GSK’s False Seroxat Suicide Statistics: Was Paroxetine A Misservice To Public Health Or Merely An Error?..


In this video, former GSK executive (and psychiatrist), Jeffrey Dunbar, gives his deposition, in a Paxil (Seroxat) induced suicide trial from 2006.

This is really astounding footage to watch.


Former GlaxoSmithKline executive Dr. Geoffrey Dunbar deposition in Paxil suicide case. In his testimony, Dr. Dunbar says that he helped author the drafts of the Paxil suicide report that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) asked for in 1991. The calculations in this report showed and suggested that instead of Paxil increasing the suicide risk by nearly 9 times, the drug decreased suicidal behavior.

He admits in his deposition that his reports include improperly counted suicidal behavior events and that publications in which he participated writing had incorrectly conveyed Paxil reduced suicidal behavior.

This deposition was played for the jury in the trial of Dolin v. Smithkline Beecham Corp. (D/B/A GlaxoSmithKline-GSK). The case stems from the alleged paroxetine-induced death of Stewart Dolin, a partner at the law firm Reed Smith. Paroxetine is the brand name version of this medication is called Paxil which was researched, developed, manufactured and marketed by GlaxoSmithKline (“GSK”).

The lawsuit claims that GSK failed to adequately warn Mr. Dolin’s doctor about Paxil/paroxetine’s association with an increased risk of suicidal behavior in adults of all ages. According to the lawsuit, when Mr. Dolin was prescribed paroxetine in 2010, the drug’s label did not accurately warn physicians of the drug’s association with an increased risk of suicidal behavior in adults, despite GSK’s 2006 analysis showing a statistically significant 6.7 times greater risk in adults of all ages, as well as comparable statistically significant suicidal behavior evidence as far back as 1989 in Paxil’s clinical trials performed for its initial marketing approval.

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