Seroxat Update February 2010


I haven’t updated this website  for a few months now, but in this post I’m going to blog about some of the more recent developments in the ongoing Seroxat Scandal.

It’s the beginning of the year 2010 and it is very difficult to believe that Seroxat is still on the market; after over a decade of bad press, litigation, birth defects and many hundreds of thousands of people suffering ill effects from this chemical poison- you would think that it would and should have been pulled by now… but no, it’s not only still being prescribed, but it also continues to harm..

Anyhow, here are some links to the recent Seroxat related news :

There is a new Seroxat resource web site which seems to have come online recently, it’s called BEAT SEROXAT and it’s worth checking out :

http://www.beatseroxat.com/

Bob Fiddaman, of the brilliant Seroxat Sufferers blog, has been writing about his experiences with the UK drug regulators and his tireless campaigning on behalf of those harmed from Seroxat. Not only has Bob’s campaigning been a hugely noble and brave endeavour , but also his work has proved the power of blogging as a way of bringing awareness to issues that affect everyone.  Bob has managed to find himself a publisher for his Seroxat related book and it looks like it’s going to be very interesting read indeed…

Here is a link to Bob’s Seroxat Book :

http://chipmunkapublishing.co.uk/shop/index.php?main_page=product_info&products_id=1558

also if you want to check out Bob’s Seroxat blog, go here :

http://fiddaman.blogspot.com/

There has been a flurry of news in relation to Seroxat’s effects on pregnant mothers and a string of successful lawsuits in America has resulted in litigation for GSK ..

I highlighted the potential for Seroxat to cause birth defects in baby rats when I set up this blog some years ago with this post :

https://truthman30.wordpress.com/2007/05/19/seroxat-link-10-paroxetine-womb-foetus-poisoning/

It is simply astounding (not to mention disturbing) how this drug is still on the market..

also, it’s quite amazing how ordinary people like myself , Bob and others have to bring attention to issues like Seroxat, where are the public health announcements and government intervention? One thing Is for certain, it may be too late for many poor babies born with birth defects from Seroxat and other SSRI drugs…

Check out Evelyn Pringle’s brilliant articles to learn more about the Paxil birth defect trials in the states :

http://yubanet.com/opinions/Evelyn-Pringle-Paxil-Birth-Defect-Litigation—First-Trial-A-Bust-For-Glaxo.php

On the subject of Birth defects relating to anti-depressant use in pregnancy , a very interesting case hit the headlines in Ireland recently  :

This from the Irish Times :

http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/ireland/2010/0210/1224264111936.html

Birth disability case settled with €500,000 payout

MARY CAROLAN

A SETTLEMENT of €500,000, plus legal costs, has been approved by the High Court against consultant psychiatrist Prof Patricia Casey and consultant obstetrician Dr Mary Holohan in the case of a child born with disabilities allegedly caused by prescription drugs taken by her psychiatrically ill mother during pregnancy.

The settlement in the case of Rebecca McGillin, now aged eight, is without admission of liability by either Prof Casey, practising out of of the Mater hospital, or Dr Holohan, practising out of the Rotunda Hospital.

They had denied all claims against them, including of negligence in their treatment of the child’s mother, Lisa McGillin, whose separate action also settled yesterday.

The court heard Ms McGillin had been treated by Prof Casey since 1994 and had been diagnosed with mild bipolar disorder and depression.

Her medication prior to and for certain periods during her pregnancy included Lithium, used as a mood stabiliser, and Epilim, an anti-convulsant primarily used to treat epilepsy but also used in the treatment of depression.

The active ingredient in Epilim is sodium valproate.

In proceedings that opened a week ago, it was alleged both doctors should have ensured Ms McGillin was taken off Lithium and Epilim in pregnancy. Ms McGillin became pregnant in July 2000 after being treated by Dr Holohan for about six months with a view to improving her fertility chances.

Ms McGillin was on both drugs before her pregnancy and also took both at some stages in her pregnancy, the court heard.

In evidence, Ms McGillin said she went off Lithium for most of the first trimester but resumed taking it before the end of that 12- week period because she had a relapse of her illness. She also said she ceased taking all drugs, including Epilim, after four months into her pregnancy, but that claim was disputed.

Approving the settlement of Rebecca McGillin’s case yesterday, the president of the High Court Mr Justice Nicholas Kearns described it as a “good” settlement and wished the child and her family well into the future.

The judge was told by Aongus Ó Brolcháin SC, for Rebecca, that the separate action by Ms McGillin against Prof Casey and Dr Holohan had also been settled without admission of liability and could be struck out with an order for taxation of Ms McGillin’s costs.

Mr Justice Kearns, who was approving the settlement, noted that Mr Justice John Quirke, who heard the case over four days, had made it clear there was no question of the mother being to blame.

The judge told Barry McGillin, father of Rebecca, that he had looked at the medical reports in the case and regarded the settlement as a good one which he was happy to approve. Rebecca was very lucky to have parents who were so devoted to her, he added. Mr McGillin said he was happy with the settlement as it protected Rebecca.

Rebecca, now living in Omagh, Co Tyrone, was born in April 2001 with a deformed hand, thin lips, problems with balance and other features of sodium valproate syndrome. She was described as a bright, cheerful, attractive little girl whose mental capacity is not affected by her condition and as being of above-average intelligence.

In the action brought on her behalf, it was alleged the injuries were a result of negligent treatment of her mother by Prof Casey and Dr Holohan relating to the medication prescribed for Ms McGillin.

In evidence, Ms McGillin said she had trusted both doctors, particularly Prof Casey, and was never advised by either to cease taking Epilim during pregnancy.

While agreeing she was advised by Prof Casey of certain risks from Lithium in the first trimester, she said she was told by both defendants any risk from Epilim would be negated by taking a high dose of folic acid.

The court was told that Prof Casey would say she had advised Ms McGillin, before and during her pregnancy, about the risks from certain drugs and had sent her documents to that effect in September 1998 and August 2000.

Prof Casey would also say she had advised Ms McGillin there were risks to herself should she cease her medication and risks to the foetus from the medication, her counsel, Murray McGrath SC, said.

The court also heard that Dr Holohan’s defence would be that she had outlined risks from both Epilim and Lithium, including risks of congenital heart defects, cleft palate and neural tube defects.

Both defendants strongly disputed the claim they had advised a high dose of folic acid would negate any risk from Epilim.

http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/ireland/2010/0203/1224263660153.html

A YOUNG girl suffered serious injuries at birth due to alleged negligence by psychiatrist Prof Patricia Casey and a consultant obstetrician Dr Mary Hol0han in the treatment of her mother before and during her pregnancy, it has been claimed at the High Court.

It is claimed that Rebecca McGillin, now aged eight, was exposed to a risk of injury as a result of alleged failure of the defendants to properly assess the nature and type of prescription drugs being taken before and after pregnancy by her mother Lisa Glynn McGillin, who, it is claimed was diagnosed by Prof Casey some years earlier as having mild bi-polar disorder.

It is claimed there was a failure to give any or any proper advice as to certain effects of those drugs, including the drug Epilim, which is primarily used to treat epilepsy but is also effective in treating depression.

Prof Casey, who allegedly treated Lisa McGillin since 1994, and consultant obstetrician Mary Holohan failed to ensure Lisa McGillin was counselled properly or at all in relation to her pregnancy in 2000 and failed to properly comunciate with each other about the management of the pregnancy, it is also claimed.

It is alleged both defendants, following the diagnosis of pregnancy, failed to stop the alleged high dosage of drugs being taken by Lisa McGillin and failed to properly monitor her and to assess the medication best suited to her needs.

Rebecca suffered serious injuries at birth on April 10th, 2001, as a result of the alleged negligence, it is alleged. The child was alleged to have suffered cognitive and motor injuries and to have features consistent with Fetal Valporoate Syndrome.

Among other claims is that an ultrasound scan performed on the child’s mother at 12 weeks on January 11th, 2001, revealed a flexion deformity and asymmetric growth retardation with a repeat scan on January 22nd confirming those findings.

Following the January 11th scan, it is claimed Lisa McGillin contacted Prof Casey saying she would not be able to cope with a handicapped baby.

It is alleged Prof Casey discussed the options with Ms McGillin and advised her she could terminate the pregnancy and could travel to England quite easily to have that procedure.

It is further claimed Ms McGillin again contacted Prof Casey three days later who allegedly advised Ms McGillin she would be too distressed to follow through with a termination of her pregnancy and it would bother her for the rest of her life if she did so.

The proceedings by Rebecca McGillin, suing through her father Barry McGillin, Gainsborough Avenue, Malahide, Co Dublin, opened yesterday before Mr Justice John Quirke.

The child’s case is against Prof Casey, a professor of psychiatry practising from the Mater Misercordiae Hospital, Dublin, and Dr Mary Holohan, a consultant obstetrician and gynaecologist practising from the private clinic, Rotunda Hospital, Dublin.

Separate proceedings by Lisa McGillin against the same defendants are listed for hearing later.

A YOUNG girl suffered serious injuries at birth due to alleged negligence by psychiatrist Prof Patricia Casey and a consultant obstetrician Dr Mary Hol0han in the treatment of her mother before and during her pregnancy, it has been claimed at the High Court.

It is claimed that Rebecca McGillin, now aged eight, was exposed to a risk of injury as a result of alleged failure of the defendants to properly assess the nature and type of prescription drugs being taken before and after pregnancy by her mother Lisa Glynn McGillin, who, it is claimed was diagnosed by Prof Casey some years earlier as having mild bi-polar disorder.

It is claimed there was a failure to give any or any proper advice as to certain effects of those drugs, including the drug Epilim, which is primarily used to treat epilepsy but is also effective in treating depression.

Prof Casey, who allegedly treated Lisa McGillin since 1994, and consultant obstetrician Mary Holohan failed to ensure Lisa McGillin was counselled properly or at all in relation to her pregnancy in 2000 and failed to properly comunciate with each other about the management of the pregnancy, it is also claimed.

It is alleged both defendants, following the diagnosis of pregnancy, failed to stop the alleged high dosage of drugs being taken by Lisa McGillin and failed to properly monitor her and to assess the medication best suited to her needs.

Rebecca suffered serious injuries at birth on April 10th, 2001, as a result of the alleged negligence, it is alleged. The child was alleged to have suffered cognitive and motor injuries and to have features consistent with Fetal Valporoate Syndrome.

Among other claims is that an ultrasound scan performed on the child’s mother at 12 weeks on January 11th, 2001, revealed a flexion deformity and asymmetric growth retardation with a repeat scan on January 22nd confirming those findings.

Following the January 11th scan, it is claimed Lisa McGillin contacted Prof Casey saying she would not be able to cope with a handicapped baby.

It is alleged Prof Casey discussed the options with Ms McGillin and advised her she could terminate the pregnancy and could travel to England quite easily to have that procedure.

It is further claimed Ms McGillin again contacted Prof Casey three days later who allegedly advised Ms McGillin she would be too distressed to follow through with a termination of her pregnancy and it would bother her for the rest of her life if she did so.

The proceedings by Rebecca McGillin, suing through her father Barry McGillin, Gainsborough Avenue, Malahide, Co Dublin, opened yesterday before Mr Justice John Quirke.

The child’s case is against Prof Casey, a professor of psychiatry practising from the Mater Misercordiae Hospital, Dublin, and Dr Mary Holohan, a consultant obstetrician and gynaecologist practising from the private clinic, Rotunda Hospital, Dublin.

Separate proceedings by Lisa McGillin against the same defendants are listed for hearing later.

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5 comments

  1. Larry Bone

    Successful lawsuits seem to be the only way to bring pressure on Glaxo and major mass media in the U.S. ignore these stories. It seems big money holds all this in place. It would be great if Sen. Grassley could thoroughly investigate Glaxo’s dealings with the FDA regarding Paxil and all money paid and where exactly it went to market Paxil. I’m not holding my breath waiting for this to happen.

  2. sandy

    What make this case interesting is the doctors are being sued not the drug company. I know when I have contacted lawyers about suing due to the effects of effexor and horrid protracted withdrawal the lawyers have asked me if who I hold responsible doctors or drug companies I said both. I have not found a lawyer willing to take my case. I am not the only one I talk on a lot of effexor sites many want to sue.

  3. truthman30

    People don’t think of suing their doctors with negligence in regards to drugs, but as far as i am aware, it’s much easier to get cases like that to court. They also have a more than reasonable chance of success, more people should do it.. also it might make those mad psychiatrists think again before they pump people full of the next medication that they get off their buddys in the pharmaceutical industry…

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