What Did They Prescribe Keith Flint?


“…During this period, Flint said he had had depression and formed a worrying dependence on prescription drugs.

“I’d line up rows of pills and just take them and take them and I’d lose track of how many until I passed out,” he told The Times in 2009…..”

https://www.bbc.com/news/entertainment-arts-47442312

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/obituaries/2019/03/04/keith-flint-energetic-singer-indie-dance-band-prodigy-obituary/

“…..In person Flint was disarmingly charming and gentle. He admitted that during the band’s hiatus, from the late 1990s, he had “got bang into coke, weed, drinking a lot”, as well as prescription drugs which had exacerbated suicidal thoughts (he believed himself to be on the autistic spectrum)….”

 

“…in 2003, and said he suffered from depression, forming a dependence on prescription drugs….”

https://popculture.com/music/2019/03/04/the-prodigy-vocalist-keith-flint-found-dead-49/

 

Celebrities dying from prescription drug overdoses, and polypharmacy, seems to be an epidemic. Of course, it’s been an epidemic among ‘common people/non celebrities’ like me and you for decades. I grew up with the music of the Prodigy, so it’s sad for me to hear that Keith Flint has killed himself.

I wonder what his doctor/psychiatrist pushed on him over the years.

God knows.

RIP Keith,

 

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Is Giving Anti-Depressants To Teens A bad Idea ?


“..The study looked at the average effect of anti-depressants rather than how they worked for individuals, and the researchers said the findings might not apply to use of the drugs over the longer term…”

 

Great documentary from the acclaimed ‘the doctor who gave up drugs’ series (see below), about the dangers of anti-depressants in kids. It has been established for a long time now that SSRI anti-depressants are unsafe for kids, but what about their use in the adult population?

Interesting segment from David Healy discussing the raw data on Seroxat in teens (see first video below). It was because of the actions of people like David Healy that Seroxat was never officially approved for use in teens in the UK. If Glaxo had gotten their way, it’s possible that Glaxo would have pushed Seroxat for a licence for kids in the UK. This would have meant more SSRI induced teen suicides.

The most interesting segment for me was the part with Andrea Cipriani, the researcher who recently analyzed a meta-analysis of studies on SSRI’s, which made waves in the media not too long ago.

Back in February, Cipriani (see second video down) said that ‘anti-depressants are effective for moderate to severe major depression in adults’. However as Dr David Healy points out, the studies that Cipriani made his analysis on, were mostly ghost written articles.

Cipriani did not study the raw data, therefore his analysis is inherently skewed. He doesn’t mention this in the many media articles he appeared in to promote this study.; he only addresses it because David Healy brought it up. It seems to me that doctors like Cipriani are merely agents of PR for psychiatry (and indeed by default then- the drug companies) than patient advocates. Every few years psychiatry needs to re-establish its dominance of the mental health paradigm.

It’s just marketing.

Why do academics like Cipriani not demand to see the raw data from the drug companies?

Why do they mislead the public?

Why does Cipriani (and indeed Carmine Pariante) not mention also that his analysis was based on very short term studies (and that these studies are not raw data studies), and that safety and effectiveness in long term use in adults has not been established? (This despite the fact that people end up on these drugs for years, sometimes decades).

I feel also that any time Carmine Pariante is interviewed on TV he should be forced to mention his links to drug companies:

His links to GSK  alone are shameful considering GSK’s vast criminality and harm to consumers and patients over the decades.

“…Dr Carmine Pariante has received Funds for a member of staff and funds for research. Professor Pariante’s research on depression and inflammation is supported by: the grants ‘Persistent Fatigue Induced by Interferon alpha: A New Immunological Model for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome’ (MR/J002739/1) and ‘Immunopsychiatry: a consortium to test the opportunity for immunotherapeutics in psychiatry’ (MR/L014815/1; together with GSK), from the Medical Research Council (UK); the National Institute for HealthResearch (NIHR) Mental Health Biomedical Research Centre in Mental Health at South London and Maudsley NHS Foundati on Trust and King’s College London; by Johnson & Johnson as part of a programme of research on depression and inflammation; and by a Wellcome Trust led consortium that also include Johnson & Johnson, GSK and Lundbeck…”

 

I don’t trust Andrea Cipriani, I don’t think he is being honest.

I also don’t trust Carmine Pariante either, however I think he is more misguided than anything else.

Anti-depressants don’t save lives.

Doctors like David Healy save lives.

Doctors like Pariante and Cipriani help drug companies to extinguish them..

 

 

Dutch Seroxat User- Gerard Eggebeen- Wins Case Against GSK For Seroxat Side Effects..


Note: If you are reading this Gerard, please e-mail me on truthman30@gmail.com

I would love to chat with you.

Thanks

Opmerking: als je dit leest, stuur me dan een e-mail op truthman30@gmail.com

Ik zou graag met je chatten.

Bedankt

 

Gerard_Eggebeen

 

“..Afterwards you start thinking and looking back at your life, suddenly the penny fell: It is not my nature to be aggressive or anxious.” – Gerard Eggebeen

 

Gerard Eggebeen (32) used Seroxat for years. First prescribed it in his teens for depression, and then suffering serious side effects for years, he recently successfully sued GlaxoSmithKline and won.

The verdict of the judge only caused a brief moment of happiness. “Imagine the world as colorless, everything is gray and matt and nothing makes sense, that’s how I feel every day.” Gerard has little hope that he will ever get rid of his depression again. His struggle against the pharmaceutical giant keeps him going.

Mission

Since Gerard knows what damage seroxat has caused him, he sees it as his mission to get justice for himself and others.

“I will not rest before this mess is for everyone under eighteen of the market and people who have suffered from it experience a sense of justice,” he says. “The idea that someone is sitting somewhere in a skyscraper at GSK, who now knows what they have done to people…”

See these articles in Dutch (use google translate to get an ok gist of it in English) for more:

https://translate.google.com/translate?sl=auto&tl=en&js=y&prev=_t&hl=en&ie=UTF-8&u=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.rtlnieuws.nl%2Fnederland%2Fgerard-won-rechtszaak-tegen-farmaciereus-ik-stop-niet-voor-deze-troep-van-de-markt-is&edit-text=

https://tmgonlinemedia.nl/consent/consent/?return=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.telegraaf.nl%2Fnieuws%2F2178034%2Fgerard-eggebeen-raakte-voorgoed-beschadigd-door-antidepressivum&clienttime=1529695763335&version=5&guid=c9395a01-3f3e-3664-7d48-ff8667993f2c&detect=true

 

 

 

People Write Into People’s Pharmacy About Paxil/Seroxat Suicide..


“….One person wrote about her son: “He was a 35-year-old young man with everything to live for, good job, happily married, no financial problems. He was experiencing some anxiety and chest pains and saw a doctor, who prescribed Paxil. Three days later, my son committed suicide. Something needs to be done to stop this from happening to others….’’

http://www.journalnow.com/zzstyling/pharmacy/people-s-pharmacy-can-antidepressants-lead-to-suicide/article_227a9814-b1e1-52af-ad03-25ee0c20f223.html

What Did They Prescribe Lil Peep?


“…”I suffer from depression and some days I wake up and I’m like, ‘F***, I wish I didn’t wake up’. That was part of why I moved to California, trying to get away from the place that was doing that to me, and the people I was around.

“I realised it was just myself – it’s a chemical imbalance in my brain,” he added at the time.”

http://www.mirror.co.uk/3am/celebrity-news/lil-peep-autopsy-results-11534849

 

Lil Peep was an American rapper who overdosed on Wednesday night, November 15, at age 21. Prescription drugs such as Xanax were mentioned a lot in his lyrics and his songs contain numerous references to drugs, prescription drugs in particular. It’s sad to see a life cut short at 21, but Lil Peep is representative of the generation who psychiatry has overdosed and over-diagnosed. His death is one of many.

In one article- from Pitch-Fork- Lil Peep mentions that his ‘mental illness’ is all down to a ‘chemical imbalance’. It’s hard to believe that the drug company created- chemical imbalance theory- is still doing the rounds. A tech savvy millennial like Lil Peep would have only needed to do a quick google search to see that the chemical imbalance theory has long been debunked, and even psychiatrists are backing away from it now. Nevertheless, it seems that the the allure of this myth to those looking for a chemical cure to their despair is as potent as ever. This, of course, means tons of business for the drug companies and their psychiatric puppets… and much harm to patients.

It will be interesting to see what psychiatric drugs were prescribed to this talented young man, and in what way did they contribute to deleting his young life and potential.

RIP Lil Peep…

http://people.com/music/lil-peep-dead-possible-xanax-overdose/

 

Based on information [police] were told and evidence that was found in the tour bus, they had evidence of a possible drug overdose, most likely from Xanax,” Sgt. Dugan says, adding that an official cause of death will be released by the medical examiner after toxicology reports. “Based on evidence, there was drug paraphernalia found inside the bus and some narcotics.”

https://soundcloud.com/antidepressants/another

Peter C Gøtzsche : Antidepressants increase the risk of suicide, violence and homicide at all ages


http://www.bmj.com/content/358/bmj.j3697/rr-4
Feature Medicine and the Media

Antidepressants and murder: case not closed

BMJ 2017; 358 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.j3697 (Published 02 August 2017) Cite this as: BMJ 2017;358:j3697

Antidepressants increase the risk of suicide, violence and homicide at all ages

The FDA admitted in 2007 that SSRIs can cause madness at all ages and that the drugs are very dangerous; otherwise daily monitoring wouldn’t be needed: “Families and caregivers of patients should be advised to look for the emergence of such symptoms on a day-to-day basis, since changes may be abrupt” … “All patients being treated with antidepressants for any indication should be monitored appropriately and observed closely for clinical worsening, suicidality, and unusual changes in behavior, especially during the initial few months of a course of drug therapy, or at times of dose changes, either increases or decreases. The following symptoms, anxiety, agitation, panic attacks, insomnia, irritability, hostility, aggressiveness, impulsivity, akathisia (psychomotor restlessness), hypomania, and mania, have been reported in adult and pediatric patients being treated with antidepressants” (1).

Such daily monitoring is, however, a fake fix. People cannot be monitored every minute and many have committed SSRI-induced suicide or homicide within a few hours after everyone thought they were perfectly okay.

As the published trial literature related to suicidality and aggression on antidepressants is unreliable, we looked at 64,381 pages of clinical study reports (70 trials) we got from the European Medicines Agency. We showed for the first time that SSRIs in comparison with placebo increase aggression in children and adolescents, odds ratio 2.79 (95% CI 1.62 to 4.81) (2). This is an important finding considering the many school shootings where the killers were on SSRIs.

In a systematic review of placebo-controlled trials in adult healthy volunteers, we showed that antidepressants double the occurrence of events that the FDA has defined as possible precursors to suicide and violence, odds ratio 1.85 (95% CI 1.11 to 3.08)(3). The number needed to treat to harm one healthy adult person was only 16 (95% CI 8 to 100).

Based on the clinical study reports, we showed that adverse effects that increase the risk of suicide and violence were 4-5 times more common with duloxetine than with placebo in trials in middle-aged women with stress urinary incontinence (4). There were also more women on duloxetine who experienced a core or potential psychotic event, relative risk RR 2.25 (95% CI 1.06 to 4.81). The number needed to harm was only seven. It would have been quite impossible to demonstrate how dangerous duloxetine is, if we had only had access to published research. In accordance with our findings, the FDA has previously announced that women who were treated with duloxetine for incontinence in the open-label extension phase of the clinical studies had 2.6 times more suicide attempts than other women of the same age (5).

Looking at precursor events to suicide and violence is just like looking at prognostic factors for heart disease. We say that increased cholesterol, smoking and inactivity increase the risk of heart attacks and heart deaths and therefore recommend people to do something about it. Psychiatric leaders, however, routinely try to get away with untenable arguments. Many say, for example, that antidepressants can be given safely to children arguing that there were no more suicides in the trials, only more suicidal events, as if there was no relation between the two, although we all know that a suicide starts with suicidal thoughts, followed by preparations and one or more attempts. The same can be said about homicide. It can no longer be doubted that antidepressants are dangerous and can cause suicide and homicide at any age (5-7). It is absurd to use drugs for depression that increase the risk of suicide and homicide when we know that cognitive behavioural therapy can halve the risk of suicide in patients who have been admitted after a suicide attempt (8) and when psychotherapy does not increase the risk of murder.

References

1. FDA. Antidepressant use in children, adolescents, and adults. http://www.fda.gov/drugs/drugsafety/informationbydrugclass/ucm096273.htm.
2. Sharma T, Guski LS, Freund N, Gøtzsche PC. Suicidality and aggression during antidepressant treatment: systematic review and meta-analyses based on clinical study reports. BMJ 2016;352:i65.
3. Bielefeldt AØ, Danborg PB, Gøtzsche PC. Precursors to suicidality and violence on antidepressants: systematic review of trials in adult healthy volunteers. J R Soc Med 2016;109:381-392.
4. Maund E, Guski LS, Gøtzsche PC. Considering benefits and harms of duloxetine for treatment of stress urinary incontinence: a meta-analysis of clinical study reports. CMAJ 2017;189:E194-203.
5. Gøtzsche PC. Deadly psychiatry and organised denial. Copenhagen: People’s Press; 2015.
6. Healy D. Let them eat Prozac. New York: New York University Press; 2004.
7. Breggin P. Medication madness. New York: St. Martin’s Griffin; 2008.
8. Gøtzsche PC, Gøtzsche PK. Cognitive behavioural therapy halves the risk of repeated suicide attempts: systematic review. J R Soc Med 2017 (in press).

Competing interests: No competing interests

Psychiatry Has Destroyed Sinead O’ Connor..


 

https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100006731236998

Irish singer, Sinead O’ Connor, has hit the headlines again, with an impassioned and heartbreaking cry for help to her family through an online video. In distressing and harrowing Facebook posts over the last few weeks, Sinead has been crying out for her family to reach out to her. From the videos and messages she has been posting for almost two years now, it is obvious that Sinead is in a very bad state, and has been for at least a decade, but what has her led her to this crisis?

How did one of the most talented, and famous, female singers- in the world- end up alone, isolated, and severely ‘mentally ill’ to the point of suicide, in a motel in the outskirts of New Jersey?

Sinead, now 50, has been ‘under the care’ of psychiatry (that’s if you could call it ‘care’), and under the ‘treatment’ of psychiatric drugs for years, and if her recent video is anything to go by, the effects of this (mis) treatment have utterly destroyed her mental and physical health, her relationships with family and friends, and possibly her career, and her life too.

Sinead is one of milions (globally) destroyed by the polypharmacy medication merry go round of psychiatric drug treatment. Those of us that have been through this system of psychiatric drugging and mis-treatment (and suffered side effects which made our condition worse), know all too well the dire consequences of it. It’s difficult to see, or to understand, the damage been done to you while you are in it. The meds keep you sedated, and suppressed, so much so that you can be completely unaware. Tragically, people like Sinead  end up stuck in the psychiatric system, not realizing that the system itself is damaging them, but so vulnerable that they are helpless to get out of its grip.

Robert Whitaker’s book ‘Anatomy of an epidemic‘ details the results of mass drugging of the population, and the outcomes are not good, in fact they are extremely grim, particularly for those who have been medicated long term…

 

 “…Whitaker has persuaded me that American psychiatry, in collusion with the pharmaceutical industry, may be perpetrating the biggest case of iatrogenesis—harmful medical treatment–in history….” (Scientific American)

 

Leonie Fennell did an excellent post about Sinead and her experiences with psychiatry 4 years ago-

 

“….Here’s a recent clip of Sinead O’Connor speaking on her treatment by an Irish Psychiatrist.

Sinead says that she was misdiagnosed with Bipolar Disorder and subsequently prescribed ‘toxic’ doses of Lamictal (400mgs) and Amitriptyline (200mgs). She describes her psychiatrist as a horrible ‘b’ who did not inform her of the side-effects while on the drugs, or while coming off them.

Dishing out the pills is always the first-line treatment for people that psychiatry see as ‘abnormal’. Sinead O’Connor is perfectly normal by the way, and fabulously outspoken; she didn’t need fixing! Strange that dangerous drugs can be given to a person for years for an ‘illness’ which didn’t exist. Never mind all that comes with that, not least the weight gain, depersonalization, worsening depression and huge expense; would any other profession get away with such sloppy work? Reported adverse effects of these drugs on the RxISK website: Lamictal and Amitriptyline.

The full video can be viewed here….”

 

 



 

In the video above, Sinead seems to be aware that the medications she’s being prescribed are toxic, as she details the various side effects she has had over the years, however it seems that she is stuck in the psychiatric system, without realizing that it is in fact- the psychiatric system that is the problem.

In another article from 2013 she says –

https://truthman30.wordpress.com/2015/12/02/sinead-oconnors-past-psychiatric-drug-use/

 “They are extremely debilitating drugs. Tiring to the extreme. Ironically, extremely depressing. They can cause suicidal or self-harm type thinking. They can mess up your menstrual cycle very badly and cause you to be incapacitated for a week before.

“[They] f**k up your liver, your kidneys, your eyes, your appetite, your entire way of thinking and generally your entire life..”


Sinead will only get better when she gets away from the psychiatric system and the regime of drugging that the psychiatrists subject patients to. The psychiatric survivor movement is now global, and I hope that Sinead doesn’t end up just another casualty of mass psychiatric drugging. I hope she gets off the psych drugs, and then she can start her journey of healing.

If you haven’t heard the song ‘Troy’ from Sinead’s first album – The Lion and The Cobra- you really should, it’s spine-tingling. It’s Sinead at the height of her creative power, only 19 at the time. Compare that with the video from her facebook cry for help -above (30 years later), and bear witness to the damage that over a decade of psychiatric ill- treatment and psychiatric drugging does to an individual.


Should A Proven Felon And Criminal (GSK) Have Any Credibility At All In A Court Of Law?…


Think about it..

Would you trust the word of a convicted felon and fraudster? one that had to pay the department of justice 3 Billion dollars for fraud, bribery and ‘harm to patients’ offenses dating back many years? Would you trust the word of a sociopathic organization like this? It would be absurd to afford GSK any credibility in trustworthiness and truth wouldn’t it?

See Whistle-Blower Greg Thorpe’s hair raising legal complaint about GSK here-

https://truthman30.wordpress.com/2015/08/28/whistleblower-greg-thorpes-7th-ammended-complaint/


 

https://www.law360.com/articles/950287/reed-smith-atty-s-doctor-knew-of-suicide-risk-gsk-says

 

Reed Smith Atty’s Doctor Knew Of Suicide Risk, GSK Says

Law360, New York (August 1, 2017, 10:12 PM EDT) — GlaxoSmithKline pressed an Illinois federal court Monday to undo a $3 million verdict in favor of the widow of a Reed Smith LLP lawyer who committed suicide after taking generic Paxil, saying the prescribing doctor’s knowledge of the risks relieved the drugmaker of responsibility.
Wendy Dolin sued GSK in 2012, two years after her husband Stewart stepped in front of a train in downtown Chicago. Stewart Dolin had struggled with anxiety and depression off and on, and began taking paroxetine just a few days before his death. A jury this spring awarded $2 million for wrongful death and $1 million for pain and suffering in the days before he took his life.

Glaxo’s new brief elaborates on earlier arguments it has made in favor of a new trial, after Wendy Dolin urged against the move in recent weeks. The drugmaker said that the trial testimony of Stewart Dolin’s prescribing doctor revealed that he believed paroxetine could increase Dolin’s suicidality. Via the learned-intermediary doctrine, Glaxo said, that would mean it had washed its hands of the matter.

“Plaintiff fails to identify a single Illinois decision holding that a manufacturer can be held liable for failure to warn” in a suit like this, the company said.

The trial testimony of prescribing doctor Martin Sachman “shows that he was aware of the very risk that mattered to him when deciding to prescribe paroxetine for Mr. Dolin.”

GSK included an excerpt of his questioning where he was asked, “When you reinitiated paroxetine for Mr. Dolin in 2010, you went over with him the fact that he needed to be on the [lookout] for the signs and symptoms of agitation, increased restlessness or insomnia, panic attacks, worsening depression, or suicidal thoughts or behavior after he started the medication?”

Sachman replied, “Right.”

The company pushed back against Wendy Dolin’s claim that the risk Sachman was saying he was aware of was the obvious depression-related suicide risk, not a medication-related risk; Dolin “selectively cites” Sachman’s testimony to reach that conclusion, the drugmaker said, and didn’t try to push back against Sachman’s agreement that he didn’t realize that a 2006 label that warned him properly about what happened to Dolin was later changed before Dolin’s death.

GSK also said its hands were tied because drug regulators would not allow the company to use the specific warning language that it wanted. The label for the drug changed more than once between 2006 and 2010 as the U.S. Food and Drug Administration examined it.

And the company also took issue with a myriad of jury instructions that it says didn’t fully separate out different elements necessary for liability.

According to Wendy Dolin, the doctor testified that when he decided to prescribe the drug he relied on the 2010 Paxil label, which didn’t warn that Paxil could lead to suicidality in adults over 24. The doctor also testified that if GSK had warned of that risk, he wouldn’t have prescribed paroxetine to Dolin in 2010, Wendy Dolin said.

But Dolin says GSK never proposed her desired warning: A short statement that taking Paxil is associated with suicidality in adults over 24. “Since GSK never attempted to insert that simple warning anywhere into the Paxil label, GSK cannot meet its burden of providing ‘clear evidence’ that the FDA would have rejected such a labeling change, especially when the only FDA expert to testify at trial rejected that notion,” Dolin said.

Dolin argued the company had failed to alert drug regulators that research showed increased suicide risk in adults. With a short exception, the potential for suicide in adults was left off, and doctors were left uninformed, the suit said.

The FDA also invited GSK to discuss the inclusion of language specific to adult suicidality in the label at a formal meeting in 2007, but the company didn’t take the agency up on its offer, Dolin said.

Representatives for the parties were not immediately available for comment Tuesday.

Wendy Dolin is represented by R. Brent Wisner, Michael Baum, Bijan Esfandiari and Frances Phares of Baum Hedlund Aristei & Goldman PC, and David Rapoport and Matthew Sims of Rapoport Law Offices PC.

GSK is represented by Andrew Bayman, Todd Davis, Ursula Henninger and Heather Howard of King & Spalding LLP and Alan Gilbert and Anders Wick of Dentons.

The case is Dolin v. SmithKline Beecham Corp. et al., case number 1:12-cv-06403, in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois.

–Additional reporting by Emily Field. Editing by Brian Baresch.

What Did They Prescribe Chester Bennington?


Petrusich-Chester-Bennington-1

 

http://www.eonline.com/news/868229/the-dark-side-of-linkin-park-s-chester-bennington-alcoholism-and-depression-inspired-and-plagued-singer-shadowing-his-massive-success

 

“…Meeting his second wife helped pull him out of a period of “absolute self-destruction,” he told Bullz-Eye.com in 2009 while promoting Out of Ashes. “I don’t know when to stop when I’m in that mode. I’ll go through a gallon of Jack Daniels and down some antidepressants in one night and keep on going. I just hated my life at one point. I loved my band, career and friends, but when I got home from tour, I couldn’t deal with stuff. I would just begin drinking.”

 

RIP Chester..

 

https://www.theguardian.com/music/2017/jul/21/chester-bennington-obituary

Chester Bennington obituary

Vocalist with the band Linkin Park whose sound was emblematic of the nu-metal genre

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Linkin Park’s Chester Bennington dies aged 41

The death of Chester Bennington, vocalist with the rap and nu-metal band Linkin Park, at the age of 41, curtails a brilliantly successful career that brought a string of awards and multimillion-selling albums and singles. Linkin Park enjoyed enormous and immediate acclaim with their debut album Hybrid Theory (2000), released on Warner Bros after the band had been rejected by several labels. The combination of Mike Shinoda’s rapping and Bennington’s soaring, impassioned singing became the band’s instant focal point, with the group’s metallic thunder enhanced by edgy electronic treatments. Their sound became emblematic of the nu-metal genre, alongside like-minded artists such as Korn and Limp Bizkit.

Hybrid Theory sold nearly 5m copies in its first year and to date has sold more than 20m, and reached No 2 on the US chart and No 4 in the UK. The singles Crawling, One Step Closer and In the End became radio favourites, receiving heavy airplay on MTV, and in 2002 Crawling won a Grammy for best hard rock performance. The album Reanimation (2002) comprised remixes of Hybrid Theory songs plus additional material, and was another international multimillion-seller.

When the band released Meteora in 2003, following intensive touring in the US, including dates with their own multi-artist Projekt Revolution tour, it shot to the top of the US and UK album charts and spawned a fresh batch of hit singles, including Somewhere I Belong, Breaking the Habit and Numb, the last of these an anthem of Bennington’s disconnection from the world. The album went on to sell more than 10m copies. In 2004, Linkin Park teamed up with Jay-Z on the EP Collision Course, mixing rap with metal; the track Numb/Encore, splicing together the band’s Numb with Jay-Z’s Encore, went to 20 on the US singles chart and 14 in the UK. In 2005 it won a Grammy for best rap/sung collaboration.

But while his music provided a cathartic outlet, Bennington had experienced an assortment of emotional and drug-related issues since childhood. He was a close friend of Chris Cornell, the lead singer of Soundgarden, who killed himself in May, and wrote a heartfelt posthumous letter to Cornell. Bennington was found dead at his home in California on what would have been Cornell’s 53rd birthday.

Bennington was born in Phoenix, Arizona. His mother, Susan Elaine Johnson, was a nurse, and his father, Lee Russell Bennington, a police detective who often worked on child abuse cases. They divorced when he was 11, after which his father gained custody of Chester. He had two older sisters and an older half-brother, Brian. Since his father often worked double shifts, Chester frequently found himself at home alone. He fell into a pattern of drug and alcohol abuse, and, he once told Metal Hammer magazine, “dropped so much acid I’m surprised I can still speak. I’d smoke a bunch of crack, do a bit of meth and just sit there and freak out. Then I’d smoke opium to come down.”

His emotional state was further affected by the fact that he suffered sexual abuse by an older friend between the ages of seven and 13. “It destroyed my self-confidence,” he told Kerrang! in 2008. “Like most people, I was too afraid to say anything. I didn’t want people to think that I was gay or that I was lying.” He was also bullied at school.

He found some respite in drawing and songwriting, and was a fan of Depeche Mode and Stone Temple Pilots. At 17 he moved in with his mother, and worked at Burger King while attempting to become a musician. His first group, Sean Dowdell and His Friends?, made a three-track cassette in 1993, after which Bennington and Dowdell formed the alternative-rock band Grey Daze, who released three albums during the 1990s.

Bennington married Samantha Olit in 1996, quit Grey Daze in 1998 and moved to Los Angeles to further his musical career. He auditioned for a band called Xero, and when he was hired as vocalist he completed the original line-up of what then became Linkin Park (a pun on Lincoln Park in Santa Monica), alongside Shinoda, Brad Delson, Dave Farrell, Rob Bourdon and Joe Hahn.

In 2005 Bennington put together a side project, Dead By Sunrise, featuring musicians from Orgy and the Street Drum Corps and comprising songs he considered “darker and moodier than anything I’d come up with for the band”. In 2009 they released their only album, Out of Ashes, which scraped into the US Top 30.

Linkin Park returned in 2007 with the album Minutes to Midnight, co-produced with Rick Rubin and marking a deliberate step towards a more mainstream rock sound. This delivered the big hit singles What I’ve Done, Bleed It Out and Shadow of the Day, which all scored heavily in the American alt and rock charts. New Divide, from the soundtrack compilation album Transformers – Revenge of the Fallen (2009), gave them another major hit. Their subsequent albums, A Thousand Suns (2010) and Living Things (2012), saw sales falling way below their earlier peaks, but they still delivered big hit singles including The Catalyst, Waiting for the End and the anthemic Burn It Down.

In 2013 Bennington joined Stone Temple Pilots after they fired the vocalist Scott Weiland, and, after recording the EP High Rise, stayed with them until 2015. “I got to create and perform with one of the greatest rock bands of our generation, that had so much influence on me growing up,” he said afterwards. He was back with Linkin Park for The Hunting Party (2014), on which they tacked back towards a heavier rock sound. One More Light (2017) was, by comparison with the group’s original sound, virtually a pop record. “It’s a great record, we love it,” insisted Bennington to hostile critics, and the album shot to the top of the US Billboard chart.

Bennington had tackled his addiction issues with some success, admitting falling off the wagon in 2005 when he divorced, but getting clean again in 2006 when he married Talinda Bentley, a schoolteacher and former model. In the run-up to the release of One More Light, he seemed optimistic and positive, saying that he had shaken off the depression he had felt two years earlier. “I know exactly who I am, I know exactly what I’m made of and I’m totally happy with it,” he said.

He is survived by Talinda and their children, Tyler Lee, Lily and Lila; by a son, Draven Sebastian, from his first marriage; and by two sons, Jaime and Isaiah, from a relationship with Elka Brand.

Chester Charles Bennington, singer and songwriter, born 20 March 1976; died 20 July 2017