GSK To Face Trial Over Reed Smith Partner’s Suicide


Scott Flaherty, The Am Law Daily January 13, 2016    | 0 Comments

GlaxoSmithKline headquaters.
GlaxoSmithKline headquaters.
Credit: Maxwell Hamilton via Wikimedia Commons

More than five years ago, Reed Smith partner Stewart Dolin killed himself at a Chicago train station, leaving behind a wife, two children and a sucessful career. Now his widow has moved a step closer to trial in a case accusing GlaxoSmithKline LLC of hiding the suicide risks of its blockbuster antidepressant Paxil and contributing to Dolin’s death.

Wendy Dolin has been pursuing negligence and fraud claims against GSK since August 2012. About two years earlier, in July 2010, Stewart Dolin went to Chicago Transit Authority station on his lunch break and died after stepping in front of an oncoming train. A medical examiner deemed the death a suicide, and an autopsy confirmed the presence of a generic version of GSK’s antidepressant Paxil, according to court documents.

On Tuesday U.S. District Judge James Zagel in Chicago declined to rule on a pair of motions that GSK’s defense lawyers at King & Spalding and Dentons filed last year, hoping to scuttle the case before trial. In a brief docket entry, the judge explained that he won’t make a decision on GSK’s summary judgment motions before a trial scheduled to begin on Sept. 19.

Stewart Dolin, pictured right in an undated photo, was 57 and a co-chair of Reed Smith’s corporate and securities group when he died.

In the lawsuit, Wendy Dolin’s lawyers at Los Angeles-based personal injury firm Baum Hedlund Aristei Goldman allege that the suicide came just six days after the Reed Smith partner began taking a generic version of Paxil to treat anxiety and depression.

The complaint accuses GSK of failing to include a warning on Paxil’s labeling that the drug has ties to suicidal behavior in adults. At the time of Dolin’s death, according to the suit, Paxil’s labeling only referenced an association with suicide risk among people aged 24 and younger. Dolin’s lawyers, led by Baum Hedlund’s Brent Wisner, also lodged broader accusations that GSK knew about Paxil’s association with suicide in adults and deliberately concealed that information for decades.

The suit also initially made related claims against Mylan Inc., the drug company that manufactured the generic Paxil that Stewart Dolin actually took. Zagel, however, dismissed Mylan in 2014, finding the claims against the generic maker were preempted by federal drug labeling law.

GSK, defended by Atlanta-based King & Spalding partners Andrew Bayman and Todd Davis and Chicago-based lawyers from Dentons, has denied Dolin’s allegations. The company’s defense lawyers lodged a pair of summary judgment motions in late July, arguing that GSK should be cleared of any liability on multiple grounds.

One of those motions focused on a federal preemption argument. At the time of Stewart Dolin’s suicide, GSK’s lawyers wrote, the company hadn’t been required by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to include warnings about suicide risks associated with Paxil for patients older than 24.

A separate GSK motion seeks to undermine other aspects of the suit, including allegations that Stewart Dolin’s doctor didn’t know about Paxil’s full suicide risks before prescribing it. The defense lawyers also reiterated that Dolin had taken a generic version of Paxil, made by Mylan, before the suicide.

“A plaintiff must establish that it was the defendant’s product that actually caused the alleged harm,” GSK’s legal team wrote in support of the summary judgment motion, which was made publicly available in October. “It remains undisputed that Mr. Dolin never ingested GSK’s product Paxil.”

Dolin’s contested both motions in court, but at a status hearing on Tuesday, Zagel put off his ultimate decision on the issues until sometime after the trial begins.

King & Spalding’s Davis referred a request for comment to GSK. In a statement, a company spokeswoman noted that the company’s summary judgment motions remain pending with the court and that Dolin had not been taking brand-name Paxil.

Baum Hedlund’s Wisner, who represents Dolin, said in an email on Wednesday that he’s encouraged that the judge declined to rule on GSK’s pretrial motions.

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Former GSK Senior Exec, Chris Viehbacher, Embroiled In Scandal At Sanofi (2014)


http://www.cnbc.com/id/102235774?

Bad medicine: Suit claims ‘kickback’ scheme at Sanofi

Wednesday, 3 Dec 2014 | 3:27 PM ET

12

COMMENTSJoin the Discussion

A new lawsuit claims the recently ousted CEO of Sanofi and other executives at the huge drugmaker conducted a scheme in violation of federal law to funnel tens of millions of dollars in kickbacks and other incentives to get the company’s diabetes drugs prescribed and sold.

The whistleblower lawsuit also claims Sanofi CEO Christopher Viehbacher was fired by the company’s board in October “in part, because Defendant Viehbacher was involved in the aforesaid illegal and/or fraudulent activity,” which allegedly went on “over the course of many years.”

Ousted Sanofi CEO Christopher Viehbacher

Eric Piermont | Getty Images
Ousted Sanofi CEO Christopher Viehbacher

The suit filed Wednesday says that Sanofi used contracts that appeared to be for legitimate purposes to direct money to hospitals, doctors and retail pharmacy chains to induce them to purchase and prescribe Sanofi’s diabetes medication. It also claims that “approximately $1 billion is missing from Defendant Sanofi which has not been accounted for.”

Sanofi itself in October cited poor relations between Viehbacher and the board as the reason he was sacked.

Read MoreSanofi ousts CEO after warning on diabetes business

The bombshell new kickback allegations by a Sanofi paralegal named DianePonte—who herself was fired in September after allegedly suffering retaliation for bringing the scheme to light—come two years after the drug company reached an agreement with the Justice Department and several states to pay $109 million to settle claims that it engaged in kickbacks by giving doctors free samples of an arthritis drug as a way to encourage them to buy and prescribe that medication.

Such kickbacks are illegal because they can encourage the prescription of drugs that are covered by federal Medicare and Medicaid insurance programs, and thus have taxpayers foot the bills for medication that might otherwise not have been prescribed.

After that 2012 settlement, Sanofi also had a corporate integrity agreement with the Health and Human Services Department requiring the company to abide by federal health-care laws and to report illegal activities by the company and its employees, Ponte’s suit said. However, a check of HHS’ database of such integrity agreements indicated that pact had not been executed as of yet.

Sanofi on Wednesday indicated it had not yet been served with Ponte’s lawsuit, but in a statement said, “Sanofi does not comment on litigation.”

On Thursday, after reviewing the suit, Sanofi issued a new statement, which said: “Diane Ponte is a disgruntled former employee who is opportunistically attacking our company. Ponte filed for violations of New Jersey state employment law, specifically the New Jersey Conscientious Employee Protection Act (‘CEPA’).”

“The employment law allegations are without merit, and Sanofi will vigorously defend the suit. We take this matter very seriously and will protect our company and our reputation,” Sanofi said.

Ponte’s suit, filed in New Jersey Superior Court in Newark, names as defendants Sanofi, Viehbacher, Sanofi General Counsel Robert DeBerardine and other executives, including Sanofi’s former vice president of its U.S. diabetes business, Dennis Urbaniak, and the ex-assistant vice president of special projects, Raymond Godleski.

“It’s shocking that these people got away with this for so long and then fired this woman for uncovering their wrongdoing,” said Rosemarie Arnold, lawyer for the 53-year-old Ponte. “She was blatantly fired as a result of her whistleblowing activity.”

Hostile work environment alleged

The suit says Sanofi and its managers created a hostile work environment for Ponte after she made her allegations of wrongdoing and created a pretext for her dismissal in September.

The suit said Ponte became aware of the alleged diabetes drug scheme in March 2013, when she received electronic requests for her approval of nine Sanofi contracts worth a total of $34 million—seven contracts with the consulting firm Accenture, and two with the professional services firm Deloitte. Ponte, a 13-year Sanofi veteran, at the time was working in the company’s U.S.headquarters in Bridgewater, New Jersey, in the contracts group, where she was responsible for reviewing contracts.


Views from the cafe-pharma GSK board below:

http://www.cafepharma.com/boards/showthread.php?t=571394

GlaxoSmithKline Anonymous board for GlaxoSmithKline

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#1
Old 12-04-2014, 10:44 PM
Anonymous

Posts: n/a
Default Viehbacher may not be GSK’s White Knight
If there is any truth to these allegations, Viehbacher may not be as available as he seems:

“A new lawsuit claims the recently ousted CEO of Sanofi and other executives at the huge drugmaker conducted a scheme in violation of federal law to funnel tens of millions of dollars in kickbacks and other incentives to get the company’s diabetes drugs prescribed and sold.”
http://www.cnbc.com/id/102235774?

#2
Old 12-05-2014, 06:53 AM
Anonymous

Posts: n/a
Default Re: Viehbacher may not be GSK’s White Knight
Interesting post. If true, CV is yet another executive fraudster among a growing list.
Reply With Quote
#3
Old 12-05-2014, 06:58 AM
Anonymous

Posts: n/a
Default Re: Viehbacher may not be GSK’s White Knight
[quote=Anonymous;5289428]If there is any truth to these allegations, Viehbacher may not be as available as he seems:

“A new lawsuit claims the recently ousted CEO of Sanofi and other executives at the huge drugmaker conducted a scheme in violation of federal law to funnel tens of millions of dollars in kickbacks and other incentives to get the company’s diabetes drugs prescribed and sold.”
http://www.cnbc.com/id/102235774?%5B/QUO

This is from one disgruntled employee. Go back to re posting something useful
Reply With Quote
#4
Old 12-05-2014, 08:51 AM
Anonymous

Posts: n/a
Default Re: Viehbacher may not be GSK’s White Knight
Disgruntled does not necessarily mean wrong. The 2 guys from GSK who were whistleblowers were disgruntled as well, but they weren’t wrong.

Let the courts decide.
Reply With Quote
#5
Old 12-05-2014, 08:17 PM
Anonymous

Posts: n/a
Default Re: Viehbacher may not be GSK’s White Knight
She also claims about $1 billion is missing! That part should be proved/disproved fairly quickly. This isn’t the Pentagon, Sanofi’s accountants must have records somewhere.
Reply With Quote
#6
Old 12-11-2014, 08:12 PM
Anonymous

Posts: n/a
Default Re: Viehbacher may not be GSK’s White Knight
We could use the $ 1b
Reply With Quote
#7
Old 12-12-2014, 05:26 PM
Anonymous

Posts: n/a
Default Re: Viehbacher may not be GSK’s White Knight
“White Knight?!” You racist
Reply With Quote
#8
Old 12-13-2014, 05:26 AM
Anonymous

Posts: n/a
Default Re: Viehbacher may not be GSK’s White Knight
Vie archer is impressive his lack of a morale code have now started a path of destruction at 2 companies.
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2014-1…-baseless.html
Reply With Quote
#9
Old 12-13-2014, 09:24 AM
Anonymous

Posts: n/a
Default Re: Viehbacher may not be GSK’s White Knight
Transparency. Respect for People. Integrity. Patient Focused. Maybe not.
Reply With Quote
#10
Old 12-13-2014, 01:54 PM
Anonymous

Posts: n/a
Default Re: Viehbacher may not be GSK’s White Knight
Quote:
Originally Posted by Anonymous View Post
Transparency. Respect for People. Integrity. Patient Focused. Maybe not.
This guy was hip deep in the fraud at GSK TOO. Just look at the Lauren Stevens trial transcripts and you will know. He belongs in Prison.

#11
Old 12-13-2014, 02:04 PM
Anonymous

Posts: n/a
Default Re: Viehbacher may not be GSK’s White Knight
Ultimately he is as responsible for PF as anyone else.
Reply With Quote
#12
Old 12-14-2014, 08:39 AM
Anonymous

Posts: n/a
Default Re: Viehbacher may not be GSK’s White Knight
Just keeps getting better
Sanofi Is Accused of Using Kickbacks to Encourage Prescribing Diabetes Drugs

According to the complaint, on October 29, 2014, shares of Sanofi fell $2.85 or almost 6% to close at $45.22 on the news of the termination of Chief Executive Officer, Christopher A. Viehbacher. On December 3, 2014, it was reported by various media outlets that a whistleblower lawsuit had been filed by a former Sanofi paralegal. This suit alleges that Viehbacher, along with other executives, violated federal law by funneling tens of millions of dollars in kickbacks and incentives to get the company’s diabetes drugs prescribed and sold. This lawsuit also alleges that Viehbacher was dismissed due to his involvement in the illegal activities, such as kickbacks and incentives, which went on for many years.

The complaint also alleges that Sanofi: (i) was making improper payments to healthcare professionals in connection with the sale of pharmaceutical products in violation of federal law; (ii) lacked adequate internal controls over financial reporting; and (iii) as a result, the company’s public statements were materially false and misleading at all relevant times.
Reply With Quote
#13
Old 12-15-2014, 11:46 AM
Anonymous

Posts: n/a
Default Re: Viehbacher may not be GSK’s White Knight
Quote:
Originally Posted by Anonymous View Post
Just keeps getting better
Sanofi Is Accused of Using Kickbacks to Encourage Prescribing Diabetes Drugs

According to the complaint, on October 29, 2014, shares of Sanofi fell $2.85 or almost 6% to close at $45.22 on the news of the termination of Chief Executive Officer, Christopher A. Viehbacher. On December 3, 2014, it was reported by various media outlets that a whistleblower lawsuit had been filed by a former Sanofi paralegal. This suit alleges that Viehbacher, along with other executives, violated federal law by funneling tens of millions of dollars in kickbacks and incentives to get the company’s diabetes drugs prescribed and sold. This lawsuit also alleges that Viehbacher was dismissed due to his involvement in the illegal activities, such as kickbacks and incentives, which went on for many years.

The complaint also alleges that Sanofi: (i) was making improper payments to healthcare professionals in connection with the sale of pharmaceutical products in violation of federal law; (ii) lacked adequate internal controls over financial reporting; and (iii) as a result, the company’s public statements were materially false and misleading at all relevant times.
who cares, go to the Sanofi thread. we have enough problems with our own leadership

Time Out: Thanks For Reading


Hey there,

I’ve decided that I need to take some time out from blogging for a while, not sure for how long exactly, but as long as I need to, which could be a month or more. Anyhow, thanks for reading and I will be back soon. In the meantime, for those who are interested- The GSK China Bribe Scandal seems to be getting worse, with news out today that China are now accusing GSK of tax dodging to the tune of millions. Of course, to me (and others with an eye on GSK) we have heard all this before from GSK: bribery, tax dodging, executive criminality, breeches of ethics, and harming patients and customers – these crimes are all well documented on this blog and others. GSK’s consistent criminality, and disregard for the law and the health of their customers, is nothing new. I won’t be around for a while- but I’m sure that GSK will continue to behave badly- as they always do.

Catch you all soon.


04S_GSK_CITY_GRAPHICGSK_LOS_RGB

Link to GSK tax dodge in China, from Reuters:

http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/05/19/us-gsk-china-idUSBREA4I06D20140519

GSK dodged millions in China drug tax scam: state media

 

SHANGHAI Mon May 19, 2014 6:00am EDT

 

An employee walks inside a GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) office in Shanghai July 16, 2013. REUTERS/Stringer

An employee walks inside a GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) office in Shanghai July 16, 2013.

Credit: Reuters/Stringer

(Reuters) – A Chinese state-run newspaper has accused British drugmaker GlaxoSmithKline Plc of evading at least 100 million yuan ($16.04 million) in taxes, adding to pressure on the firm which is already struggling with graft charges against executives.

Chinese police on Wednesday said they had charged the former boss of GSK’s China business and other colleagues, in the biggest corruption scandal to hit a foreign company there since four Rio Tinto executives were jailed in 2009.

Although the corruption charges target executives rather than the company itself, the mounting allegations made by Chinese media suggest the drugmaker is far from safe.

The Legal Daily newspaper, run by the ruling Chinese Communist Party’s Political and Legal Committee, reported on Friday that GSK intentionally imported Lamivudine, used to treat HIV as well as hepatitis, at an elevated cost.

Along with using tax loopholes for charitable donations, this helped GSK “avoid over 100 million yuan in import value-added tax and corporate income tax,” the report said.

The report followed less-detailed allegations by state news agency Xinhua saying GSK used transfer pricing to artificially reduce its profits and tax bill in China.

GSK officials in Shanghai and London declined to comment, despite repeated phone, text and email requests from Reuters since Friday. The drugmaker said on Wednesday that the graft charges were “shameful” and that it hoped to reach a resolution to enable it to continue serving Chinese consumers.

Chinese police charged Mark Reilly, the former British boss of GSK’s China business, and other colleagues with corruption last week, after a 10-month probe found the firm made billions of yuan from elaborate schemes to bribe doctors and hospitals.

The allegations against GSK have damaged its reputation and led to an overhaul of operations in what is set to become the world’s second-biggest pharmaceutical market behind the United States within three years, according to consultancy IMS Health.

HIDING PROFITS

The Legal Daily report also said that GSK had avoided import taxes by donating some of the imported drug to support state-backed treatment of the disease, adding GSK could have donated cheaper drugs that it produced at a plant in Suzhou instead.

“The most serious thing is that through this sham charity, GSK blocked the Chinese government making its own generic drugs to treat AIDS, so that it could attain a monopoly over the hepatitis drug market,” the Legal Daily said.

Xinhua also reported earlier that GSK had spent tens of millions of yuan to bribe hospitals to use Lamivudine after it lost patent protection in 2010.

Legal sources and one source with direct knowledge of the GSK investigation have said that Chinese authorities may be looking to charge the company itself, which could put the drugmakers license to operate in China at risk.

($1 = 6.2334 Chinese Yuan)

(Reporting by Adam Jourdan in SHANGHAI, Sui-Lee Wee and Xiaoyi Shao in BEIJING; Editing by Michael Urquhart)

Seroxat Secrets : Seroxat litigation in the UK – important news


http://seroxatsecrets.wordpress.com/2013/02/10/seroxat-litigation-in-the-uk-important-news/

The High Court action against Glaxo isn’t quite over.

There were 500 litigants to start with. This number dropped to about 150.

These 150 people received a letter recently.

And today, I have been sent a copy of this email:

Hi All, If you haven’t already, please can you get in touch with Sarah-Jane Richards at Secure Law to confirm you want to continue in the action and you are happy for her to represent you.  You need to do this and previous correspondence will not count as this involves the instruction of a new law firm…we really need strength in numbers.  Please can you also confirm if you are happy for your email to be added to her list and advise if you are still taking Seroxat and if you are on benefits.

If you’ve got the letter, you’ve got the link.

Use it.

GSK lashes back at British newspaper in Avandia debate


http://wraltechwire.com/gsk-lashes-back-at-british-newspaper-in-avandia-debate/12061525/

Kinda reminds me of the same bullshit they came out with when the BBC exposed the hideous dangers of Seroxat 10 years ago. 

Different company? New Era? New Ethics?

The same bullshit, the same company and the same bullying behavior.

Leopards can’t change their spots.

_____________________________________________________________________________________________

GSK lashes back at British newspaper in Avandia debate

It’s a rarity when major multinational giants taken on – publicly, anyway –  news organizations over how stories are reported.

But GlaxoSmithKline (NYSE: GSK) has taken the proverbial gloves off in a duel with The Guardian newspaper in the U.K.

GSK Playing Hardball With UK Families Over Avandia Litigation,” the newspaper’s report said.

Given GSK’s decision on how to handle Avandia in the U.S. (it’s settling suits), the stance in the U.K. is interesting, to say the least.

The Defense

In a blog post at its website, GSK defended itself and the handling of Avandia cases after The Guardian reported the company will not concede defeat in lawsuits over the controversial diabetes drug.

“GSK response to news article in The Guardian on UK legal proceedings related to Avandia (rosiglitazone),” the blog post headline reads.

“Responding to a news article in The Guardian this morning (Jan. 30) on UK legal proceedings related to our type 2 diabetes medicine Avandia (rosiglitazone), we would like to make the following points:

“We have every sympathy for people with health complications associated with diabetes and those who care for them. However, respecting the UK court process, we are unable to comment on ongoing legal cases

“.We continue to believe that the company acted appropriately and responsibly in its management of Avandia.

“Specifically, it is wrong to suggest that we hid or concealed safety data relating to Avandia.

“We made Avandia clinical trial results available on our website and shared these with regulators.

“With respect to Avandia, the settlement reached in 2012 following a US Department of Justice investigation related solely to the inadvertent omissions in certain Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulatory reports of information regarding the initiation and status of certain studies.

“The Department of Justice has expressly acknowledged that the information had been provided by GSK to the FDA in other forms. The FDA has also stated that the omissions did not impact the agency’s evaluation of the safety data related to Avandia.

“We continue to stand behind the safety and efficacy profile of Avandia in the treatment of type 2 diabetes when used appropriately.

“Nevertheless, we fully accept regulators’ decisions to restrict its use and have worked to make sure health professionals and patients understand this latest advice and guidance.”

The Offense

GSK’s response came after The Guardian reported that the company faces a number of lawsuits in the U.K. over Avandia.

“We expect the number of claims to increase as there are potentially thousands of people out there who took Avandia in the U.K.,” a lawyer told the newspaer. “Hopefully these claims will lead to more careful studies and checks on drugs that are widely marketed.”

GSK has said it paid more than $3 billion to settle U.S. federal and state government claims that it illegally marketed Avandia, once the world’s best-selling diabetes pill, and other medications. According to estimates by Bloomberg news service, individual Avandia settlements in the U.S. will be around $57,000.

“It is very disappointing,” the attorney said of GSK’s decision to fight. “We anticipate that these claims do have a good prospect of success, but they still have to prove their case in the UK with suitable evidence. They are tasked with having to produce that evidence, including medical expert opinion. It is a burden one would have thought they might not have to go through.”

If GSK leaders believed the Avandia settlements in the U.S. would make the nightmare go away, they obviously were mistaken.

GSK going public with a response to The Guardian shows the firm remains very sensitive to criticism about the drug and its handling. If court fights begin in public across the U.K., watch out …

[GSK ARCHIVE: Check out a decade of GSK stories as reported in WRAL Tech Wire.]

http://wraltechwire.com/gsk-lashes-back-at-british-newspaper-in-avandia-debate/12061525/

GlaxoSmithKline – You’re An Embarrassment (From Seroxat Sufferers)


Fid’s Seroxat Blog :

http://fiddaman.blogspot.ie/2012/11/glaxosmithkline-youre-embarrassment.html?utm_source=twitterfeed&utm_medium=twitter&utm_term=Seroxat,+Fiddaman

In the words of Suggs, lead vocalist with Brit Ska/Pop band, Madness, “You’re An Embarrassment.”

Our uncle he don’t wanna know he says
“We are a disgrace to the human race”, he says
“How can you show your face

When you’re a disgrace to the human race?”

No commitment, you’re an embarrassment
Yes, an embarrassment, a living endorsement

The intention that you have booked

Was an intention that was overlooked

GlaxoSmithKline and Thalidomide…


When I first created this blog over 5 years ago, I sub headed it with “Seroxat – The Mental Health Thalidomide. The reason I made a reference to Thalidomide in regards to Seroxat is because I believe that Seroxat is also a defective and dangerous drug, that not only harms those unfortunate enough to be prescribed it but I also suspected that it could damage the unborn. This suspicion has long been verified as an accurate prediction. Seroxat does harm the unborn. But, what I was primarily trying to illustrate by correlating the Seroxat scandal with the Thalidomide scandal was the sheer number of people who have been damaged by this medication. Yes, Thalidomide caused physical defects which are obvious and noticeable, but the damage from Seroxat, as well as being physical, also was highly psychological. The mental scars from Seroxat cannot be seen, but they can be accounted for.

Anyhow, little did I know, GSK were also involved in the Thalidomide scandal…
This from 2011..

http://www.businessweek.com/news/2011-10-27/drugmaker-grunenthal-is-sued-over-thalidomide-birth-defects.html

The thalidomide tragedy is now and always will be a part of Grunenthal’s company history,” according to its website. “Grunenthal and its family shareholders greatly regret the consequences of the thalidomide tragedy.”

Money for Damages

The company said in 2008 that it would pay 50 million euros ($70.9 million) to people injured by the drug.

Smith, Kline & French, now part of Brentford, U.K.-based GlaxoSmithKline, allegedly knew of the defects as early as 1958.

“The allegations in the complaint involve events dating back over 50 years and relate to actions by a predecessor company,” Mary Anne Rhyne, a Research Triangle Park, North Carolina-based spokeswoman for GlaxoSmithKline, said today in an e-mailed statement.

The suit’s allegations are without merit, she said.

“SmithKineFrench never manufactured or sold Thalidomide in the U.S. or elsewhere in the world,” she said. After conducting animal studies and a limited clinical trial, SKF determined the drug was ineffective as a sedative and never sought regulatory approval, Rhyne said.

The case is Yeatts v. SmithKline Beecham Corp., 003316, Pennsylvania Court of Common Pleas, Philadelphia County (Philadelphia).

–Editors: Peter Blumberg, Charles Carter

To contact the reporter on this story: Andrew Harris in Chicago at aharris16@bloomberg.net.

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Michael Hytha at mhytha@bloomberg.net

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