Seroxat Effects In Adults… Seroxat Effects In Children… What’s The Difference?


“…Andrew Isaac from Neath, from the Seroxat Users Group in Wales, said an urgent review needs to be carried out into the effects of the drug on adults..”

BBC 2003

“….Nobody has retracted or apologized for a study that was an academic disgrace—but a marketing coup for GSK—which may well have caused untold numbers of deaths, suicide attempts and irreversible anguish to myriad families….

The sociopathic lack of remorse and moral consciousness shown by GSK, Keller, et al., became most shockingly apparent early on, in GSK’s serial re-writing and occlusion of troubling data — designed to stop negative results leaking out to doctors, the public or their sales staff. In fact, a GSK internal memo showed that the company knew that their studies had failed to demonstrate efficacy since at least 1998; and in 2003 the MHRA revealed that GSK’s own studies showed that the drug actually trebles the risk of suicidal thoughts and behaviour in depressed children.

Outside the Holocaust, I’ve never come across a more chilling, amoral or sociopathic memo than the one they sent out to senior management, clarifying their decision “to effectively manage the dissemination of these data in order to minimize any potential negative commercial impact…It would be commercially unacceptable to include a statement that efficacy had not been demonstrated, as this would undermine the profile of paroxetine.”

Mad In America 2015

I was prescribed Seroxat when I was 21, yet a few years after I was prescribed it, it was banned for under-18’s because it was deemed too dangerous in that age group..

What difference would Seroxat have on the mind and body of a 19, 20 or 21 year old individual in terms of side effects?

Is a 21 year old that different in terms of how a drug affects them when compared to a 16 or 17 year old for example.

Why does the regulator deem Seroxat to be safe for adults? yet unsafe for under-18’s?

It clearly is not safe for adults, it’s not safe period.

An immeasurable amount of damage over almost two decades, from a dodgy drug (made by an even dodgier drug company) and sold and pushed upon a very vulnerable demographic (suicides, loss, pain, suffering, birth defects, violence)…

Astonishing isn’t it?

The following article, from the BBC, is from 2003, that’s 13 years ago now..

 

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/wales/north_east/2982056.stm

Mother’s plea over Seroxat

Shane Cooke

Shane Cooke was prescribed Seroxat

A Flintshire teacher who believes an anti-depressant drug triggered violence in her foster son said new guidelines outlining the dangers of taking Seroxat do not go far enough. The Medicines and Healthcare Regulatory Agency(MHRA) has ruled that Seroxat should not be given to children and teenagers because of evidence that it can increase self-harm and suicidal thoughts in people under 18.

Special needs teacher Mary Hennessey, from Rhewl near Holywell, thinks the health watchdog should have gone further.

Her foster son Shane Cooke was jailed after smashing his car through the doors of a psychiatric unit in Bodelwyddan.

She said the incident was one of three which occurred while he was taking Seroxat.

I think they urgently need to look into the effects on adults
Mary Hennessey

“Shane suffered rage attacks and also had these urges to commit suicide,” she said.

“He’d never, ever had anything like this before, he’d never been in any sort of trouble or anything before.”

The announcement on Tuesday that the drug should not be issued to under-18s follows a review which found children taking the anti-depressant may be more likely to self-harm or suicidal behaviour.

The Department of Health launched the review of Seroxat and similar drugs, known as SSRIs (Selective Serotonin Re-uptake Inhibitors) in January.

Mrs Hennessey said if the drug is dangerous for children under the age of 18, it must effect those over that age too.

“I think they urgently need to look into the effects on adults,” she said.

Suicide

“I would agree that for many, many people Seroxat has been a blessing but we’ve got to take more notice of the fact that for some it can cause havoc.

“As it was with Shane he had no idea that there could’ve been any of these sort of reactions to it.”

Andrew Isaac from Neath, from the Seroxat Users Group in Wales, said an urgent review needs to be carried out into the effects of the drug on adults.

“There are worries that more adults might go and commit suicide or portray suicidal behaviour,” he said.

The makers of the drug, GlaxoSmithkline, said they supported the MHRA’s decision but added that the benefits of Seroxat were well established.

Dr David Healy, a north Wales psychiatrist, said further research was required into Seroxat.

“The MHRA have recognised problems for one drug in one age group but the risks don’t stop when you leave your teens,” he said.

“This drug and others need to come with the right warning.”

 

SEE ALSO:
Anti-depressant safety reviewed
08 Jan 03  |  Health
Glaxo denies Seroxat problems
13 Oct 02  |  Panorama


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2 comments

  1. sarah25m

    “The makers of the drug, GlaxoSmithkline, said they supported the MHRA’s decision but added that the benefits of Seroxat were well established.”
    Perhaps the exaggeration of its efficacy by GSK encouraged many doctors to prescribe indiscriminately. That would certainly increase sales. But increased sales does not equal increased efficacy. I realize many people do benefit from Seroxat and other antidepressants. Maybe their doctors understand the limits and dangers of drug treatment and provide adequate information and follow up.

    .

    • truthman30

      Well, GSK are not going to admit Seroxat has no benefits are they?
      The sales are from addicts, mostly..
      Heroin is very popular and so is coke..
      But sales don’t mean efficacy ..

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