Interesting Comment About Seroxat On Dr David Healy’s Latest Blog Post..


On Dr David Healy’s latest post about the ‘continuation phase’ in the Seroxat (Paxil) study 329 trials, the mother of a young man harmed by Seroxat raised a very important point.

Heather asks:

why suddenly at age 18 it is safe to take Seroxat, whereas up to that age, classed as ‘child’ or ‘teen’ it isn’t. Does the brain suddenly change on one’s 18 the birthday? “

This is an interesting question which I have covered many times on my blog. Why is Seroxat considered dangerous for under 18’s (it’s banned in this age group) but safe for older than 18? Is this simply because GSK expect an 18 year old (legally classed as an adult) to be old enough to take responsibility for the possible risk to their life from ingesting a dangerous drug like Seroxat? Similar to the way alcohol and cigarettes are also substances only allowed for over 18’s?

Despite having raised this issue many times, it seems nobody can give a clear answer as to why a drug banned for under-18’s- because it increases rates of suicidal impulses and behaviors, self harm, and aggression- is apparently safe enough for adults to take?

According to Dr Healy:

“The effects of the drug are the same in all age brackets. There is nothing in particular about youth.”

If there is nothing in particular about youth, and the effects are the same for all age brackets with Seroxat, then why is it sold on the adult market?

It doesn’t make sense to me..

Perhaps someone can explain it to me?

http://davidhealy.org/study-329-continuation-phase/#comments

 

I would like to understand why suddenly at age 18 it is safe to take Seroxat, whereas up to that age, classed as ‘child’ or ‘teen’ it isn’t. Does the brain suddenly change on one’s 18 the birthday? We always understood that young brain is not fully formed till age 24, is it something to do with parental responsibility changing at 18 when you become an adult.

Our very slim 21 year old took it for first time then and was never the same again. He stopped it after a few months and had such terrible panic attacks he had to leave Uni in his second year. We and he never guessed it was the drug, His girlfriend at Uni was Portugese. Her mother was a pathologist. In 2002/3 she rang me to warn me about problems with Seroxat, so she must have had good medical info over in Portugal. We tried to talk this through with his Hereford psychiatrist and he became angry and stopped us visiting our son in hospital, who was by then suicidal and saying he had to go ‘cos he was needed in heaven, as there was special work there for him to do’. Even MIND would not help us raise the subject with the arrogant psychiatrist. Meantime the pathologist in Portugal was desperate for him. He had been all set for a first class degree. He had worried about his acne, sure, but was never ever suicidal like he became on both RoAccutane/ isotretinoin and Seroxat.

Time and again, a young person becomes uncharacteristically ill in their thoughts on this drug but the parents are not listened to. Our son kept blaming himself for his suicidal thoughts and the medics accepted his own verdict, but it was obvious to us that he was out of his mind so that’s why he wasn’t making any sense. I just don’t understand why the Portugese medical people were ringing alarm bells in 2002/3 and in UK, we were not.

  • H

    The effects of the drug are the same in all age brackets. There is nothing in particular about youth.

    DH

Published by

truthman30

An Ex-Seroxat User , here to bring a deeper awareness of the Scandal that is Seroxat .

3 thoughts on “Interesting Comment About Seroxat On Dr David Healy’s Latest Blog Post..”

  1. I totally concur with your straightforward train of thought here …….. and your straightforward question deserves a straightforward answer – but won’t get one, will it?
    Also, we need to be mindful that, as well as Seroxat, there’s a whole range of SSRIs and other medications which do the same damage ……. ANSWERS, please Big Pharma !!!

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