Tagged: JP Garnier

Incredible Footage Of Former GSK CEO – JP Garnier- Surfaces- On Fiddaman’s New Post -From The Stewart Dolin ‘Paxil Induced Suicide” Trial In The US…


Bob Fiddaman has been doing stellar reporting/blogging about the Stewart Dolin, “Paxil Induced Suicide” Trial in Chicago. He has just posted incredible footage of JP Garnier (the former GSK CEO – before Andrew Witty) discussing Paxil/Seroxat in a video deposition (May 2006). Garnier is his usual arrogant, creepy self, however, the deposition itself is incredible. It seems that GSK had a legal duty to warn about serious adverse affects, so why were they passing the buck to the FDA?

Paxil/Seroxat caused much harm, death and destruction to tens of thousands of people, however judging by Garnier’s attitude in this video deposition, he comes across like he couldn’t care less…

In fact, he looks bored..

I guess dead Paxil/Seroxat people are just boring issues to some pharma CEO’s..

What is the point in having a CEO, if they are never held accountable?

Disturbing…


Saturday, March 18, 2017

Dolin Vs GSK – JP Garnier Video Deposition

http://www.facebook.com/plugins/like.php?href=http://fiddaman.blogspot.ie/2017/03/dolin-vs-gsk-jp-garnier-video-deposition.html&layout=button_count&show_faces=false&width=100&%20action=like&font=arial&colorscheme=light

I was going to take a break this weekend as I’m in Washington DC taking time out from a hectic week of traveling to and from the Chicago courthouse where GSK are claiming Paxil does not cause suicide in adults. Furthermore, GSK claims Paxil did not cause 57-year-old Stewart Dolin to end his life by jumping in front of a train. GSK’s argument is that Stewart Dolin had ‘work-related’ problems which caused him to jump. GSK claims the Paxil he was taking as prescribed had nothing to do with his akathisia-induced death.

Earlier this week three video depositions were aired to the jury, they featured former GSK CEO, JP Garnier, Former Glaxo Executive Jeffrey Dunbar and GSK biostatistician John Davies.

Much to my delight, the video depositions have now been released to the public – this is a unique move and one that makes me very happy indeed.

Today I’m going to focus on one of these three videos. It features former GSK CEO, JP Garnier. After watching the video you will hear audio that wasn’t aired in court. It, once again, features former Glaxo CEO, JP Garnier. It is audio that has been public for many years and, in the context of his video deposition, shows how Garnier had an opportunity to inform the public about Paxil’s suicide link but chose not to. He instead opted to hang-up the telephone live on air.

It’s important that you watch the video first then listen to the audio.

In the video, we hear JP Garnier answer questions about GSK’s responsibility to warn doctors and patients that Paxil can and does induce suicidality. In Dolin Vs GSK, King & Spalding (GSK’s defence team) have already told the jury during opening arguments that Paxil does not cause suicide in adults. Furthermore, they have claimed they told the FDA that, after reviewing Paxil data, they wished to change the drug labeling.  According to GSK, the FDA chose to use its own wording rather than using GSK’s. King & Spalding told the jury there was nothing else they could do regarding labeling. Garnier’s testimony, however, suggests that was a bold-faced lie.

The video deposition was taken in 2006.

“You can change your label without even getting approval from the FDA, there’s a law that allows you to do that, correct?”

Garnier answered, “Yes, but in practice, you don’t want to do that.”

He was then pressed, “Okay. But you can do it if you want, the law allows that to occur?”

Garnier replied, “Yes, but you do want the FDA to agree with the changes you are going to propose because they have the power to correct what you just said the day before. You know, let’s say we decide to inform physicians of some new event affecting our drug, well, the next day the FDA might come back and say, well, we didn’t like the way you did this, you have to redo it. So it’s considerably disrupting, that’s why most companies go through the FDA first, in practice, but you are right, there is a legal right for us to go directly to the public.”

So, Glaxo’s own CEO claimed in 2006 that there was a legal right to inform the public about any serious adverse event–including the most serious of them all, suicide.

Now, let’s listen to an interview from Garnier taken in May 2008, some two years after he admitted (under oath) that he and his company had a legal obligation to inform the public about serious adverse events and that they did not have to go through the FDA to get this news out.

Garnier was being interviewed by BBC correspondent, James Naughtie, about a vaccine. However, Naughtie deviated from the subject of vaccines and chose to ask Garnier about Seroxat (known as Paxil in the US).  Garnier, when pressed, chose not to discuss. Now, didn’t he have a legal right to do so, as he claimed in his 2006 video deposition? Instead, Garnier chose to hang up the phone and end the interview.

(Hmm, so much for having a legal duty to inform the public.)

I’ll leave it up to you, the reader/listener, to decide whether or not you think Glaxo’s former CEO had ample opportunity to inform the public about Paxil’s serious adverse events.

Here’s that classic audio… the discussion of Paxil starts at the 3.24 mark.

Garnier was given a public platform to inform consumers about Paxil’s serious adverse events, remember, as a CEO, he had a legal right. Why then did he choose to end the conversation abruptly?

Just sayin’.

Over to you, Todd.

**COMING UP TOMORROW**

The video testimonies of former Glaxo Executive Jeffrey Dunbar and GSK Biostatistician John Davies.

Bob Fiddaman.
 
Related
 

 

Advertisements

GSK CEO, Andrew Witty Says: “Occassionally We Make Mistakes”…


Pharm

“…Then you’ve got actually, we do occasionally make mistakes. Things go wrong. We have inevitably of course, we go through all the processes with the regulators to get a drug to be as safe and effective as it can possibly be. But the reality is, every time a human takes a drug, it’s like a clinical trial. You don’t really know what’s going to happen. Everybody can react a different way…”

I’m sure most people would be familiar with the film ‘The Devils Advocate’ with Al Pacino and Keanu Reeves. In the movie, Reeves is groomed into his dark corporate role by the Machiavellian Pacino- his boss and mentor. Unfortunately for Reeves his deal with the devil turns out to be just that.

‘The Devils Advocate’ is of course, a work of fiction, however, if you read though the stories and scandals of GSK over the past decade you could be forgiven for thinking you were reading a work of fiction; such is the scale and depth of GSK’s nefarious and suspect activities.

From tax evasion, dodgy factories spewing out defective and contaminated products, to bribery, fraud, prostitutes in China (and that’s not just the doctors on the payroll), corruption, suppression of side effects of their meds – resulting in killing of consumers, Serious Fraud Office investigations, Department of Justice investigations, pay for delay deals, etc etc.

The list goes on… and on… and on….

GSK are as insidiously and (dare I say it)- as evil – as you would imagine any multi-billion dollar international corporation to be…

But scarily- for you (and for me, and for the public)- GSK are real, they are not fiction and they make your toothpaste such as sensodyne, and your kids drinks like Ribena and Lucozade, as well some some really dodgy drugs like Seroxat, Avandia, Imitrex and Pandemrix…

And lets not forget the barbaric Myodil.

https://truthman30.wordpress.com/tag/splinters/

GSK is recalling dozens of lots–3,977,252 tubes–made up of different varieties of Biotene and Sensodyne toothpaste, from the U.S., Puerto Rico and Taiwan. According to the FDA‘s most recent Enforcement Report, “fragments of wood were found when the product was extruded onto a toothbrush.” The toothpaste was actually manufactured for GSK by Oratech, a Utah-based contractor.


http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/lucozade-and-irn-bru-to-carry-hyperactivity-warnings-2034324.html

“….The makers of two of Britain’s best-selling soft drinks, Lucozade and Irn-Bru, have been forced to warn parents that the drinks may cause hyperactivity. A newly introduced EU law compels both drinks to display a warning that they contain artificial colours linked to behavioural problems in young children..”


https://www.theguardian.com/science/2015/sep/16/seroxat-study-harmful-effects-young-people

“…An influential study which claimed that an antidepressant drug was safe for children and adolescents failed to report the true numbers of young people who thought of killing themselves while on it, re-analysis of the trial has found

Study 329, into the effects of GlaxoSmithKline’s drug paroxetine on under-18s, was published in 2001 and later found to be flawed. In 2003, the UK drug regulator instructed doctors not to prescribe paroxetine – sold as Seroxat in the UK and Paxil in the US – to adolescents…”


http://www.forbes.com/sites/matthewherper/2013/05/23/steven-nissen-the-hidden-agenda-behind-the-fdas-avandia-hearings/#67f26f5717a3

“..The most likely explanation: the leadership of the division of the FDA responsible for drug regulation, the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER), is seeking to avoid accountability for its role in the Avandia tragedy. In 2005 and 2006, GSK secretly conducted an analysis of the cardiovascular safety of Avandia and concluded that the drug increased the risk of heart attacks and related events by about 30%. This observation had grave implications: two thirds of diabetics, the intended recipients of the drug, eventually die of cardiovascular complications. Initially, GSK withheld the internal analysis from the FDA, but in 2006, the company informed CDER of the findings. FDA statisticians confirmed the risks, but, incredibly, CDER and GSK agreed privately to conceal this hazard from patients and practitioners…”

So be very careful when you ingest a GSK product because GSK are notoriously known for not telling you the truth about the products they sell you…

And even if the GSK label says the side effects are blah, blah, blah… don’t rely on them to be honest in the PIL either..  they often omit a lot of the truth..  they are notorious for lying and deceiving, often adding side effects (for years later) to their products’ information leaflets- long after millions of people have ingested them…

It’s easy to say, GSK are greedy, sociopathic, evil and callous, and they are (because most multi-billion dollar corporations are- they have to be because capitalism encourages them to be). However, it’s also easy to forget that GSK are a corporation run by people making the decisions for the company.

So could we then apply the same characteristics of greedy, sociopathic, evil and callous to the people running GSK?

Perhaps, in some cases, justifiably we can..

Take for example  (outgoing) GSK CEO Andrew Witty…

Before he was crowned CEO of GSK, Witty had worked in a number of roles in the company- many of them high level.

Witty once promoted the highly controversial Zyban (an anti-smoking drug)-  (also known as  Wellbutrin and promoted as an anti-depressant):

LONDON, UK — January 16, 2007

“Wellbutrin XR is an important new medicine for doctors and patients in Europe,” comments Andrew Witty, president, GSK Pharmaceuticals, Europe.

“Depression can be a crippling condition that is often difficult to treat.

With its unique mode of action, Wellbutrin XR offers a real alternative to the depressed patient.

We hope its profile will help patients stay on their therapy, which would address a significant unmet need in the area of antidepressants.”

http://www.theguardian.com/business/nils-pratley-on-finance/2016/mar/17/glaxosmithkline-gsk-andrew-witty-neil-woodford-break-up

“…It is even hard to say who is the leading candidate within the core pharmaceutical business. Is it Abbas Hussain, head of the division, or Patrick Vallance, head of research and development? And perhaps Emma Walmsley, boss of consumer healthcare, a bigger unit after being beefed via a shuffle of assets with Novartis, is a decent outside bet….”

So how much did JP Garnier and Andrew Witty know about GSK’s bad behavior over the years they spent crawling up the greasy ladder within the company?

I’d say they knew a lot..

There is a rumor that that the next head of GSK might be Emma Walmsley..

I wonder what price you have to put on your soul to become CEO of a company like GSK?

“John Milton:..You sharpen the human appetite to the point where it can split atoms with its desire; you build egos the size of cathedrals; fiber-optically connect the world to every eager impulse; grease even the dullest dreams with these dollar-green, gold-plated fantasies, until every human becomes an aspiring emperor, becomes his own God… and where can you go from there? As we’re scrambling from one deal to the next, who’s got his eye on the planet? As the air thickens, the water sours, even bees’ honey takes on the metallic taste of radioactivity… and it just keeps coming, faster and faster. There’s no chance to think, to prepare; it’s buy futures, sell futures… when there is no future. We got a runaway train, boy. We got a billion Eddie Barzoons all jogging into the future. Every one of them is getting ready to fistfuck God’s ex-planet, lick their fingers clean, as they reach out toward their pristine, cybernetic keyboards to tote up their fucking billable hours. And then it hits home. You got to pay your own way”..

 

(Al Pacino/John Milton- “The Devils Advocate”)

Emma-Walmsley

CH7YOanVAAANoD3

http://fortune.com/most-powerful-women-europe-middle-east-africa/emma-walmsley-24/

The London-based pharma exec runs the world’s leading over-the-counter pharma company—a $9.5 billion joint venture between GSK and its Swiss competitor Novartis, officially launched in March. Walmsley led the integration of the businesses, which resulted from a complex deal struck in April 2014. The company’s products are sold in 160 countries, with 42% of sales coming from emerging markets. In July, Walmsley, a lover of Italian red wine and Bikram yoga, was appointed to the board of Diageo. —Erika Fry

(Q): Where Do The GSK Pharmafioso Gangsters Go? … (A): To Greener Pastures Of Course!


http://www.businessweek.com/news/2012-07-03/glaxo-executives-cited-in-case-now-lead-sanofi-actelion

Glaxo Executives Cited in Case Now Lead Sanofi, Actelion

July 03, 2012

Sanofi CEO Chris Viehbacher

Chris Viehbacher, chief executive officer of Sanofi. Photographer: Fabrice Dimier/Bloomberg

Two senior executives at GlaxoSmithKline Plc (GSK) singled out by the U.S. Justice Department for pushing the Advair asthma drug for unapproved uses have moved on to some of Europe’s top pharmaceutical companies.

Jean-Pierre Garnier, chief executive officer from 2000 to 2008, is chairman of Swiss drugmaker Actelion Ltd. (ATLN), while Chris Viehbacher, Glaxo’s former president of U.S. pharmaceuticals, is CEO of Sanofi, Europe’s third-biggest drug company. The department cited the men, along with Stanley Hull, a former senior vice president for U.S. pharmaceuticals, in a lawsuit July 2.

“High-level GSK executives implemented the off-label promotion of Advair,” the Justice Department said in the complaint filed in Boston federal court.

Prosecutors didn’t file charges or sue the former executives. London-based Glaxo agreed to pay $3 billion to settle allegations that it illegally promoted prescription drugs and failed to report safety data, the government said July 2. The settlement is the largest ever in a health-care fraud case.

Jean-Marc Podvin, a spokesman for Paris-based Sanofi, said Viehbacher wasn’t immediately available for comment. Roland Haefeli, a spokesman for Allschwil, Switzerland-based Actelion, said Garnier didn’t have an immediate comment. Phone and e-mail messages left for Hull with a New Jersey company where he serves on the board weren’t immediately returned.

“I want to express our regret and reiterate that we have learnt from the mistakes that were made,” Glaxo CEO Andrew Witty said in a statement July 2. While the matters in the settlement “originate in a different era for the company, they cannot and will not be ignored,” he said.

Black-Box Warning

Glaxo promoted Advair from 2001 through at least 2010 for all asthma patients, even though the Food and Drug Administration approved the drug for use in only severe cases, according to the complaint.

The agency added a so-called black-box warning to Advair’s label in 2003 that data showed “a small but significant increase in asthma-related deaths” in patients receiving long- acting beta agonists, a type of drug found in Advair.

“The direction to target mild and newly diagnosed patients for first-line Advair use came from the highest level of the company and was reiterated by the company’s senior management,” according to the Justice Department complaint, which cited statements by Hull in 2002 and 2004, by Viehbacher in 2004, and by Garnier in 2006.

‘Phenomenal’ Drug

“The real opportunity for us with Advair is that we can now convince physicians that there is no such thing as mild or severe asthma: you have asthma,” Viehbacher said at a presentation to investors in London in 2004, according to the filing. He quit Glaxo in September 2008 to join Sanofi (SAN) after losing out to Witty in the race to replace Garnier as CEO.

In January 2006, Garnier told investors that the FDA’s warning on Advair’s safety shouldn’t affect Glaxo’s stock price because it is “not meaningful and it is not going to have a big effect. I think products such as Advair are phenomenal for the treatment of asthma, and they should be used for mild to moderate and severe asthmatics. Physicians are not going to listen to the FDA.”

Garnier retired as Glaxo CEO in May 2008 and was named chairman of Actelion last year. Hull’s profile on LinkedIn.com lists him as an independent pharmaceuticals professional in North Carolina. He serves on the board of Palatin Technologies Inc. (PTN:US), a drug company in Cranbury, New Jersey, according to the company’s website.

Pleading Guilty

Glaxo didn’t admit liability or wrongdoing in the selling and marketing of Advair and seven other products included in the investigation.

Glaxo will plead guilty to three misdemeanor charges — marketing the anti-depressants Paxil and Wellbutrin for uses not approved by the FDA, and for failing to report clinical data on the Avandia diabetes treatment. The company marketed Paxil to doctors as a treatment for people under the age of 18 while knowing that the drug hadn’t proved effective for these patients, according to government documents.

Glaxo withheld clinical data from studies of Paxil completed in 1998 and 2001 and falsified results from a third study for publication, according to a document filed by prosecutors in Boston federal court. In 2004, the U.S. required makers of Paxil and other antidepressants to carry a black-box warning on their labels, advising that the medicines could increase the risk of suicidal thoughts and behavior in patients under the age of 18.

%d bloggers like this: