Boy, 12, left disabled by his swine flu jab wins £120,000 compensation payout after three-year legal battle by his family


Boy, 12, left disabled by his swine flu jab wins £120,000 compensation payout after three-year legal battle by his family

  • The vaccine triggered debilitating narcolepsy that has ruined the boy’s life
  • Opens the door for 100 more families who believe the jab caused problems
  • Others lost jobs and dropped out of university due to the sleeping disease 

A young boy left severely disabled by the swine flu vaccine has been awarded £120,000 in damages after a three-year legal battle by his family.

Lawyers for the 12-year-old successfully argued that the vaccine had triggered debilitating narcolepsy in the boy.

He has only one friend, struggles in school and may never be able to drive as a result.

Devastating: The impact of the vaccine has ruined the lives of those who suffered narcolepsy as a result

Devastating: The impact of the vaccine has ruined the lives of those who suffered narcolepsy as a result

The Government had insisted the rare sleeping disorder ‘was not serious enough’ for compensation to be paid.

But the illness has left the boy, whose family asked to remain anonymous, unable to get the bus or even shower by himself, according to a report in the Guardian.

The ruling open the doors for compensation claims from 100 other families who believe their children were affected by the jab.

The Pandemrix vaccine was administered to six million people in the UK during the swine flu outbreak of 2009 and 2010. Scientists now believe it triggered narcolepsy – a rare life-long brain disorder which sees the sufferer fall asleep in random locations at inappropriate times – in a handful of cases..

Other alleged victims have lost their jobs and dropped out of university after the disease made daily life unbearable.

Peter Todd, the solicitor for the boy’s family, told The Guardian: ‘They felt quite insulted to have their condition basically dismissed as something quite trivial.

‘They are incredibly needy. Some have lost their jobs, dropped out of university or seen their marriages break down as a result.’

Mr Todd is representing 74 other families who believe they have been affected in the same way.

The upper tribunal heard that the child’s extreme tiredness had made him ‘disruptive’ at school and unable to socialise with his peers.

A similar case is being brought by the family of Mathilda Crisp, who was just three years-old when she got the jab.

Mathilda was the youngest known person in the world to be diagnosed with the sleeping disorder.

Her mother Claire is seeking compensation from the government after the little girl started suffering terrifying nocturnal hallucinations and excruciating pain.

Claire, 44, a former NHS physiotherapist, thought she was playing safe when she had Mathilda vaccinated.

Cure: It was introduced to save children from the impact of swine flu but had an unexpected effect on some

Cure: It was introduced to save children from the impact of swine flu but had an unexpected effect on some

Doctors had suggested her daughter could be at particular risk from respiratory trouble from swine flu because she was born with a minor throat condition, laryngomalacia, which obstructs breathing. Children normally grow out of it by three.

‘We took the swine flu risk seriously since Mathilda had only recently outgrown laryngomalacia,’ says Claire, who also has a son, Elliot, and another daughter, Liberty.

But Mathilda’s first troubling symptoms developed within two weeks of the jab.

Her sleep became disturbed, leaving her exhausted in the day. Then she began to suffer from hallucinations at night, thinking there were demons in her bedroom.

Within six months, Claire and her husband Oliver, a professor of theology, were housebound caring for Mathilda. She was taken to a children’s hospital for what Claire calls ‘a series of failed visits’.

Initially, doctors thought she had a brain tumour, but after tests they ruled that out. ‘The doctors quickly wrote us off as an anxious mother and a pain-in-the-a*** child.’

The family was being referred to a psychiatric unit when a locum doctor from India diagnosed narcolepsy, which normally appears at around the age of 15.

Stanford University in California finally confirmed a diagnoses of narcolepsy based on blood samples sent to them.

Last night the Department of Health declined to comment on the case.

A spokesman for the Department of Work and Pensions said: ‘The Vaccine Damage Payments Scheme provides support in very rare cases where someone has become severely disabled as a result of immunisation against certain diseases. Decisions on claims take into account the individual circumstances of each case and the latest available medical evidence.’

He added that they do not comment on individual cases.

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