. In this instance, the man who committed suicide took a generic version of Paxil, made by Mylan.

Glaxo was named in the lawsuit because Mylan had to use its label on the generic. Federal regulations do not allow generic companies to independently change labeling after learning of potential risks, unless a change has already been made to the corresponding brand-name drug. That regulation was upheld in 2011 by the Supreme Court.

As a result, consumers sometimes seek to hold brand-name drug makers responsible for injuries they suffer while taking generics, although more than 100 such cases have been tossed out by courts around the country. Only two survived and one is being appealed. This time, Glaxo was the loser and was ordered to pay $3 million to the man’s widow.

The company, however, plans to appeal, which raises the possibility that not much, if anything, will change. Meanwhile, countless adult Americans will continue to be prescribed a generic version of Paxil that does not contain a warning about the risk of suicidal behavior.

But this should not be the end of the story.

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Most consumers may not realize this, but drug makers legally own the right to the labeling on their medicines. Yes, the wording is developed during talks with the FDA, but a company can certainly consider adding an additional warning.

Glaxo “had the option to go further, but chose not to do so,” said Dr. David Healy, a Bangor University psychiatry professor who helped spearhead a campaign to upgrade suicide warnings on antidepressants, and who served as an expert witness on behalf of the widow in the recent trial.

Perhaps Glaxo bet it would not face lawsuits from consumers who took the generic. Nonetheless, the possibility of harm has existed all this time. And that is something the FDA should have realized. (An FDA spokeswoman told me the agency would not comment.)

So, Dr. Gottlieb, as you look over your to-do list, consider the lack of information in the Paxil labeling. And move to fix it. You might save a life.

BMJ: US drug regulators should consider adding adults to SSRI suicide warning, says campaigner


http://www.bmj.com/content/357/bmj.j2050
News

US drug regulators should consider adding adults to SSRI suicide warning, says campaigner

BMJ 2017; 357 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.j2050 (Published 25 April 2017) Cite this as: BMJ 2017;357:j2050

  1. Ed Silverman

Author affiliations

A British doctor who campaigned for the public to be warned about increased suicide risk in young people taking antidepressants has said that US drug regulators should consider including adults in warnings.

David Healy, a psychiatry professor at Bangor University, called for the warnings after GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) was ordered to pay $3m (£2.34m; €2.75m) to the widow of a US man who killed himself shortly after starting generic paroxetine.

The jury in the case of Stewart Dolin, a 57 year old attorney, concluded that GSK had failed to properly warn the public about the increased risk of suicide when taking paroxetine. The jury reached its verdict after lawyers for Dolin’s widow, Wendy, presented evidence in the Chicago federal court suggesting that GSK knew that paroxetine posed a risk to adults but had concealed or manipulated data.

Dolin stepped in front of a train in July 2010 shortly after starting a generic version of paroxetine that was sold by Mylan Pharmaceuticals. Mylan was originally named in the lawsuit but was later dismissed because of regulations and a Supreme Court ruling that a generic company cannot be sued if the brand name company does not first change product labelling.

Warnings about the increased risk of suicidal thoughts and behaviour in children and young adults were added to the labels of antidepressants in the US and Europe more than a decade ago.1 In the US, however, labels do not warn of these risks for anyone over 24 years old.

Many consumers have tried to hold drug makers responsible for suicides in adults without success. But the legal team representing Wendy Dolin argued that GSK had artificially inflated the number of suicides and suicide attempts that occurred among people who were given a placebo during clinical trials of paroxetine. They said that this alleged move made the antidepressant look better by comparison, since it appeared to minimise the risk of suicide associated with the drug.

The lawyers also argued that GSK had used averages for all selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) to demonstrate that paroxetine did not raise the risk of suicide in adults aged over 24. Court documents also indicated that paroxetine displayed a much higher risk than all but one of the SSRI drugs.

Wendy Dolin declared the verdict “a great day for consumers.” After the verdict she told the Chicago Tribune, “This for me has not just been about the money. This has always been about awareness [of] a health issue, and the public has to be aware of this.”

Healy, who spearheaded the campaign to upgrade suicide warnings on antidepressants and testified as an expert witness on behalf of Wendy Dolin, said that the findings in the case should prompt the US drug regulator to review the evidence on SSRIs and suicide risk in adults.

“When it becomes so clear cut that a jury finds there is a problem, it suggests the evidence is strong enough to look at the issue,” Healy told The BMJ. “If it’s that clear to the average man on the street, and the FDA [the US Food and Drug Administration] doesn’t do something about it, we have an odd situation.”

GSK, which markets paroxetine under the brand name Paxil in the US, has said that it will appeal the verdict. “GSK maintains that because it did not manufacture or market the medicine ingested by Mr Dolin, it should not be liable,” it said in a statement. “Additionally, the Paxil label provided complete and adequate warnings during the time period relevant to this lawsuit.”

GSK added, “The scientific evidence does not establish that paroxetine causes suicide, suicide attempts, self-harm, or suicidal thinking in adult patients. In 2007, FDA revised the labelling for the entire class of SSRI drugs (including generic paroxetine and Paxil). The label includes statements that studies did not show an increased risk of suicidality (attempts or ideation) in adults over the age of 24, and that there appeared to be a protective effect in adults over 64.”

References

The Dolin Trial… Glenmullen Enters The Fray..


Thursday, March 30, 2017

Dolin Vs GSK – Glenmullen Nails It!

On Tuesday a series of video depositions were aired to the jury. Sadly, I have no access to the videos and cannot directly report on them. Thankfully, GSK’s lawyer, Todd Davis, has provided fabulous entertainment akin to a desperately sad clown. Yesterday Davis ineffectively cross-examined the plaintiff’s next expert witness, Dr. Joseph Glenmullen.

Dr. Glenmullen is yet another thorn in the side of GSK. He has previously served as expert witness in many Paxil lawsuits, and, just like Dr. David Healy, is disliked by GSK and their King &  Spalding attorneys. Both Glenmullen and Healy were subjected to GSK’s pre-trial circus in which GSK filed motion after motion arguing that these renowned doctors should not give evidence at this trial. GSK’s attempts were denied.

After yesterday, I can vividly see why GSK opposed Glenmullen as an expert. In short, Glenmullen ran circles around Davis. More on this further on down this blog post.

Glenmullen detailed Stewart Dolin’s medical notes and told the jury the akathisia Stewart experienced occurred the last time he was prescribed Paxil. This was six days before Stewart’s Paxil-induced death. During these six days, Stewart showed increased signs of agitation, just as he did when he was previously prescribed Zoloft years ago. In fact, when the Zoloft dose was increased, Stewart’s adverse drug reaction (akathisia) worsened. When Stewart stopped taking Zoloft, his agitation subsided. Sadly for Stewart and his survivors, when he last took Paxil his adverse drug reaction ended in death. Akathisia, as Glenmullen stated yesterday, is “a drug-induced reaction, a compulsion to kill yourself.” Glenmullen added that a death such as this is referred to “as a paroxetine-induced accident, not a suicide. It’s paroxetine. It’s the label that didn’t warn that is the cause.”

Regarding GSK’s supposed adult suicide warning on the Paxil labeling, Glenmullen clearly nailed it. Referring to the 2010 Black Box warning displayed in court, Glenmullen told the jury how there was explicit language that short-term studies did not show an increase in the risk of suicidality with antidepressants compared to sugar pills in adults beyond age 24. He also pointed out the sentence, “Depression and certain other psychiatric disorders are themselves associated with increases in risk of suicide.” He explained to the jury, “…What that tells me as a practicing psychiatrist is that if I’m treating a 57-year old patient and I put them on Paxil, Paxil couldn’t make them worse. Paxil couldn’t make them suicidal. It would be, and it says explicitly, their depression or other psychiatric condition.”

Glenmullen further noted the black box warning is “really bad” because it implies the suicide warning is just for children, ergo a doctor treating an adult could not warn about a potential risk of suicide because the labeling suggests there is only a suicidality risk among children taking Paxil.

The jury was informed that the labeling was written in such a way so that doctors would not only NOT know about the adult suicide risk, doctors would actually increase the dose because they would assume worsening of depression and/or new disturbing behaviors had nothing to do with Paxil.

Glenmullen added, “And here’s another dimension to it. If the patient gets worse and it might be the drug, what do you do? You take them off the drug to see. If they get worse and it couldn’t be the drug but it’s the depression, what do you do? You increase the drug, which is going to worsen the risk. So it’s very dangerous. And that’s why, in my opinion, it’s really this lack of a warning that’s responsible for his (Stewart Dolin’s) death.”

Glenmullen told the jury he is “100% certain” that “Mr. Dolin’s was a “paroxetine-induced, Paxil-label-induced death.”


Cross-examination by King & Spalding’s Resident Clown

As per his norm, Davis repeatedly tried but failed to discredit the witness. He attempted to catch out Glenmullen with answers Glenmullen provided in various testimonies, including testimony that was more than 11 years ago!

A spectator in the court told me, “You should have seen the spectacle created by GSK when it came time to do their cross.  They were so unorganized with their multiple binders that the jury started to laugh.”

Davis also went down the route of asking Glenmullen how much he was paid to give expert opinions in previous Paxil litigation. Leaves me wondering how much Todd Davis has been paid to defend one of the most controversial drugs in history. Further, I wonder whether he and his law team view their thousands of “settlements”as victory.

In what world is it viewed as a success to place gagging orders on families of Paxil victims so that the truth about the dangerous product is hidden?

Thus far, Davis has done a fine job of entertaining both spectators and jurors alike. Today’s Davis looks more like a sad clown than the smug clown who skipped into court three weeks ago. So, there you have it: King & Spalding attorneys seem to work well together if one considers their joint performance mere entertainment. Sad clown Davis and his jack-in-the-box sidekick, Andrew Bayman, will continue their lame cross-examination of Glenmullen today.

Bob Fiddaman