The Great Glaxo Transparency Swindle… Prof. David Healy says ‘now is the time of greatest peril’…


ben-gBlcxjvbCUAA0GQW-1BGGSK amazing

MasssivehistoricMedSkepbobShellejofre

http://davidhealy.org/welcome-to-troy/#comments

Trojan Horse

The press coverage of AbbVie’s withdrawn legal action suggests that most major companies have now embraced an option for transparency pioneered by GSK.

All Trials are among those taking credit for pressuring AbbVie into submission. They have aggressively welcomed the offer by GSK to make clinical trial data available with no questioning of the terms on which the data is being produced.

But GSK’s offer is a manoeuvre worthy of Ulysses himself. You’d never guess from company self-congratulation that it was forced on GSK by a New York Court as part of the resolution of a Fraud action. The Fraud Action happened because GSK had written up a positive portrayal of a trial when in fact the company itself thought the trial had shown their antidepressant, Paxil, did not work.

The trial – Study 329 – was test of Paxil in children. As mandated by the Courts in the wake of Study 329, GSK put up company study reports for all of their trials, Paxil and other drugs including the diabetes drug Avandia. These could be downloaded. Steve Nissen of the Cleveland Clinic did just this for the Avandia reports and was able to show that Avandia killed.  A company blockbuster was stopped in its tracks.

Poacher turned Game-Keeper?

Putting study results up on the web must have seemed like a very bad idea to GSK. So why are they now championing data access?

GSK and other companies are reaping kudos for apparent transparency. And they can say with a straight face to any TV anchorman or Congressional committee that they are making data available.

But in fact here is what is happening. Having seen what happened with the Avandia study reports GSK now know what to do when writing a Study Report to avoid a repeat. Suitably Doctored Study Reports for other drugs will go up on their website.

The Study Reports however do not contain the data. A first approximation to the data in the case of Study 329 comes in a series of 7 appendices to the 329 Study Report – something GSK did not put up on the company website until the omission was spotted nearly 10 years later by Peter Doshi and New York State required them to do so.

In the case of Study 329, the ghostwritten article that led to GSK being sued for fraud, is 11 pages. The Study Report is over 700 pages. There are then 7 appendices that between them come close to 5500 pages. Even this however is not the raw data.The raw data lies in Clinical Report Forms.

You can Look but you cannot See

As things stood before GSK’s offer of transparency, the 5,500 page of appendices and 700+ pages of the Study Report could be downloaded and printed off. Finding what went on in a clinical trial from paperwork like this is a bit like playing Memory – where there a bunch of cards with faces or plants or whatever turned face down and if you turn one up you have to remember where the matching face you turned up before is. It can be done with 5,500 pages printed off.

But playing Memory is much harder to do now with the new improved access GSK is offering.

If you apply to access a GSK trial now you are forced to submit an analytic plan which essentially stops an applicant from accessing any adverse events on the drug. Adverse events are the material the company tries hardest to hide.

Should you get access to the full set of appendices that contain company listings of adverse events, there is almost no way to play the Memory Game because access is through a remote desktop. It may be that a younger generation used to playing Digital Memory will be able to work the system, but it’s not easy. It takes multiple passwords to access the desktop. You are logged out regularly. And while on the desktop, GSK can monitor your every keystroke.

Nightmare in Harlow

But here’s the rub. To really nail down what’s going on, you need access to the approximately 70,000 pages of patient level data. Through a remote desktop this becomes a nightmare.

This scheme to deliver frustration cloaked in the appearances of transparency was devised several years ago. 

The history of the idea was outlined two years ago in May Fool’s Day. Last year the details of GSK’s scheme were outlined in April Fool in Harlow.

– See more at: http://davidhealy.org/welcome-to-troy/#comments

Neil1Neil2

 For more on The Ben Goldacre/GSK/Data Debacle See My Previous Posts Here:
https://truthman30.wordpress.com/tag/ben-goldacre/
mySuperLamePic_8743ffa68e2ea346cd518fc67a0f2f60
Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s