GSK’s Statement About Their Dodgy Cervarix Vaccine “Patient safety is always GSK’s first priority”…


Do you really believe that ‘patient safety’ is GSK’s first priority?

I would say that Profits are GSK’s first priority…

Take a look at Whistleblower Greg Thorpe’s Department of Justice Complaint from 5 years or so ago (link below) and then decide whether you think ‘patient safety’ is always GSK’s first priority…

https://truthman30.wordpress.com/2015/08/28/whistleblower-greg-thorpes-7th-ammended-complaint/

 


http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-4909164/Teen-died-HPV-jab-experts-brand-vaccine-useless.html

 

 

Teenager died in her sleep weeks after being given HPV vaccine as experts reveal the lives of thousands of girls have been destroyed by the controversial jab

  • Jasmin Soriat, 19, showed neurological symptoms after having a second HPV jab
  • The teen from Vienna suffered respiratory failure three weeks later
  • Pathologist said the vaccine could have been the cause of her death
  • British teenager Ruby Shallom is also included in the documentary, her family say she was left paralysed  after having the jab
  • The stories of both girls are included in a new documentary in which doctors claim the HPV virus does not even cause cancer 

A teenage girl died in her sleep weeks after being given the controversial human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, a new documentary has claimed.

Jasmin Soriat, 19, a student from Vienna, suffered neurological symptoms after having a second dose of the injection and suffered respiratory failure three weeks later.

A pathologist who examined her body has said the vaccine could have been the cause of her death.

Jasmin’s story is one of ‘hundreds of documented deaths following the HPV vaccine’ according to claims in a new three-part documentary, titled Sacrificial Virgins.

Thousands of girls around the world have suffered adverse reactions, often developing chronic fatigue syndrome.

The family of British teenager Ruby Shallom from Bracknell, Berkshire, also claim she was left paralysed in three limbs after having the HPV jab.

She also appears in the documentary and reveals: ‘The only limb that works now is my left arm… I still go out and see my friends but the pain and fatigue makes it hard.’

However health officials across the globe have always strongly denied there are such devastating effects and say there is not enough evidence.

The jab is given to adolescents because the HPV virus is said to cause certain cancers – and almost all cervical forms of the disease.

But other experts have branded the vaccination ‘useless’ and argue there is no proven link between the sexually-transmitted virus and cancer.

 Scroll down for video 

Jasmin Soriat, 19, from Vienna, died from respiratory failure three weeks after having a second dose of the HPV vaccine

Jasmin Soriat, 19, from Vienna, died from respiratory failure three weeks after having a second dose of the HPV vaccine

These girls are among 'hundreds of documented deaths following the HPV vaccine', according to Joan Shenton, the narrator of documentary Sacrificial Virgins 

These girls are among ‘hundreds of documented deaths following the HPV vaccine’, according to Joan Shenton, the narrator of documentary Sacrificial Virgins 

JASMIN’S FINAL HOURS BEFORE SHE WAS FOUND LIFELESS

Jasmin was a ‘fit, happy and fun-loving’ student, according to local newspaper reports.

But less that one month after her last Gardasil injection, her friend discovered her lifeless body.

She died in her sleep of respiratory failure, on December 10 2007 aged just 19.

She had never had any serious illnesses or lung disease, and had never smoked.

Jasmin did not experience any previous problems after any of her normal vaccinations, her family said.

Searching for answers, her parents reconstructed her final hours of life.

A picture of a regular teenager emerged. She attended a concert then went to a fast food restaurant at midnight. She then got a taxi with her flatmate to her home in Döbling. At 2am, she had a cup of tea.

The next morning, her girlfriend came by to check up on her, but Jasmin, according to the woman, ‘must have died a few hours earlier in her sleep’.

In the three-part film, doctors have spoken out to challenge the widely-accepted theory that the HPV virus causes almost all cervical cancers in later life.

Campaigners are comparing the HPV vaccine to the thalidomide scandal, which saw a morning sickness pill given to women in 1960s and 1970s that was later withdrawn after it was linked to birth defects in infants.

Award-winning producer Joan Shenton, who narrates the documentary which is supported by the pressure groups SaneVax and the UK Association of HPV Vaccine Injured Daughters (AHVID) said: ‘In the face of growing evidence of adverse reactions and public calls for a ban, thalidomide was on the market for five years before authorities around the world called a halt.

‘During those years, manufacturers continued to sell and doctors continued to prescribe. The HPV vaccine has been on the market for longer, since 2008, and is routinely administered, often paid for by taxpayers’ money and distributed through schools and health authorities.

‘It too has severe side effects but, unlike thalidomide, the HPV vaccination is not even proven to work. Our films are intended as an urgent wake-up call.’

Pathologist: Vaccine could have killed Jasmine

Government forensic pathologist Dr Johan Missliwetz was ordered by a court to do a second autopsy on Miss Soriat as the first could not establish the cause of death.

He concluded that the vaccine could have been the cause of her demise.

The doctor, who has now taken early retirement, said: ‘I couldn’t find a reasonable cause of death but had two suspicions. One is a genetic disorder of the heart and the other one, it had to do with vaccination.’

THE 16-YEAR-OLD GIRL LEFT PARALYSED BY THE HPV VACCINE

Ruby Shallom suffered spasms and pain

Ruby Shallom suffered spasms and pain

A 16-year-old British girl left paralysed in three limbs after having the HPV jab also appears in the documentary.

Back in 2014, Ruby Shallom from Bracknell, Berkshire, was vaccinated at school to protect her against cervical cancer as part of the routine NHS programme, MailOnline reported last December.

In the new film she said: ‘The only limb that works now is my left arm… I still go out and see my friends but the pain and fatigue makes it hard.’

Weeks after having the vaccine, the keen horse-rider and runner started to suffer from stomach spasms, dizziness, pain, headaches and fatigue.

Her muscles became weaker and in May 2016 – two years after she was given the jab – she woke up with no feelings in her legs whatsoever.

She is now virtually bed bound – unable to eat, lift or dress herself, incontinent and often too weak to lift her head.

Doctors have been unable to diagnose her with anything and have dismissed it as being psychological, refusing to acknowledge any link to the jab.

When he reported his findings to the drug regulation authorities, he said he received a number of phone calls from senior members of the medical establishment.

‘There was a lot of interventions. Many professors called me up and told me I should stop talking about vaccination tests.

‘I’ve done thousands of autopsies but nobody called me. This was extraordinary.’

WHAT IS HPV?

The human papilloma virus (HPV) is the name given to a family of viruses.

There are over 100 different types of HPV, with around 40 types that affect the genital area.

Different types of HPV are classed as either high risk or low risk, depending on the conditions they can cause.

For instance, some types of HPV can cause warts or verrucas. Other types are associated with cervical cancer.

In 99 per cent of cases, cervical cancer is said to occur as a result of a history of infection with high-risk types of HPV.

Infection with other types of HPV is linked to genital warts, skin warts and verrucas, vaginal cancer or vulval cancer, anal cancer or cancer of the penis, some cancers of the head and neck and laryngeal papillomas (warts on the voice box or vocal cords).

Why do the establishment vaccinate against HPV?

HPV infection – which is spread through close skin-to-skin contact, often during sexual activity – is extremely common. Up to eight out of 10 people will be infected with the virus at some point in their lives, according to Cancer Research UK.

It usually causes no symptoms at all and for most people, the body will clear the infection on its own. But for some it stays around for a long time and is believed to cause cancer, for reasons not fully understood.

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), virtually all cervical cancer cases (99 percent) are linked to genital infection with HPV.

It says both HPV vaccines – Cervarix and Gardasil – are ‘highly efficacious’ in preventing infection with virus types 16 and 18, which are together responsible for approximately 70 per cent of cervical cancer cases globally.

Fragments of HPV have been found in cancer cells in studies, hence the theory why the virus causes cancer.

But one of the film’s key arguments is that the presence of HPV in cancer cells does not mean HPV actually causes the cancer.

No proof HPV causes cancer 

Professor Peter Duesberg argues cervical cancers are not caused by HPV

Professor Peter Duesberg argues cervical cancers are not caused by HPV

In the film, Peter Duesberg, a professor of molecular biology the respected University of California, Berkeley said that scientific studies have found that cervical cancers are not caused by the HPV virus.

The academic, who wrote a controversial research paper arguing that HIV does not cause AIDS, said that they prove HPV cannot be found anywhere in the tumour or tumour cells.

‘The [HPV] vaccine should be stopped until it’s proved that it protects against cancer… It has the highest number of side-effects ever of any vaccine,’ he argued.

‘In the US, it has more side-effects reported than all other vaccines combined.

‘Since there is no scientific evidence that it will do anything else than occasionally cause warts, which will be eliminated by the immune system, there is no need for vaccination against this virus.’

He claims the vaccine won’t be properly investigated because GPs and pharmaceutical companies benefit financially. 

Dr Christian Fiala, who specialises in obstetrics and gynaecology in Vienna, also agrees there is no evidence that the HPV vaccine reduces the rate cervical cancer.

‘No-one has shown that the HPV vaccine actually reduces the rate of cervical cancer,’ he said.

‘As long as we have no proof that cervical cancer is caused by HPV, it is fundamentally useless to vaccinate against HPV because the chances are the cancer will occur whether there is HPV or not.’

Previous studies  

An article published in 2015 in the journal Clinical Rheumatology warned that chronic pain conditions are ‘more frequent after HPV vaccination’.

Researcher Dr Manuel Martinez-Lavin warned that fibromyalgia – which causes widespread pain – and a nervous system condition called postural tachycardia syndrome (PoTS), seem to be linked to the jabs.

Symptoms of PoTS include fainting, dizziness, inability to concentrate and fatigue. The condition can be long-term or even permanent

Ruby Shallom, 16, who was left paralysed in three limbs after having the HPV vaccination, features in the new documentary

Ruby Shallom, 16, who was left paralysed in three limbs after having the HPV vaccination, features in the new documentary

Another study, in the European Journal of Neurology examined the cases of six young women who had developed PoTS within weeks of receiving HPV jabs. It, too, suggested there may be a link.

In the US, France, Spain and Denmark, more than 250 court cases are being mounted over HPV vaccinations. Damages have been won in the US and France.

The Japanese government withdrew its recommendation for the HPV vaccine in 2013, after highly publicised cases of alleged adverse events in girls who had been vaccinated.

Officials stick to their stance 

Yet health authorities around the world, including the World Health Organization, have recently extensively reviewed the vaccine and have concluded it is safe.

The UK medicines watchdog, the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) and Public Health England said the HPV jab is the most effective way to protect against cervical cancer, which kills 900 UK women each year.

Officials estimate that around 400 lives are saved each year as a result of vaccinating girls before they become infected.

MHRA received 3,972 ‘Yellow Cards’ – a scheme where doctors and the public can report side-effects of drugs – between 2010 and 2013. More than 940 were categorised as serious.

The manufacturers of one of the HPV jabs, Cervarix, insists the benefits of vaccination outweigh any risks associated with its use (stock photo)

The manufacturers of one of the HPV jabs, Cervarix, insists the benefits of vaccination outweigh any risks associated with its use (stock photo)

Yet Dr Ian Hudson, MHRA chief executive, wrote to Richard Benyon, the Conservative MP for Newbury, saying: ‘The fact that we have received more reports for HPV vaccine than other vaccines does not in itself raise any particular concerns.’

A spokesperson for GSK, manufacturers of Cervarix, previously told Good Health: ‘Patient safety is always GSK’s first priority. A vaccine is only ever approved for the public if clinical trials show the benefits of vaccination outweigh any risks associated with its use.

‘Governments globally scrutinise clinical trial data through independent medicines review agencies before vaccines can be approved for use. We remain confident in the favourable benefit-risk profile of Cervarix to help prevent cervical cancer.’

Freda Birrell, who heads the pressure group AHVID said the campaign against the jab is growing.

She said: ‘I’d like to see our politicians listen, I’d like to see them recognise that what’s been happening can not be a coincidence.’ 

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The BBC’s Explosive Documentary On SSRI (Antidepressant) Induced Violence Airs Tonight…


 

So BBC panorama are airing a Panorama investigation tonight into anti-depressant induced violence, and of course, even before the documentary has aired, we have all the pro-SSRI mouthpieces (most notably from the Royal college of Psychiatry UK) coming out en masse to condemn it before it has even been broadcast.

This is no surprise considering the Royal college of psychiatry and most of its members (not just UK psychiatrists but global psychiatrists) have long been in the pocket of the pharmaceutical industry. Of course, most of the mainstream media outlets, fail to mention that very significant fact.

However, despite the melodrama, it was interesting to note the position of Mind (the UK’s biggest and most respected mental health charity) who said:

….”Stephen Buckley, head of information at Mind, said: “Millions of people take SSRIs and other antidepressants and many find them useful in managing their mental health problems. “Side effects from medication can be serious but it’s important to recognise that severe side effects such as those explored in this programme are incredibly rare. “Anyone prescribed medication for a mental health problem should be fully informed about the drug and its side effects so they can make an informed choice about whether it’s the right treatment for them.”…


Stephen Buckley, from Mind, is wise to err on the side of caution, and that is part of what his job entails, however isn’t it interesting that he does not disagree with the findings of the documentary? He says that “severe side effects such as those explored in this programme are incredibly rare“. I agree with him, somewhat, antidepressant induced violent acts are relatively rare, however, anti-depressant induced violent thoughts are perhaps more common than most people realize.

Many people have antidepressant induced violent thoughts and impulses, it’s just Russian Roulette that decides who will act on them, and who won’t..

Seroxat (GSK’s notorious SSRI) causes aggression, akathisia (a feeling of unbearable anxiety), and violent thoughts/dreams/impulses; the whole class of SSRI drugs can cause these reactions. Many tens of thousands of people have been saying this about them for decades. I have experienced these side effects myself, from Seroxat.

There is no disputing this.

Of course, the (owned by the Pharmaceutical industry) Royal College of Psychiatry, and the other organizations with vested interests, will dismiss my experiences, and those of others who were harmed by SSRI’s, as merely anecdotal, but in the same breath they will quote (anecdotally) that that ‘these medicines save lives’. They will then quote the vague and mysterious ‘evidence based medicine’ to back up their stance, but what they won’t tell you is that the ‘evidence base’ is entirely unreliable, and in most cases -utterly corrupted, and in the worse cases- outright lies. They won’t tell you that the pharmaceutical industry is among the most corrupt industries on the planet (see Whisleblower Greg Thorpe’s GSK felony complaint here), and that death from psychiatric drugs in particular is a staggeringly high outcome for many.

See SSRI Stories for many thousands of documented cases

Or QuitPaxil.org for more.

 


https://www.thesun.co.uk/tvandshowbiz/4061091/a-prescription-for-murder-on-bbc-one-shelley-jofre-time-documentary/
CAN A PILL MAKE YOU KILL?

When is A Prescription For Murder? on BBC One, who is Shelley Jofre and what’s the documentary about?

Find out about this new show that looks at whether a pill can cause you to kill

A PRESCRIPTION For Murder? is a BBC documentary focusing on the potential effects of prescription antidepressants.

But what is it about? And when can you watch it? Here’s what we know…

A Prescription For Murder is a new BBC documentary fronted by Shelley Jofre

NOT KNOWN REFER TO COPYRIGHT HOLDER
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A Prescription For Murder is a new BBC documentary fronted by Shelley Jofre

What is A Prescription For Murder?

This new Panorama documentary looks into whether prescription antidepressants can turn you into a killer.

Over 40 million prescriptions for SSRI antidepressants were handed out by doctors last year in the UK.

Panorama reveals the devastating side effects on a tiny minority that can lead to psychosis, violence, possibly even murder.

With exclusive access to psychiatric reports, court footage and drug company data, reporter Shelley Jofre investigates the mass killings at the 2012 midnight premiere of a Batman movie in Aurora, Colorado. Twenty-four-year-old PhD student James Holmes, who had no record of violence or gun ownership, murdered 12 and injured 70.

Did the SSRI antidepressant he had been prescribed play a part in the killings?

Panorama has uncovered other cases of murder and extreme violence which could be linked to psychosis developed after the taking of SSRIs – including a father who strangled his 11-year-old son.

Panorama asks if enough is known about this rare side effect, and if doctors are unwittingly prescribing what could be a prescription for murder.

When is A Prescription for Murder? on?

You can catch the show at 9pm on Wednesday July 26, 2017.

If you miss it, you can catch it again on the BBC iPlayer.

Who is Shelley Jofre?

Shelley is a journalist who was born in Irvine, Ayrshire.

She began her career back in 1995 and is now one of the top investigators for Panorama.

Shelley is married and has a daughter.

James Holmes was responsible for the Batman shootings

GETTY IMAGES
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James Holmes was responsible for the Batman shootings

Who is James Homes and what was the Aurora massacre?

James Eagan Holmes was born December 13, 1987 and is an American convicted mass murder.

He was responsible for the Aurora cinema shooting that killed 12 people and injured 70 others at a Century movie theatre in Aurora, Colorado, on July 20, 2012.

He walked into a midnight screening of Batman movie The Dark Knight Rises and threw two gas canisters into the audience.

Many in the audience thought it was a publicity stunt until he began spraying the crown with the shotgun, then the assault rifle and finally the pistol.

A witness said he went outside and and shot people as they ran.

Cops apprehended Holmes in his car behind the cinema within minutes of the shooting. He told them that he was “The Joker”.

On August 7 2015 Holmes was sentenced to life in prison without parole, avoiding the death penalty because the jury could not come to a unanimous decision.


http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/resources/idt-sh/aurora_shooting

 

The Batman Killer –
a prescription for murder?

James Holmes, a young man with no record of violence, murdered 12 people watching Batman in a Colorado cinema in 2012.

Did an SSRI antidepressant, prescribed by a doctor, play a part in the killings?

He slumps wild-eyed across the desk from detectives, with a mess of badly dyed red hair, his clothes hanging off him.

James Holmes looks every inch the monster who coldly executed 12 innocent people and injured dozens more at a midnight screening of the Batman film, The Dark Knight Rises.

Holmes had carried out the killings with an arsenal of weaponry he had accumulated in the preceding weeks. He had planned the shootings down to the tiniest detail, even booby-trapping his own apartment with home-made bombs to divert police resources while he launched the attack.

Watching a recording of his interview at the police station, conducted just hours after he carried out one of the worst mass shootings in recent US history, who could feel anything but loathing for this callous 24-year-old graduate student? When asked how to spell his surname, Holmes cockily replies, “Like Sherlock”.

When left alone with paper bags on his hands to secure forensic evidence, he’s caught on camera using them to talk to one another, like sock puppets.

The only hint he may have some inkling of what he’s just done is when he asks a detective, “There wasn’t any children hurt?” In fact, six-year-old Veronica Moser-Sullivan was the youngest of Holmes’s victims that night in July 2012 – killed as she watched the movie premiere with her mother at the packed cinema in Aurora, Colorado.

Americans have become wearily accustomed to mass shootings. Usually, in the days and weeks that follow, some kind of warped explanation emerges – be it terrorism, revenge or a predisposition to violence. It’s highly unusual for the perpetrator to be taken alive. Usually they are killed or kill themselves at the scene.

Holmes survived, and as the evidence stacked up it looked like another tragic collision of mental breakdown with America’s lax gun laws.

Holmes's Glock 22 Pistol photographed on the bonnet of his car

Holmes’s Glock 22 Pistol photographed on the bonnet of his car

Why else would a clever, shy guy with no history of violence, from a loving home, carry out such a heinous attack? Holmes had no enemies, no terrorist ideology to drive him on.

But the student had been seeing a psychiatrist at the University of Colorado Denver and this was no barrier to him buying a handgun, tear gas, full body armour and a semi-automatic rifle.

 .223 M&P Assault Rifle photographed outside the cinema

 .223 M&P Assault Rifle photographed outside the cinema

Before he faced a court of law, Holmes was evaluated by a number of psychiatrists. No two doctors reached exactly the same conclusion. There were diagnoses of schizophrenia, schizoid personality disorder, schizotypal disorder – or no diagnosable disorder at all. Some thought Holmes couldn’t legally be held responsible for his crime, on grounds of insanity. Others disagreed, arguing he still knew right from wrong when he carried out the shootings.

When these questions came before a jury two years ago, the verdict was unanimous. Holmes was found guilty on all counts of murder and multiple counts of attempted murder.

Judge Carlos Samour Jr said:

It is the court’s intention that the defendant never set foot in free society again. Get the defendant out of my courtroom please.”

He was led from the dock to jeers of “loser”, as his bewildered parents Bob and Arlene looked on, to begin one of the longest prison terms in US history – 12 life sentences plus 3,318 years in prison. He only narrowly escaped the death penalty.

Holmes is being held in solitary confinement at a maximum security prison in an undisclosed state, because the nature of his crimes make him a target for other prisoners. That’s how he will spend the rest of his days.

Like any other casual observer skimming over the court reporting online, I thought justice had been done, and that this was where Holmes’s story ended. Then I spoke to psycho-pharmacologist and long-time campaigner on the potential dangerous side effects of antidepressants, Prof David Healy.

Healy had been hired as an expert witness in the James Holmes case and had visited him in jail before the trial. The public defender appointed to represent Holmes wanted Healy to evaluate whether the antidepressant sertraline (also known as Lustral in the UK and Zoloft in the US), which Holmes had been prescribed, could have played a role in the mass murder.

Prof David Healy

Prof David Healy

I have worked with David Healy in the past on a number of investigative films for the BBC’s current affairs programme, Panorama.

These films revealed cases where people with no previous history of suicidal thoughts or violence went on to seriously harm themselves or others after being thrown into a state of mental turmoil by the newer generation of SSRI antidepressants, such as paroxetine and fluoxetine.

Before meeting Holmes, Healy doubted the pills had played a part. But by the end of his prison visit he had reached a controversial conclusion.

He was never called to give evidence at the trial of James Holmes, but he told me in August 2016 that he would have told the court:

These killings would never have happened had it not been for the medication James Holmes had been prescribed.”

David Healy

SSRIs are thought to work by boosting serotonin levels to the brain.

Stephen Buckley, from mental health charity Mind, says:

Millions of people take SSRIs and other antidepressants and many find them useful in managing their mental health problems. Side effects from medication can be serious but it’s important to recognise that severe side effects are incredibly rare.”

He adds that no-one should stop taking medication suddenly, without advice from a health professional.

“If anyone is concerned that they may be experiencing harmful side effects they should speak to their doctor or pharmacist about alternatives.”

Prof Wendy Burn, president of the Royal College of Psychiatrists, says: “In all treatments – from cancer to heart disease – medicines which do good can also do harm. This applies in psychiatry. Current evidence from large-scale studies continues to show that for antidepressants the benefits outweigh the risks.”

David Healy maintains that while antidepressants can be a lifesaver for some, for others they can cause more harm than the original problems they were prescribed to treat.

But what makes a young man plan over months a mass shooting, then carry it out with cold precision? Could antidepressants possibly do that?

‘He was too good’

Arlene and Bob Holmes sat through every day of their son’s trial but rejected all approaches to talk in public about their son out of respect for the victims and their families.

However, a book that Arlene wrote, When the Focus Shifts: The Prayer Book of Arlene Holmes 2013-2014, gives an insight into her thoughts in the run-up to the trial in April 2015.

Arlene and Bob Holmes arrive at the court building

Arlene and Bob Holmes arrive at the court building

In one section, she describes the effects of taking the lowest dose of an SSRI antidepressant in March 2014:

I have become fatter, ‘flatter’, dumber, number. Less tearful, yes. Unfortunately, less of everything. The sunset and the beach no longer lift my spirits.”

She continues: “I sit through church service and sift through the Bible, uninspired. I’m fuzzy. Weird dreams. Crying used to be a release. Now I cannot cry, or laugh. I hate this feeling.”

Arlene Holmes, a nurse, wrote that she stopped taking the pills before the trial, telling her doctor she wanted to be able to feel things and to cry if she wanted to.

If she had a bad experience with an SSRI antidepressant, what would she make of David Healy’s view of her son’s case?

I contacted the couple’s lawyer explaining my own background in investigating antidepressants and suggesting that Arlene and Bob Holmes might hold information that could, ultimately, help prevent future tragedies.

A few weeks later an email from Arlene dropped into my inbox. Short and to the point, it requested more information and asked me not to share her contact details with anyone.

“Some people bear my family ill will,” she wrote.

When we finally spoke on the phone, it became clear Arlene and Bob had never seriously considered the effect antidepressants might have had on their son’s behaviour. In fact, they hadn’t even known of David Healy’s involvement as a pre-trial expert witness.

Persuaded that exploring their son’s case in depth may ultimately help others, they reluctantly agreed to a filmed interview. It wouldn’t help their son – they know he will spend the rest of his life in prison.

Approaching their low-rise detached home in a neat suburb of San Diego, what struck me was the sheer ordinariness – a man out washing his car, another mowing his lawn, kids playing baseball in the park. Inside, the Holmes’ house is modest, understated – just like Arlene and Bob.

“We are an introverted family,” says Arlene. “We are not showy but we like having people around. We care about the larger picture in society and we are Christians, we go to church.”

If you had told me this would happen to us I just wouldn’t have believed it.”

Arlene Holmes

The couple have struggled to understand how their boy could cause so much hurt and pain to others.

“Not in your wildest dreams would you think your son would shoot strangers,” says Arlene. “For someone who loved kids and dogs and always did his homework and his chores. You can’t believe it is possible for anyone to cause that much harm, let alone the man you raised.”

She says they never saw any signs of violence, and that her son had not shown any interest in drink or drugs.

“In retrospect, I think he was too good. Maybe I should have worried about the fact he was so good, but as a mother you can worry about just about anything.”

Bob Holmes, a retired statistician, is a man of few words.

“He was never interested in guns or really even a violent kid, that’s why it was surprising. It came out of nowhere. He seemed happy enough, just pretty much a normal everyday kid growing up, so…” Bob’s voice trails off as though he can’t bear to finish the thought.

They say there had been ups and downs along the way but little to mark them out from any other family.

They moved home when James was 13 and he found the transition hard. He was quiet but he had friends and took part in sports. He cruised through his academic work at school and, later, as an undergraduate.

Bob and Arlene speak about taking James to a counsellor:

The first real hump in the road was when Holmes applied to six top universities to study for a doctorate in neuroscience. Academically bright, his shyness in interviews appeared to work against him. He was rejected by all of them.

“He came home and he just kind of didn’t do much of anything for a while, and he just kind of hung out,” says Bob.

Arlene says her son was sleeping a lot and not going out much.

“So I got mad and I said, ‘You are done with college, you need to do something.’”

Holmes took his mother’s advice and found a job working night shifts in a pill factory while he applied to more universities.

In 2011, he accepted an offer to study neuroscience at University of Colorado Denver and started in the autumn. Not his first choice, says his mother, but it all seemed to be working out fine.

“He still was happy to be at Colorado, talked to us about eventually settling and he eventually borrowed money to buy a town house on the outskirts of Denver,” she says.

So when you hear something like that, the last thing in the world that you would ever think is that something as bad as a shooting could possibly happen. He was planning a future there.”

Very few of Holmes’s former friends are willing to talk, but one – a young man who knew him well as an undergraduate – spoke to me on condition of anonymity. The Holmes he knew and liked was just as Bob and Arlene described – shy, polite, frugal and smart.

They used to play video games together – strategy games, not the violent kind, he says. There was the occasional beer, but no drugs, parties or girls.

“We were pretty nerdy,” he says.

Discovering someone he was close to could commit mass murder had been “a profound experience”. When he heard what his friend had done, he knew something must have happened to him.

“I still don’t know how to make sense of it,” he says.

Hillary Allen

Hillary Allen

Someone who spent time with Holmes in the crucial months before the shootings was Hillary Allen, a fellow graduate student on the neuroscience programme at CU Denver.

In class he didn’t really take notes, so that was something that made me jealous because I was vigorously writing notes down… it seemed like he got a lot of work done in his lab and he seemed very successful. I remember thinking like, ‘Wow, James is very smart, he’s very intelligent’”

Sometimes the friendship was hard work.

“He was kind of quiet and kept to himself. He did have a kind of a quirky sense of humour,” says Allen.

“We were part of a group of scientists so I think everyone’s a bit odd. Maybe he was a little bit more odd than the rest of us, maybe more socially awkward.”

Socially awkward. It’s a phrase that comes up time and again to describe Holmes. It’s what led him to make contact with the university counselling department in the spring of 2012, just months before the shootings.

Cracks had started to appear in Holmes’s apparently effortless success. Over the Christmas break he was diagnosed with glandular fever. Tired and ill for the first couple of months of 2012, he kept going to classes, but his work was going downhill.

The shy and anxious Holmes found giving presentations in front of his classmates particularly hard.

His first proper relationship with fellow graduate student Gargi Datta had also come to an end. Datta didn’t want to speak to me, but according to Arlene Holmes the break-up hit her son hard.

I think he loved her. He did say that she wanted to still see him again, which he found difficult to understand since they were broken up

“It was a cordial break-up. That’s the word he used, ‘cordial’. They both parted as friends.”

It was Datta who suggested Holmes seek help at the campus student wellness centre. On 21 March 2012, James Holmes had his first appointment there with psychiatrist Dr Lynne Fenton.

Sifting through the mountain of court testimony and evidence, this date sticks out.

Does it – as the prosecution would argue – mark the point at which Holmes first acknowledges he’s struggling mentally in the perfect storm of his relationship breakdown, academic problems and long-standing social anxiety? A storm that explains why he decided he had nothing to lose and everything to gain from killing as many people as he could?

Or was that date significant – as David Healy would say – because it was the day Lynne Fenton prescribed to James Holmes the antidepressant, sertraline?

Mania

First page of Holmes’s notebook

In his first meeting with Lynne Fenton, Holmes was hard to engage but described his anxiety around people. And during that 45-minute session worrying details emerged that he’d never talked about with his family.

Holmes said he was having thoughts of killing people three or four times a day.

Although it sounds alarming, Fenton didn’t regard him as dangerous at that point. The thoughts were abstract, there was no plan or, it seemed, any real intent. She prescribed the antidepressant sertraline to ease his anxiety and obsessive thoughts.

Holmes in custody

Holmes in custody

In later prison interviews with court-appointed forensic psychiatrist Dr William Reid, Holmes said he’d had intrusive thoughts like this since his teens. Not of actually killing people, rather of wishing them dead to escape from awkward social situations.

According to Reid, these kinds of intrusive thoughts are not uncommon.

“He wasn’t talking about a vengeful hatred,” he says. “He was talking about an aversion to mankind. Being around much of mankind was uncomfortable to him and it wasn’t very rewarding to him so he wanted to avoid it.”

With hindsight, it provides a clear motive, according to Colorado District Attorney, George Brauchler, who successfully prosecuted the case. He says Holmes had a long-standing hatred of mankind – that’s why he killed so many people.

As he puts it, Holmes was “evil”.

District Attorney, George Brauchler

District Attorney, George Brauchler

Brauchler says Holmes kept his evil desires at bay until it became clear he wasn’t going to get what he wanted to be happy.

He’s not going to get that PhD, he’s not going to find that woman to love and have that house with those two kids and the dog. And that’s when he turns his sights on this lifelong passion that he’s had to kill other people and that’s when we see him start to set these things in motion.”

It’s a persuasive argument, and one some experts, and ultimately the jurors, had no trouble in accepting. But the timeline of what happened between Holmes’s first prescription of sertraline and the shootings wasn’t explored at trial.

When you scrutinise that timeline, it raises serious questions about the role of the widely prescribed antidepressant.

Page from Holme’s notebook

Just before he carried out the shootings, Holmes posted to Fenton a notebook he had written in. At times rambling, it gives some contemporaneous insight into his troubled mind. Both William Reid and David Healy agree it’s a valuable piece of evidence.

Holmes wrote about the initial effects of going on sertraline.

No effect when needed. First appearance of mania occurs, not good mania. Anxiety and fear disappears. No more fear, no more fear of failure. Fear of failure drove determination to improve, better and succeed in life. No fear of consequences.”

The first evidence that his thoughts of killing were turning real came in an online conversation with Gargi Datta on 25 March, four days after starting on sertraline.

At Holmes’s trial, Datta testified that at first she thought he was joking.

But as she challenged him, the details of his delusional theory spilled out.

This theory about increasing his so-called “human capital” by actually killing people was quite different to the abstract thoughts he’d had up until then about wishing people dead to get out of uncomfortable social situations.

Psychiatrists I’ve spoken to agree it was delusional, a sign of psychosis.

Datta was asked in court if he’d ever said anything delusional before this chat. She confirmed he hadn’t.

Forensic psychiatrist Dr Philip Resnick, from Ohio, was engaged as a prosecution expert. He was not called to give evidence at trial.

Dr Philip Resnick

Dr Philip Resnick

In his first interview on the subject, he told me the “human capital” conversation with Datta was a key moment.

“I don’t think we have evidence of a plan to do it [kill] with an intention to do it before the human capital theory,” he says.

Holmes went back to see psychiatrist Lynne Fenton two days after telling Datta about human capital but he didn’t mention it to her. He did tell Fenton the medication hadn’t helped his obsessive thoughts. She doubled the dose of sertraline from 50mg to 100mg.

David Healy believes this made Holmes’s mental state worse:

There’s every evidence that if the drugs are suiting a person that an increase in the dose might be helpful – and I use these drugs even though they can cause a problem.”

He adds: “But when they are causing a problem, increasing the dose is a recipe for disaster.”

Nearly a fortnight after the dose increase on 9 April, the previously shy and awkward Holmes made a move on his classmate, Hillary Allen. His texts to her became uncharacteristically bold. One hot day he messaged her about the clothes she was wearing in class.

“Oh Hillary, Why yuh gotta distract me with those short shorts…?”

“I remember receiving that and just like kind of blushing and being like, I don’t remember what I said, but kind of trying to laugh it off and just trying not to create an awkward situation,” she says.

For David Healy, this was further evidence of the effect sertraline was having on Holmes.

Aside from the fact that you have a guy who is now actively beginning to think and plan about harming others in a way that he just hadn’t been doing before, you have a change of personality. This is a totally different person.”

At his fourth appointment with Lynne Fenton on 17 April, Holmes told her his homicidal thoughts had increased, though he still didn’t tell her about his human capital delusion. Fenton’s notes of that meeting documented a decline in his mental state.

“Psychotic level thinking… Guarded, paranoid, hostile thoughts he won’t elaborate on,” she wrote.

Whatever effect the sertraline was having, it certainly wasn’t helping. Healy firmly believes the psychotic-level thinking Fenton noted was a consequence of the medication.

At this appointment, Fenton upped the dose to 150mg. At Holmes’s trial she told the court this was the dose she had always been aiming for.

“It isn’t on her radar that this drug could be causing the kinds of problems that he’s having,” Healy says.

Fenton declined to be interviewed, but a statement from the University of Colorado Denver says patient-doctor confidentiality laws forbid her from talking about Holmes’s care without his consent, which he has not given.

The ‘mission’

By May, Holmes’s “mission”, as he later described it, got real. He began spending large amounts of money accumulating
weapons. In the notebook he wrote:

Starts small. Buy stungun and folding knife. Research gun laws and mental illness. Buy handgun. Committed. Shotgun, AR-15, 2nd handgun…”

By this time, Holmes’s coursework had badly deteriorated. He gave a disastrous final presentation and then failed his exams. He was offered the chance to re-sit but on 11 June dropped out of university. Just before that, he had one last meeting with psychiatrist Lynne Fenton and her colleague.

Holmes's final presentation

Holmes’s final presentation

They were so concerned by his state of mind at this appointment they offered to keep treating him free of charge, but Holmes refused. Fenton had the power to detain Holmes under a mental health hold, but she told his trial she felt there were insufficient grounds.

She did contact the campus security team to ask for criminal-record and weapon-permit checks. Holmes was given the all clear. He never told Fenton about the weapons he’d bought or the plans he was making.

Fenton also called Holmes’s mother.

“She said, ‘Do you know that he is not going to continue in school?’” Arlene tells me. “I thought that was the purpose of her phone call, and I said, ‘Did he ask you to call me?’ And she said, ‘No he didn’t want me to call you and he didn’t want you to worry.’

I was reassured by her phone call, rather than alarmed. I said, ‘My husband and I both work, we can pay you out of pocket to keep seeing him, I’m glad he’s getting some help for social anxiety.’ I didn’t know that she would never see him again, which is what happened.”

Arlene Holmes

BBC Journalist Seeking People Who Have Experienced Withdrawal From SSRI Anti-Depressants For A Documentary…


http://survivingantidepressants.org/index.php?/topic/13214-bbc-journalist-looking-to-expose-problems-of-withdrawal/

https://twitter.com/lesleyashmall?lang=en

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Posted 04 October 2016 – 07:07 AM

I’m a British BBC TV reporter and I want to make a film about the problems of withdrawing from antidepressants. I’m keen to hear from people who’ve struggled with SSRIs, particularly if you like in the UK. Also what you think about the lack of support groups, or if you HAVE a support group, how do you help?

Please email me your stories, confidentially at first, of course, although ultimately I’m looking for people who will be willing to stand up and speak about what’s happened to them.  I think few people know or report this sort of problem and I know many of you are really really struggling for help.  My BBC2 programme wants to expose all this, so please get in touch.

Lesley.ashmall@bbc.co.uk

Thank you very much.  This forum has been recommended to me by several long-term members, so forgive my intrusion.

Letters From Generation RX (by Kevin P Miller)


KevinP

I thought it might be timely re-introduce Kevin P Miller’s documentary (from 2008) Generation RX. Generation RX documents the epidemic of prescription drug addiction (such as dependence on psych drugs like SSRI’s Paxil etc) and the havoc and damage these drugs cause in people’s lives.  Kevin’s new documentary is a follow up to the original, it’s called Letters From Generation RX, and it should be on general release very soon.

Check it out.

I Am Fish Head: Brilliant Documentary On The Sociopaths/Psychopaths That Run Our Modern World


dc0f60d0-c53a-11e1-940d-00144feabdc0 gsk5

“A fish rots from the head down”

(scroll up to 30 mins for the section on anti-depressants)

https://truthman30.wordpress.com/2015/07/03/the-us-department-of-justice-legal-complaint-against-gsk-2012/ http://uk.businessinsider.com/psychopath-jon-ronson-ceo-traits-2015-5?r=US&IR=T


We talked to Jon Ronson, author of New York Times bestseller “The Psychopath Test: A Journey Through the Madness Industry,” about which specific personality traits you should look for when trying to spot a psychopath.


June 14, 2011 @ 1:46 PM 230,143 views
Why (Some) Psychopaths Make Great CEOs
Jeff Bercovici , Forbes Staff Author Jon Ronson.
Photo credit: Barney Poole
British journalist Jon Ronson immersed himself in the world of mental health diagnosis and criminal profiling to understand what makes some people psychopaths — dangerous predators who lack the behavioral controls and tender feelings the rest of us take for granted. Among the things he learned while researching his new book, “The Psychopath Test: A Journey Through the Madness Industry”: the incidence of psychopathy among CEOs is about 4 percent, four times what it is in the population at large. I spoke with him recently about what that means and its implications for the business world and wider society. Are we really to understand that there’s some connection between what makes people psychopaths and what makes them CEO material? At first I was really skeptical because it seemed like an easy thing to say, almost like a conspiracy theorist’s type of thing to say. I remember years and years ago a conspiracy theorist telling me the world was ruled by blood-drinking, baby-sacrificing lizards.
These psychologists were essentially saying the same thing.
Basically, when you get them talking, these people [ie. psychopaths] are different than human beings. They lack the things that make you human: empathy, remorse, loving kindness. So at first I thought this might just be psychologists feeling full of themselves with their big ideological notions. But then I met Al Dunlap. [That would be “Chainsaw” Al Dunlap, former CEO of Sunbeam and notorious downsizer.] He effortlessly turns the psychopath checklist into “Who Moved My Cheese?” Many items on the checklist he redefines into a manual of how to do well in capitalism. There was his reputation that he was a man who seemed to enjoy firing people, not to mention the stories from his first marriage — telling his first wife he wanted to know what human flesh tastes like, not going to his parents’ funerals. Then you realize that because of this dysfunctional capitalistic society we live in those things were positives. He was hailed and given high-powered jobs, and the more ruthlessly his administration behaved, the more his share price shot up. So you can just go down the list of Fortune 500 CEOs and say, “psychopath, psychopath, psychopath…” Well, no. Dunlap was an exceptional figure, wasn’t he? An extreme figure.
I think my book offers really good evidence that the way that capitalism is structured really is a physical manifestation of the brain anomaly known as psychopathy. However, I wouldn’t say every Fortune 500 chief is a psychopath. That would turn me into an ideologue and I abhor ideologues. Is it an either/or thing? It seems to me, thinking about it, that a lot of the traits on the checklist would be be useful in a corporate ladder-climbing situation. So maybe there are a lot of CEOs who simply have some psychopathic tendencies.
It is a spectrum, but there’s a cutoff point. If you’re going by the Hare checklist [the standard inventory used in law enforcement, devised by leading researcher Robert Hare], where the top score is 40, the average anxiety-ridden business failure like me — although the fact that my book just made the Times best sellers list makes it difficult to call myself that — would score a 4 or 5. Somebody you have to be wary of would be in early 20s and a really hard core damaged person, a really dangerous psychopath, would score around a 30. In law the cutoff is 29.
There are absolutes in psychopathy and the main absolute is a literal absence of empathy. It’s just not there. In higher-scoring psychopaths, what grows in the vacant field where that empathy should be is a joy in manipulating people, a lack of remorse, a lack of guilt. If you’ve got a little bit of empathy, you’re kind of not a psychopath.

In Defense of Shane Clancy: “A Search for Justice: Death in Bray” (TV3 Ireland Documentary airing on Monday, March 10th 2014)


Before I begin this blog post, I would like to offer my  sincere condolences to all those affected by this, the loss must be unimaginable, for Sebastian Creane, his family, and to Jennifer Hannigan and her family, and of course to Leonie, for Shane, and Shane’s family. Many people have suffered in this. Many people have been affected. This is a terrible tragedy which is difficult for many to comprehend, and understandably so.

   However, I sincerely believe that this tragedy would not have happened had Shane, or his family, been warned of the potential side effects of SSRI drugs. SSRI side effects such as Akathisa, agitation, anxiety, aggression, impulsivity, homicidal and suicidal ideation, are commonly reported from patients on SSRI’s. They are even written in the Patient information leaflets now (although that’s more to cover drug companies from lawsuits than a humane act on their part, and also hardly anyone looks at the PIL, particularly young people, therefore it’s close to useless).

   I have had these side effects whilst on SSRI’s and I have talked to many others who have experienced them also. There is a massive culture of denial within mainstream psychiatry because it is a pandora’s box which- if opened- would destroy the credibility of psychiatric drugs. If psychiatric drugs are perceived as unsafe then this undermines psychiatry. The industry and psychiatry have a vested interest in keeping the public in the dark about this. I don’t just think this, it’s a fact, and it is well known by those of us involved in bringing the truth about these drugs to public consciousness.

   These facts cannot bring back a loved one, but they are significant for trying to understand why tragedies like this occur. One brilliant website which has documented SSRI murder/suicides is AntiDepAware. What has been correlated here on this site is quite staggering, and in my opinion the evidence is irrefutable now. Shane’s case, is one of many, and anyone on an SSRI could end up in a similar situation, and the real tragedy is- the public are mostly completely unaware. These tragedies could have been avoided if people were adequately warned, but the pharmaceutical industry and psychiatry do not want to be held accountable, therefore they continue to deny. Furthermore, the profits on these drugs are obscene, and profit and money is the bottom line here.

On Monday the 10th of March, Irish channel TV3, will air a documentary about the Shane Clancy tragedy called: “A search for justice: death in Bray. I wrote about Shane when this tragic event happened (see here and here) and it might seem premature writing a post before this documentary airs but I feel before the media spin kicks in, it is appropriate, as many important aspects might get lost in the sensationalism which will inevitably follow.

   The reason why I first wrote about Shane, and why I care about all this- is because -like Shane, I was prescribed an SSRI drug for depression (mine was Seroxat, Shane’s was Cipramil). I was also around Shane’s age when this happened. I was 21, and Shane was 22. It was also, like in Shane’s case- my mother who brought me to a psychiatrist and a GP initially- because she was desperate to help alleviate the sheer despair I was experiencing from crippling depression. Shane’s mother Leonie, did the same thing as my mother, (as any mother would) and like myself and my mother, Leonie and Shane were not warned of the possible dangerous side effects from SSRI drugs. Effectively, there was no informed consent. None of us were warned. This is appalling.

   I will never forget the awful feeling in the first few days and weeks of taking Seroxat. I remember the swooshing, dizzying, giddy- unreality buzzing in my mind, as the chemical began to course through the blood into my brain. I went from being severely depressed, to severely out of my head. I would get these rushes and shivers, my eyes would roll and the world felt all lopsided. My teeth would clench, my jaw muscles would clench, and I’d get audio hallucinations during the day, and Stephen King style nightmares and sweats at night. If I stood up too quickly I would almost faint as my blood pressure was affected from the SSRI. I would stupor, and my eyes were like pinholes, I looked like a junkie. I would dribble on myself, as I sat numbed like a vegetable watching day time TV- as the levels of Seroxat accumulated, I felt more and more careless, more and more distant from me, my family and my surroundings. I became completely de-personalized.

   It was undoubtedly a drugged up state, but not the kind of drugged up state which you would imagine these so called ‘happy pills’ to be. There was no happy-ness, no bliss, just a feeling of numbness, inhibition, blur and muddled confusion. A buzzy blur, an incoherency of thoughts and feelings all day, everything just out of whack and out of sync. As the weeks and months went on, and the Seroxat pills went down, I began to feel aggressive, particularly towards my family, I would snap at them and often they were afraid of me, or afraid of what the drug was doing to me, what I was becoming. The night sweats and nightmares turned into night spasms and horrifically violent dreams which scared the hell out me. I would wake up terrified, horrified that my mind could conjure up scenes of such horrible violence and mayhem. On a few occasions in the first few months on Seroxat I lashed out at my mother and my sister, and at one point I chased my father around his house, with every intention of attacking him. He rang the police and I left, like a possessed madman, slamming his door and shattering the glass. This aggression was completely and utterly out of character for me, I am the most passive, non confrontational person in the world. I have no doubt it was the effects of the SSRI. No doubts at all. SSRI’s can push some people over the edge. The creators of this website (SSRI stories) have collected 5000 media examples of SSRI suicides, homicides, rage etc. That, is likely- the tip of the iceberg.

   Since coming off Seroxat over 10 years ago, I have sought to inform and educate others and make them aware of the dangers of SSRI medications. I have spoken to others who have experienced the same effects. I have met government ministers, journalists, psychiatrists, educators, activists, the gamut of professions. I have tried my best to get the truth out there about Seroxat and SSRI’s. These drugs can be very dangerous for some people. It’s like Russian roulette- nobody knows how severe the side effects will be. The drug companies lie, the psychiatrists deceive, there are vested interests hell bent on keeping the extent of the damage of these drugs hidden and obscured. Depression does not make people violent or volatile, but SSRI’s can induce these affects in those who take them- it is only since the advent of the SSRI anti-depressant age that we have witnessed so many cases like the Clancy case. This is not fiction, conspiracy theories or random accounts, these are documented cases. These are facts.

   I hope that this documentary gives a fair and objective account of SSRI dangers, but I have a feeling that the drug companies and psychiatry will do everything in their power to defend the drugs and blame Shane. Psychiatry always blames the patient, and psychiatry is the pharmaceutical industry’s apologist. That’s a well known fact. Psychiatry and the pharmaceutical industry are two branches of the same tree, intertwined

I look forward to blogging more after the documentary is aired. But for now I will leave these videos here about SSRI’s, violence, volatility, and disturbing side effects, they are essential viewing. (there are hundreds more on youtube)

Antidepressant Side Effects

GlaxoSmithKline Ruins Lives : Seroxat Still Relevant 10 Years Later


GSK have a lot to answer for. They one of the most corrupt and despicable corporations  on the planet… 10 years later… hundreds of suicides, birth defects, and multiples of damages to consumers from the drug… and they still sell this Seroxat Crap to consumers… 

http://www.theguardian.com/uk/2003/aug/10/drugsandalcohol.jorevill

Robber cleared by drug defence

Charges dropped after report links Seroxat to threatening behaviour
, health editor
The Observer, Sunday 10 August 2003

A man arrested for armed robbery and theft has had charges against him dropped after medical experts concluded that his behaviour could have been altered by the severe withdrawal symptoms he was experiencing from the antidepressant Seroxat.Mark Douglas-Hamilton, who was facing a prison sentence for holding up a garage, was due to go on trial this week, but the case has been unexpectedly dropped by the Crown Prosecution Service.The CPS has not given any reason for its decision to discontinue, but it is believed that Douglas-Hamilton was helped by a medical report carried out for the defence which concluded that the drug could have contributed to his threatening behaviour.Campaigners against Seroxat, whose generic name is paroxetine, say they are aware of at least 10 other families who claim that their relatives committed acts of violence as they withdrew from the medication.

Their cases will be put later this month to the Government’s Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Authority (MHRA), which is reviewing Seroxat.

The move comes as the Department of Health said last night it would examine the unlicensed sale of pre scription drugs on the internet following an Observer investigation today exposing the cybernet trade in such drugs, including Seroxat.

The drug’s manufacturer, GlaxoSmithKline, denies violence is a feature of withdrawing from Seroxat arguing that aggression is a feature of anxiety disorders.

However, Douglas-Hamilton’s account of how he suffered serious personality changes while trying to come off the pills has implications for other patients who also reported feeling extremely aggressive and reckless once they stopped taking the drug.

In November last year, two days after coming off the pills, Douglas-Hamilton, 30, used a pair of wire cutters to hold up a garage in Oxford where he walked away with a packet of cigarettes. A CCTV recording of the event shows his bizarre behaviour, where he joked with customers. Two weeks later, the theatre stage manager stole some CDs from a record shop. Douglas-Hamilton says he committed the acts, but claims his personality and behaviour were completely altered by the withdrawal effects of the drug.

‘I’m a fairly timid guy,’ he told The Observer last week. ‘I had only been prescribed [Seroxat] because I suffered from anxiety and some depression. It seemed to destroy my conscience and my fear. I found myself walking out of the house with knives; I had every intention of killing people.’

Douglas-Hamilton, who lives near Hereford, was due to face trial this week in Oxford on two charges of theft. But the case was unexpectedly dropped last Thursday by the CPS, which did not give a reason for the discontinuance .

Had the trial gone ahead, it could have proved a test case. Douglas-Hamilton would have pleaded not guilty, using a defence known as non-insane automatism. This argues that there is some external factor, in this case Seroxat, which was out of the defendant’s control, and caused him to behave irrationally. Dr David Taylor of the Maudsley Hospital had prepared a report for the defence, passed to the CPS, which concluded that the effects of Seroxat could have contributed to his behaviour.

The drug, which is prescribed to thousands of people every year for anxiety and depression, is already the subject of some controversy. Last year, SmithKline Beecham, which became GlaxoSmithKline, was successfully sued by Toby Tobin, after his father-in-law Donald Schell killed himself, his wife, his daughter and daughter-in-law in Wyoming, US. The company was ordered to pay £4.7million to the family. Schell had taken just two tablets before the murders, and had been depressed, but not suicidal, for the past 10 years.

There have also been claims from families in Britain that it has pushed relatives into suicide, and caused serious withdrawal symptoms. Sarah Venn, spokeswoman for the Seroxat Users’ Group, said: ‘I’m aware of at least 10 families whose children have committed criminal acts on withdrawal, and whose behaviour appears out of character. The MHRA needs to consider this as part of its review.’

A spokeswoman for GlaxoSmithKline said: ‘Violence and aggression are a feature of anxiety and depression disorders. Seroxat will reduce levels of these, and neither violence or aggression are withdrawal symptoms.’

In November last year, two days after coming off the pills, Douglas-Hamilton, 30, used a pair of wire cutters to hold up a garage in Oxford where he walked away with a packet of cigarettes. A CCTV recording of the event shows his bizarre behaviour, where he joked with customers. Two weeks later, the theatre stage manager stole some CDs from a record shop. Douglas-Hamilton says he committed the acts, but claims his personality and behaviour were completely altered by the withdrawal effects of the drug.

‘I’m a fairly timid guy,’ he told The Observer last week. ‘I had only been prescribed [Seroxat] because I suffered from anxiety and some depression. It seemed to destroy my conscience and my fear. I found myself walking out of the house with knives; I had every intention of killing people.’

Douglas-Hamilton, who lives near Hereford, was due to face trial this week in Oxford on two charges of theft. But the case was unexpectedly dropped last Thursday by the CPS, which did not give a reason for the discontinuance .

Had the trial gone ahead, it could have proved a test case. Douglas-Hamilton would have pleaded not guilty, using a defence known as non-insane automatism. This argues that there is some external factor, in this case Seroxat, which was out of the defendant’s control, and caused him to behave irra tionally. Dr David Taylor of the Maudsley Hospital had prepared a report for the defence, passed to the CPS, which concluded that the effects of Seroxat could have contributed to his behaviour.

The drug, which is prescribed to thousands of people every year for anxiety and depression, is already the subject of some controversy. Last year, Smith Kline Beecham, which became GlaxoSmithKline, was successfully sued by Toby Tobin, after his father-in-law Don ald Schell killed himself, his wife, his daughter and daughter-in-law in Wyoming, US. The company was ordered to pay £4.7million to the family. Schell had taken just two tablets before the murders, and had been depressed, but not suicidal, for the past 10 years.

There have also been claims from families in Britain that it has pushed relatives into suicide, and caused serious withdrawal symptoms. Sarah Venn, spokeswoman for the Seroxat Users’ Group, said: ‘I’m aware of at least 10 families whose children have committed criminal acts on withdrawal, and whose behaviour appears out of character. The MHRA needs to consider this as part of its review.’

A spokeswoman for GlaxoSmithKline said: ‘Violence and aggression are a feature of anxiety and depression disorders. Seroxat will reduce levels of these, and neither violence or aggression are withdrawal symptoms.’