Former GSK Senior Exec, Chris Viehbacher, Embroiled In Scandal At Sanofi (2014)


http://www.cnbc.com/id/102235774?

Bad medicine: Suit claims ‘kickback’ scheme at Sanofi

Wednesday, 3 Dec 2014 | 3:27 PM ET

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A new lawsuit claims the recently ousted CEO of Sanofi and other executives at the huge drugmaker conducted a scheme in violation of federal law to funnel tens of millions of dollars in kickbacks and other incentives to get the company’s diabetes drugs prescribed and sold.

The whistleblower lawsuit also claims Sanofi CEO Christopher Viehbacher was fired by the company’s board in October “in part, because Defendant Viehbacher was involved in the aforesaid illegal and/or fraudulent activity,” which allegedly went on “over the course of many years.”

Ousted Sanofi CEO Christopher Viehbacher

Eric Piermont | Getty Images
Ousted Sanofi CEO Christopher Viehbacher

The suit filed Wednesday says that Sanofi used contracts that appeared to be for legitimate purposes to direct money to hospitals, doctors and retail pharmacy chains to induce them to purchase and prescribe Sanofi’s diabetes medication. It also claims that “approximately $1 billion is missing from Defendant Sanofi which has not been accounted for.”

Sanofi itself in October cited poor relations between Viehbacher and the board as the reason he was sacked.

Read MoreSanofi ousts CEO after warning on diabetes business

The bombshell new kickback allegations by a Sanofi paralegal named DianePonte—who herself was fired in September after allegedly suffering retaliation for bringing the scheme to light—come two years after the drug company reached an agreement with the Justice Department and several states to pay $109 million to settle claims that it engaged in kickbacks by giving doctors free samples of an arthritis drug as a way to encourage them to buy and prescribe that medication.

Such kickbacks are illegal because they can encourage the prescription of drugs that are covered by federal Medicare and Medicaid insurance programs, and thus have taxpayers foot the bills for medication that might otherwise not have been prescribed.

After that 2012 settlement, Sanofi also had a corporate integrity agreement with the Health and Human Services Department requiring the company to abide by federal health-care laws and to report illegal activities by the company and its employees, Ponte’s suit said. However, a check of HHS’ database of such integrity agreements indicated that pact had not been executed as of yet.

Sanofi on Wednesday indicated it had not yet been served with Ponte’s lawsuit, but in a statement said, “Sanofi does not comment on litigation.”

On Thursday, after reviewing the suit, Sanofi issued a new statement, which said: “Diane Ponte is a disgruntled former employee who is opportunistically attacking our company. Ponte filed for violations of New Jersey state employment law, specifically the New Jersey Conscientious Employee Protection Act (‘CEPA’).”

“The employment law allegations are without merit, and Sanofi will vigorously defend the suit. We take this matter very seriously and will protect our company and our reputation,” Sanofi said.

Ponte’s suit, filed in New Jersey Superior Court in Newark, names as defendants Sanofi, Viehbacher, Sanofi General Counsel Robert DeBerardine and other executives, including Sanofi’s former vice president of its U.S. diabetes business, Dennis Urbaniak, and the ex-assistant vice president of special projects, Raymond Godleski.

“It’s shocking that these people got away with this for so long and then fired this woman for uncovering their wrongdoing,” said Rosemarie Arnold, lawyer for the 53-year-old Ponte. “She was blatantly fired as a result of her whistleblowing activity.”

Hostile work environment alleged

The suit says Sanofi and its managers created a hostile work environment for Ponte after she made her allegations of wrongdoing and created a pretext for her dismissal in September.

The suit said Ponte became aware of the alleged diabetes drug scheme in March 2013, when she received electronic requests for her approval of nine Sanofi contracts worth a total of $34 million—seven contracts with the consulting firm Accenture, and two with the professional services firm Deloitte. Ponte, a 13-year Sanofi veteran, at the time was working in the company’s U.S.headquarters in Bridgewater, New Jersey, in the contracts group, where she was responsible for reviewing contracts.


Views from the cafe-pharma GSK board below:

http://www.cafepharma.com/boards/showthread.php?t=571394

GlaxoSmithKline Anonymous board for GlaxoSmithKline

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#1
Old 12-04-2014, 10:44 PM
Anonymous

Posts: n/a
Default Viehbacher may not be GSK’s White Knight
If there is any truth to these allegations, Viehbacher may not be as available as he seems:

“A new lawsuit claims the recently ousted CEO of Sanofi and other executives at the huge drugmaker conducted a scheme in violation of federal law to funnel tens of millions of dollars in kickbacks and other incentives to get the company’s diabetes drugs prescribed and sold.”
http://www.cnbc.com/id/102235774?

#2
Old 12-05-2014, 06:53 AM
Anonymous

Posts: n/a
Default Re: Viehbacher may not be GSK’s White Knight
Interesting post. If true, CV is yet another executive fraudster among a growing list.
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#3
Old 12-05-2014, 06:58 AM
Anonymous

Posts: n/a
Default Re: Viehbacher may not be GSK’s White Knight
[quote=Anonymous;5289428]If there is any truth to these allegations, Viehbacher may not be as available as he seems:

“A new lawsuit claims the recently ousted CEO of Sanofi and other executives at the huge drugmaker conducted a scheme in violation of federal law to funnel tens of millions of dollars in kickbacks and other incentives to get the company’s diabetes drugs prescribed and sold.”
http://www.cnbc.com/id/102235774?%5B/QUO

This is from one disgruntled employee. Go back to re posting something useful
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#4
Old 12-05-2014, 08:51 AM
Anonymous

Posts: n/a
Default Re: Viehbacher may not be GSK’s White Knight
Disgruntled does not necessarily mean wrong. The 2 guys from GSK who were whistleblowers were disgruntled as well, but they weren’t wrong.

Let the courts decide.
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#5
Old 12-05-2014, 08:17 PM
Anonymous

Posts: n/a
Default Re: Viehbacher may not be GSK’s White Knight
She also claims about $1 billion is missing! That part should be proved/disproved fairly quickly. This isn’t the Pentagon, Sanofi’s accountants must have records somewhere.
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#6
Old 12-11-2014, 08:12 PM
Anonymous

Posts: n/a
Default Re: Viehbacher may not be GSK’s White Knight
We could use the $ 1b
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#7
Old 12-12-2014, 05:26 PM
Anonymous

Posts: n/a
Default Re: Viehbacher may not be GSK’s White Knight
“White Knight?!” You racist
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#8
Old 12-13-2014, 05:26 AM
Anonymous

Posts: n/a
Default Re: Viehbacher may not be GSK’s White Knight
Vie archer is impressive his lack of a morale code have now started a path of destruction at 2 companies.
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2014-1…-baseless.html
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#9
Old 12-13-2014, 09:24 AM
Anonymous

Posts: n/a
Default Re: Viehbacher may not be GSK’s White Knight
Transparency. Respect for People. Integrity. Patient Focused. Maybe not.
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#10
Old 12-13-2014, 01:54 PM
Anonymous

Posts: n/a
Default Re: Viehbacher may not be GSK’s White Knight
Quote:
Originally Posted by Anonymous View Post
Transparency. Respect for People. Integrity. Patient Focused. Maybe not.
This guy was hip deep in the fraud at GSK TOO. Just look at the Lauren Stevens trial transcripts and you will know. He belongs in Prison.

#11
Old 12-13-2014, 02:04 PM
Anonymous

Posts: n/a
Default Re: Viehbacher may not be GSK’s White Knight
Ultimately he is as responsible for PF as anyone else.
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#12
Old 12-14-2014, 08:39 AM
Anonymous

Posts: n/a
Default Re: Viehbacher may not be GSK’s White Knight
Just keeps getting better
Sanofi Is Accused of Using Kickbacks to Encourage Prescribing Diabetes Drugs

According to the complaint, on October 29, 2014, shares of Sanofi fell $2.85 or almost 6% to close at $45.22 on the news of the termination of Chief Executive Officer, Christopher A. Viehbacher. On December 3, 2014, it was reported by various media outlets that a whistleblower lawsuit had been filed by a former Sanofi paralegal. This suit alleges that Viehbacher, along with other executives, violated federal law by funneling tens of millions of dollars in kickbacks and incentives to get the company’s diabetes drugs prescribed and sold. This lawsuit also alleges that Viehbacher was dismissed due to his involvement in the illegal activities, such as kickbacks and incentives, which went on for many years.

The complaint also alleges that Sanofi: (i) was making improper payments to healthcare professionals in connection with the sale of pharmaceutical products in violation of federal law; (ii) lacked adequate internal controls over financial reporting; and (iii) as a result, the company’s public statements were materially false and misleading at all relevant times.
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#13
Old 12-15-2014, 11:46 AM
Anonymous

Posts: n/a
Default Re: Viehbacher may not be GSK’s White Knight
Quote:
Originally Posted by Anonymous View Post
Just keeps getting better
Sanofi Is Accused of Using Kickbacks to Encourage Prescribing Diabetes Drugs

According to the complaint, on October 29, 2014, shares of Sanofi fell $2.85 or almost 6% to close at $45.22 on the news of the termination of Chief Executive Officer, Christopher A. Viehbacher. On December 3, 2014, it was reported by various media outlets that a whistleblower lawsuit had been filed by a former Sanofi paralegal. This suit alleges that Viehbacher, along with other executives, violated federal law by funneling tens of millions of dollars in kickbacks and incentives to get the company’s diabetes drugs prescribed and sold. This lawsuit also alleges that Viehbacher was dismissed due to his involvement in the illegal activities, such as kickbacks and incentives, which went on for many years.

The complaint also alleges that Sanofi: (i) was making improper payments to healthcare professionals in connection with the sale of pharmaceutical products in violation of federal law; (ii) lacked adequate internal controls over financial reporting; and (iii) as a result, the company’s public statements were materially false and misleading at all relevant times.
who cares, go to the Sanofi thread. we have enough problems with our own leadership

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