Tagged: Lawyer

Yes Bob… This Shit Really Does Just Write Itself..


Unsurprising to see the revolving door swing so wide, and how blatantly, however it’s a disturbing development nonetheless..


 

http://fiddaman.blogspot.ie/2017/06/trump-nominates-king-spalding-attorney.html

 

Wednesday, June 07, 2017

Trump Nominates King & Spalding Attorney

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Who is Christopher A. Wray?

Well, he’s a litigation partner in King & Spalding’s Washington DC and Atlanta office.

And who, I hear you ask, are King & Spalding?

Well, they’re the law firm who just got spanked in Chicago. They defended GlaxoSmithKline, arguing that their antidepressant, Paxil, did not cause the suicide of Stewart Dolin.

The jury saw through the weak defence and found Glaxo liable.

Prior to joining the firm, Wray served from 2003 to 2005 as the Assistant Attorney General in charge of the U.S. Department of Justice’s (DOJ) Criminal Division, the same department who, in 2012, slammed down a $3 billion fine after GlaxoSmithKline pleaded guilty to a whole host of federal crimes.

So, what duties does one who becomes director at the FBI have to carry out?

Well, he’s basically responsible for its day-to-day operations.

The FBI has jurisdiction over violations of more than 200 categories of federal crimes.

So nice to know that one of King & Spalding’s biggest and wealthiest clients, GlaxoSmithKline, may now have someone to oversee any future criminal behaviour of theirs.

This shit just writes itself.

Nice move, Don.

Bob Fiddaman

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Interesting Take On Andrew Witty’s Tenure By Erika Kelton For Forbes..


It’s good to see at least one mainstream news outlet has the balls to publish the truth about CEO Andrew Witty’s tenure at the helm at GSK over the past decade- however I would like to see more discussion about the 3 Billion dollar fine for what it actually was: a whitewash and NOT justice for consumers or patients- or in the words of Whistle-Blower Greg Thorpe– a mere “gift to GSK“…

Also, Perhaps Erika Kelton (the author of this Forbes article) could further explain to the public, why so little of this Department of Justice complaint involved Paxil (Seroxat/Paroxetine)? Considering that Paxil (Seroxat) has been GSK’s most controversial drug, I would like to know why was the focus of the investigation on Advair (GSK’s least dangerous drug when compared to drugs like Paxil) and also why do the other whistle-blowers- recruited at the time- not speak out about the sham investigation and white-wash fine?

My e-mail is always open to information and discussion Erika (if you’re reading!). I have much more information about GSK than I have published on this blog- several whistle-blowers have contacted me over the years, and some of these stories haven’t even been covered in the news at all, or online even.

Anyhow, here’s her Forbes article…

(ps- most of the info in this article could be gleaned straight from my blog- as I have been documenting GSK for ten years now- and have often done deeper digging than most journalists)


http://www.forbes.com/sites/erikakelton/2016/03/24/with-andrew-wittys-departure-will-glaxosmithkline-say-goodbye-to-fraud/

 

Mar 24, 2016 @ 04:43 PM 3,930 views

With Andrew Witty’s Departure, Will GlaxoSmithKline Say Goodbye to Fraud?

Erika Kelton ,

Contributor

I write about whistleblower matters involving fraud and other issues.

GSK has made headlines during Witty’s tenure, but for all the wrong reasons.

The company should scratch internal prospects off the list.

Glaxo SmithKline recently announced that its CEO, Andrew Witty, will be out the door as of March 31, 2017 – a development many were expecting.

GSK has made headlines during Witty’s tenure, but for all the wrong reasons.

Glaxo needs to make major changes after CEO Andrew Witty (on right) leaves the company next year.

Corruption, bribery, illegal marketing, contaminated drugs and collusion are some of the “highlights” of Glaxo’s business practices that were revealed during Witty’s nine years at the helm.

Witty oversaw Glaxo’s “Hall of Shame” when the following entries were added:

A $3 billion payment to the US to settle whistleblower allegations leading to civil and criminal charges that the company had marketed a number of its top-selling drugs for unapproved uses that in many cases endangered patients’ lives and health. It is the largest healthcare fraud settlement ever paid. (My firm represented the leading whistleblowers.)

A $750 million payment to settle whistleblower allegations that led to civil and criminal liability for manufacturing contaminated drugs at its facility in Puerto Rico and selling them.

A $489 million fine by a Chinese court for bribery and corruption charges based on allegations its China division paid doctors to prescribe Glaxo’s drugs. (A record penalty for China.)

Accusations of bribing doctors to prescribe Glaxo’s drugs in at least 11 other countries: Bahrain, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Oman, Poland, Qatar, Romania, Syria and United

Arab Emirates.

A fine of roughly $54.5 million by Britain’s Competition & Markets Authority for allegedly paying generic drug makers illegally to delay the launch of cheaper versions of Glaxo’s Seroxat, an antidepressant.

A fine of about $9 million imposed by India’s Competition Commission for allegedly colluding with Sanofi India in bidding to supply a meningitis vaccine to the government for Haj pilgrims.

That’s a record that won’t be missed.

On the bright side, Witty’s announced resignation provides an opportunity for Glaxo to clean up its act.

Glaxo reportedly is considering external as well as internal candidates for the top spot. The company should scratch internal prospects off the list.

Witty came up through the ranks and landed in the CEO office after more than 20 years of slogging his way up from management trainee. Although Witty surely knows the business well, he was also part of a culture that was not healthy. Only an outsider with great resolve has a chance of reshaping the business to respect compliant and ethical practices.

Given Glaxo’s recent history, the board of directors should ensure that Witty’s replacement does more than drive up profits. A dramatic cultural shift at GSK is long past due.

A good place to start would be to listen to employees when they blow the whistle internally, particularly given the billions the company has paid to resolve significant problems whistleblowers have exposed. Glaxo will find that being open to whistleblower concerns could be very profitable in more ways than one.

Erika Kelton is a whistleblower attorney and partner at Phillips & Cohen LLP. http://www.phillipsandcohen.com. Follow @Fraudmatters.

GlaxoSmithKline In The Dock Again!…


Old Corporate Bad Habits Die Hard …

http://www.pharmalot.com/2010/12/former-glaxo-lawyer-goes-to-trial-in-february/

Former Glaxo Lawyer Goes To Trial In February
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By Ed Silverman // December 2nd, 2010 // 8:23 am

Lauren Stevens, the former GlaxoSmithKline attorney, appeared in federal court yesterday and pleaded not guilty to a bunch of charges that generated enormous publicity last month. That’s because her indictment marked a rare moment when the federal government decided to hold a relatively high-ranking pharma employee accountable for an alleged off-label marketing infraction. She now faces an estimated three-week trial beginning on Feb. 1 (see this).
Specifically, Stevens was charged with one count of obstructing an official proceeding, one count of concealing and falsifying documents to influence a federal agency, and five counts of making false statements to the FDA (read the indictment). The indictment states that in October 2002, the FDA asked for info about promotion of Wellbutrin XR, as part of an inquiry into off-label marketing (back story here).
The trial, which will be held in US District Court in Maryland, should be fascinating. You may recall that her attorney, Brien O’Connor of Ropes & Gray, declared last month that “everything she did in this case was consistent with ethical lawyering and the advice provided her by a nationally prominent law firm retained by her employer specifically because of its experience in working with FDA.”
What might this mean? The trial may offer up the spectacle of a former Glaxo attorney – who is now officially retired, by the way – pointing fingers at one or more attorneys who billed Glaxo and, most likely, other large drugmakers on a regular basis. And perhaps Stevens and O’Connor will also look to pin some blame on other Glaxo personnel in the general counsel’s office and elsewhere. But imagine a courtroom filled with pharma lawyers also shouting ‘J’accuse!’ at one another for three weeks? This has the makings of high drama, yes?