The US Department Of Justice Legal Complaint Against GSK (2012)


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http://www.quitam-lawyer.com/sites/quitam-lawyer.com/files/02.03.12%20-%20GSK%20–%207th%20Amended%20Complaint.pdf (GSK Dept of Justice Complaint)

Regular readers, and those interested in GSK, would likely be aware of the record breaking 3 Billion dollar fine which GSK had to pay the US justice department in 2012. The US justice department complaint which this fine is based on is absolutely huge, and the sheer scale of the abuses of ethics and morals which GSK were engaged in for many years is simply astounding. The full complaint can be viewed here, and at 243 pages, it’s quite a read, and I’m sure most readers won’t fail to be utterly appalled at the litany of charges contained within it.

However, according to some comments by an apparent whistleblower on my blog recently, this complaint should have been much wider in its scope, and should have been at least twice (or more) in its length of charges against GSK. It would be interesting to know why the department of Justice didn’t just go the whole hog and fine GSK on all the information which they had in their possession, why was the complaint supposedly much smaller than it should have been?

This blog is primarily about Paxil (Seroxat) because that is the drug which I was prescribed and it’s the drug that damaged me, therefore I find the information about Seroxat the most interesting, however, I also find it puzzling that the Paxil part of the complaint seems quite meager considering Seroxat/Paxil was one of Glaxo’s most notorious, particularly in the sense of the scandals, cover ups and controversy surrounding it.

Is there more about Paxil which should be in there? is there more about other drugs? or other fraudulent or unethical behavior? If so, where is that information? and how do we get access to it?

If anyone has any information regarding this, contact me on the e-mail provided.

truthman30@gmail.com

Thanks

paxil3p2P3



GSK1 GSK2 GSK3 GSK4 GSK5 GSK6 GSK7 GSK8 GSK9 GSK10 GSK11 GSK12

Parents Sue GlaxoSmithKline for Daughter’s Zofran Death


June 28, 2015, 08:00:00AM. By
Deertrail, CO: Amanda recently filed a product liability complaint against GlaxoSmithKline (GSK), the maker of Zofran, claiming the drug she used during pregnancy caused her son to be born with a birth defect.

Zofran Linked to Hypospadias Birth Defect, Mother Furious“My son was born with hypospadias, where the urethra forms abnormally and is not at the top of his penis,” says Amanda. “The urologist told me that it is a birth defect.” The urethra forms during weeks 8-14 of pregnancy: Amanda took Zofran to help treat morning sickness during her second trimester, which is from week 13 to the end of week 26.

The abnormal opening can form anywhere from just below the end of the penis to the scrotum, and there are different degrees of hypospadias; some can be minor and some more severe, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Amanda’s son required surgery when he was two months old to correct the problem but he still suffers from the birth defect.

“I don’t know if I can put my son through another surgery,” says Amanda. “I first noticed that his penis wasn’t normal after his circumcision – he wasn’t urinating properly. Now he is three years old and still having problems: he says it hurts. I’m scared about putting him through another surgery in case it doesn’t get corrected again. But I am getting a second opinion.”

When Amanda discovered last year that there was a link to Zofran and hypospadias, she was furious. “I cried so much, and the guilt is overwhelming. I am constantly dealing with this issue. You think that taking a drug is safe, especially for something ‘simple’ like morning sickness. Finding out the danger of this drug really is devastating, and very scary. And to top it off, I heard that the Zofran manufacturer was aware of Zofran birth defects yet didn’t recall it.”

In 2004, the medical journal An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology indicated a “possible” link between Zofran (ondansetron)] and hypospadias. The study noted that more studies are required and suggested that GSK lacked safety research on its drug. As well, the researchers said that “Despite the fact that it is not indicated, women are being prescribed this drug for the treatment of nausea and vomiting of pregnancy (NVP).”

“When my son pees, his penis points down at an angle. He has two holes, and urinates from one of them. He is a healthy boy except for this,” Amanda adds. “I didn’t take Zofran with my second child and he is fine. Thank god I didn’t have NVP with him, or maybe I was just able to handle the nausea better.

“I can’t believe there is a drug on the market that can harm innocent babies. I’d like to see that come off the shelf. I hope this message serves as a warning to pregnant women who are considering taking Zofran.” Add to Amanda’s warning, doctors who prescribe it.

The US Department of Justice in 2012 reached a $3 billion settlement with GSK after the government alleged the company promoted the off-label uses of several drugs, including Zofran.

All Four BBC Panorma Seroxat Documentaries Now Available To View Online…


All four of the BBC Panorama’s outstanding exposes of GSK’s ‘antidepressant’ Seroxat are now available to view online. The BBC’s investigation of Seroxat and GSK were unprecedented both in their scope and in the response which they received from the public. The first documentary, “The Secrets of Seroxat” from 2002 received tens of thousands of personal responses from people in England who had taken Seroxat and suffered frightening side effects such as aggression, personality changes, nightmares, withdrawal, suicidal and homicidal thoughts, suicide attempts (and in some cases self harm and completed suicides).

Personally I believe these documentaries are essential viewing for anyone who has been harmed by psychiatric drugs, SSRI’s, the pharmaceutical industry or psychiatry/doctors, and of course for those taking Seroxat. Just how far and how low would a drug company go to cover up dangerous side effects and protect its drug over patients health?

After ‘The Secrets of Seroxat”, the viewers response was so great that the BBC made a follow up documentary called “E-mails from the edge“. This documentary, is in some ways, even more disturbing, than the first one, as it contains many harrowing first hand accounts of GSK’s hideous ‘anti-depressant’.

The third documentary, “Taken on trust” focuses on the toothless regulator- the MHRA- and the various shenanigans relating to their involvement in the Seroxat scandal and the fourth, “Secrets of the drug trials” concentrates on GSK’s fraudulent Seroxat study (329) which led to many children being prescribed a drug which should never have been licensed.

http://www.veoh.com/watch/v251729w7zYxt2H (Link to Secrets Of The Drug Trials)

How Does Glaxo Get Away With Global Fraud, Corporate Manslaughter And General Skullduggery?


Maybe they get away with it because they literally (and legally) bribe almost everyone?..

Check out the millions GSK gives every year to doctors and researchers..

https://openpaymentsdata.cms.gov/company/100000005449

And after you have a look at that outrageous obscenity..

Have a look at GSK’s apology letter to the Chinese people for illegally bribing doctors in their country… bear in mind this is an apology to over one billion people… GSK don’t do things by halves do they?….

http://www.gsk.com/media/526041/gsk-statement-of-apology.pdf

GSKGSK3

Bob Fiddaman Exposes All The Dodgy Doctors Greedily Gobbling From The Big Pharma Trough


http://fiddaman.blogspot.ie/2015/07/warning-pharma-payments-may-give-you.html?spref=tw

Thursday, July 02, 2015

WARNING: Pharma Payments May Give You Worms!

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I now have access to the database that shows exactly how many Doctors GSK paid in 2014. I’ll be writing extensively about this over the coming weeks.

In the meantime, here’s a doctor who, it appears, either has some sort of binge eating disorder or has a bad case of worms.

DR. ROGER ABRAHAMS




His specialty is Allopathic & Osteopathic Physicians/Internal Medicine, Pulmonary Disease and he is based, according to the data, at 1265 Pineview Dr, Morgantown, WV 26505-2713

Here’s what GSK gave him for his food and beverages.

**Note how particularly peckish Dr Abrahams was on May 3**

GlaxoSmithKline Payments

FOOD & BEVERAGE
FOOD & BEVERAGE
FOOD & BEVERAGE
FOOD & BEVERAGE
FOOD & BEVERAGE
FOOD & BEVERAGE
FOOD & BEVERAGE
FOOD & BEVERAGE
FOOD & BEVERAGE
FOOD & BEVERAGE
FOOD & BEVERAGE
FOOD & BEVERAGE
FOOD & BEVERAGE
FOOD & BEVERAGE
FOOD & BEVERAGE
FOOD & BEVERAGE
FOOD & BEVERAGE
FOOD & BEVERAGE
FOOD & BEVERAGE
FOOD & BEVERAGE
FOOD & BEVERAGE
FOOD & BEVERAGE
FOOD & BEVERAGE
FOOD & BEVERAGE
FOOD & BEVERAGE
FOOD & BEVERAGE
FOOD & BEVERAGE
FOOD & BEVERAGE
FOOD & BEVERAGE
FOOD & BEVERAGE
1/27/2014
1/27/2014
2/25/2014
4/14/2014
4/21/2014
4/30/2014
5/2/2014
5/3/2014
5/3/2014
5/3/2014
5/3/2014
5/3/2014
5/4/2014
5/4/2014
5/4/2014
5/13/2014
6/6/2014
6/17/2014
6/17/2014
6/20/2014
7/28/2014
7/28/2014
8/11/2014
8/11/2014
8/18/2014
9/11/2014
12/2/2014
12/2/2014
12/11/2014
12/11/2014
$11.57
$1.20
$15.86
$13.05
$7.20
$23.85
$114.94
$17.73
$82.22
$60.81
$126.96
$15.71
$55.72
$49.37
$20.21
$93.40
$2.12
$1.03
$11.82
$47.85
$2.02
$9.58
$0.97
$8.56
$32.25
$13.85
$11.95
$2.85
$9.15
$0.43

And these were just payments from GSK.

Here’s what AstraZeneca paid him. He, it appears, really pushed the boat out on May 5, spending a total of $372 on food and beverages. That’s a fortnight’s groceries to the likes of your average person.

AstraZeneca Payments

Food and Beverage

Food and Beverage
Food and Beverage

Food and Beverage
Food and Beverage
Food and Beverage
Food and Beverage
Food and Beverage
Food and Beverage
02/06/14
3/5/2014
3/5/2014
5/5/2014
5/5/2014
5/5/2014
5/5/2014
6/25/2014
12/18/2014
$14.99
$1.71
$14.16
$55.98
$135.00
$117.17
$63.91
$11.45
$14.67

Next we have Boehringer Ingelheim…


Boehringer Ingelheim Payments

Food and Beverage
Food and Beverage
Food and Beverage
Food and Beverage
Food and Beverage
Food and Beverage
Food and Beverage
1/16/2014
5/21/2014
9/16/2014
10/8/2014
10/12/2014
12/10/2014
12/10/2014
$3.72
$11.46
$12.01
$12.01
$9.03
$40.64
$9.01

The there was Forest Pharmaceuticals…


Forest Pharmaceuticals Payments

Food and Beverage
Food and Beverage
Food and Beverage
Food and Beverage
Food and Beverage
Food and Beverage
Food and Beverage
Food and Beverage
Food and Beverage
Food and Beverage
Food and Beverage
Food and Beverage
Food and Beverage
Food and Beverage
1/22/2014
2/10/2014
2/28/2014
3/26/2014
4/1/2014
4/7/2014
4/21/2014
5/8/2014
5/19/2014
6/9/2014
6/24/2014
7/14/2014
7/30/2014
9/5/2014
$11.72
$1.50
$9.30
$19.63
$15.97
$15.67
$1.78
$2.64
$5.60
$2.29
$1.92
$8.89
$7.28
$5.01

Just a couple of dining expenses from Genentech USA, Inc.

Food and Beverage7/30/2014$7.28 and 9/5/2014  – $5.01

Next up, Meda Pharmaceuticals, Inc.


Meda Pharmaceuticals, Inc Payments

Food and Beverage
Food and Beverage
Food and Beverage
Food and Beverage
Food and Beverage
1/8/2014
5/14/2014
9/24/2014
10/20/2014
12/18/2014
$13.56
$12.90
$10.65
$11.65
$101.35

One from Merck Sharp & Dohme Corporation

Food and Beverage 11/19/2014$15.99

Mylan Specialty L.P. are next…

Food and Beverage 7/1/2014$17.58 and 7/1/2014 $1.76

Other minor one offs with other pharmaceutical companies, then Teva Pharmaceuticals USA, Inc

Teva Pharmaceuticals USA, Inc Payments

Food and Beverage
Food and Beverage
Food and Beverage
Food and Beverage
Food and Beverage
3/20/2014
4/8/2014
5/13/2014
8/27/2014
10/9/2014
$10.35
$12.34
$15.51
$11.23
$13.54

Quite an appetite, I’m sure you’ll agree.

Payments to Roger Abrahams didn’t end there. He was also paid travel expenses and, as we shall see, for other miscellaneous activities.

TRAVEL & LODGING PAYMENTS

Before the integrity agreement was signed by GlaxoSmithKline in the recent $3 billion whisleblower lawsuit, Glaxo reps would often make payments for travel expenses. Blair Hamrick, who, along with others, blew the whistle on GSK, told me, “Back in the day, doctors were given the choice on one first class airfare, or could trade in for two coach tickets on these trips. They would always opt for two tickets and bring someone. After we filed they stopped doing that. “ Blair also informed me that, “There was speculation that a lot of doctors would paddle their expenses, in as much as they would turn in receipts without actually buying anything, to get extra money.”

On the subject of food and beverages Blair told me, “Back when we filed the case, Doctors would always bring spouses or guests. It was like a fully paid vacation. Right after the case was filed, they changed the rules to say that it was Doctors only. I don’t know whether they are sticking to the rule or not these days.”

This, in no way implies that Dr. Roger Abrahams was doing this. I just thought I’d give the reader some background into what Glaxo reps did and what the doctors, back then, chose to do.

Here’s Dr Abraham’s travel and lodging expenses.

AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals LP

Travel and Lodging
Travel and Lodging
Travel and Lodging
Travel and Lodging
05/04/14
5/4/2014
5/5/2014
5/5/2014
$408.30
$1,115.22
$51.91
$78.71

Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
Travel and Lodging
12/10/14
$1,116.70

GlaxoSmithKline

Travel and Lodging

Travel and Lodging

Travel and Lodging
Travel and Lodging
Travel and Lodging
Travel and Lodging
3/28/2014
5/2/2014
5/2/2014
5/4/2014
5/7/2014
8/20/2014
$529.50
$335.26
$44.00
$16.43
$25.76
$44.24

CONSULTING FEES PAID BY

Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

1/28/2014 $150.00
3/2/2014      $682.50
3/26/2014 $1,000.00
3/26/2014 $4,000.00

GlaxoSmithKline

8/18/2014 $300.00

As always, I’ve saved the best until last.

The following falls under the vague category of…

“Compensation for services other than consulting, including serving as faculty or as a speaker at a venue other than a continuing education program.”

Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc. AND **Boehringer Ingelheim Pharma GmbH & Co.KG

Compensation
Compensation
Compensation
Compensation
Compensation
Compensation
Compensation
Compensation**
Compensation**
Compensation**
Compensation**
Compensation**
12/15/2014
12/15/2014
12/15/2014
12/15/2014
12/15/2014
12/15/2014
12/15/2014
7/7/2014
7/10/2014
9/8/2014
10/20/2014
10/30/2014
$490.00
$4,321.00
$1,212.00
$1,461.00
$490.00
$1,461.00
$490.00
$188.31
$175.00
$521.86
$1,469.93
$562.00

GlaxoSmithKline

Compensation
Compensation
Compensation
Compensation
Compensation
Compensation
05/05/14
6/4/2014
6/11/2014
6/17/2014
6/19/2014
9/15/2014
$1,300.00
$800.00
$800.00
$800.00
$1,300.00
$1,450.00

Over the coming weeks I’ll be dissecting the database even more.

I’m now off for a sandwich… paid for by myself.

Bob Fiddaman.

Action 9: Man waits years for money after $3 billion Avandia settlement


Updated: 7:51 p.m. Monday, Jan. 5, 2015 | Posted: 4:40 p.m. Monday, Jan. 5, 2015

Action 9: Man waits years for money after $3 billion Avandia settlement

Action 9: Man waits years for money after $3 billion Avandia settlement photo
Action 9: Man waits years for money after $3 billion Avandia settlement

By Jason Stoogenke

It was one of the biggest drug settlements in U.S. history.

The drug company paid all of the money. But, years later, one local man, Terry Tribble, says he still hasn’t seen a dime. 

“My God, what happens if I(die) while waiting on them to sign a paper and issue the money?”  Tribble said.

Glaxo SmithKline (GSK) agreed to pay more than $3 billion for problems caused by the diabetes drug Avandia. Patients claimed that the drug increased their risk of heart problems and stroke. Thousands sued, including the federal government and more than 45 states.

GSK settled for $3 billion with the federal government. It agreed in November 2012 to pay $90 million to North Carolina and 37 other states. It settled for $229 million with South Carolina and seven other states in July 2013. GSK also settled private lawsuits. Those terms are confidential.

GSK said it “settled these matters to avoid the expense and uncertainty of protracted litigation and trial. The company did not admit to any wrongdoing or liability of any kind under these state laws in this settlement.”

Tribble said he lived with diabetes for close to two decades. “You just live in constant fear of: Are you going to live today? Are you going to live tomorrow?” he said.

Then came Avandia. He said the drug worked wonders. But, then, he claimed, he started having heart problems. 

GSK put the settlement money in escrow. Since then, it’s been up to various resolution groups to distribute the pot accordingly. But Tribble said he hasn’t seen any of the money.

“They just keep putting it [off], putting it [off], putting it [off],” he said.

Action 9 contacted the Ohio-based resolution group handling Tribble’s claim. Because of privacy reasons, it won’t say if he’s entitled to part of the money. In fact, under the Avandia settlement, it couldn’t even say how many people are still waiting or when they can expect a payout.

Even though GSK has paid the money and is no longer part of the process, it did exchange a number of emails with Action 9. The company said:

“The principal reason funds may remain in escrow is that the courts have required that a portion of the funds be paid to certain health insurers who provided coverage to settling claimants. GSK must rely on the claimants and their attorneys, who often engage lien resolution administrators, to identify and inform the appropriate health insurers of the existence of the settlements and to negotiate an agreement concerning the precise portion of each claimant’s settlement that will be received by the claimant’s insurer.  The process of resolving the insurers’ claims can be time consuming, although note that GSK is not a part of this process. GSK’s interest is only that settlement proceeds get distributed accurately.”

Avandia remains on the market.

Boy, 12, left disabled by his swine flu jab wins £120,000 compensation payout after three-year legal battle by his family


Boy, 12, left disabled by his swine flu jab wins £120,000 compensation payout after three-year legal battle by his family

  • The vaccine triggered debilitating narcolepsy that has ruined the boy’s life
  • Opens the door for 100 more families who believe the jab caused problems
  • Others lost jobs and dropped out of university due to the sleeping disease 

A young boy left severely disabled by the swine flu vaccine has been awarded £120,000 in damages after a three-year legal battle by his family.

Lawyers for the 12-year-old successfully argued that the vaccine had triggered debilitating narcolepsy in the boy.

He has only one friend, struggles in school and may never be able to drive as a result.

Devastating: The impact of the vaccine has ruined the lives of those who suffered narcolepsy as a result

Devastating: The impact of the vaccine has ruined the lives of those who suffered narcolepsy as a result

The Government had insisted the rare sleeping disorder ‘was not serious enough’ for compensation to be paid.

But the illness has left the boy, whose family asked to remain anonymous, unable to get the bus or even shower by himself, according to a report in the Guardian.

The ruling open the doors for compensation claims from 100 other families who believe their children were affected by the jab.

The Pandemrix vaccine was administered to six million people in the UK during the swine flu outbreak of 2009 and 2010. Scientists now believe it triggered narcolepsy – a rare life-long brain disorder which sees the sufferer fall asleep in random locations at inappropriate times – in a handful of cases..

Other alleged victims have lost their jobs and dropped out of university after the disease made daily life unbearable.

Peter Todd, the solicitor for the boy’s family, told The Guardian: ‘They felt quite insulted to have their condition basically dismissed as something quite trivial.

‘They are incredibly needy. Some have lost their jobs, dropped out of university or seen their marriages break down as a result.’

Mr Todd is representing 74 other families who believe they have been affected in the same way.

The upper tribunal heard that the child’s extreme tiredness had made him ‘disruptive’ at school and unable to socialise with his peers.

A similar case is being brought by the family of Mathilda Crisp, who was just three years-old when she got the jab.

Mathilda was the youngest known person in the world to be diagnosed with the sleeping disorder.

Her mother Claire is seeking compensation from the government after the little girl started suffering terrifying nocturnal hallucinations and excruciating pain.

Claire, 44, a former NHS physiotherapist, thought she was playing safe when she had Mathilda vaccinated.

Cure: It was introduced to save children from the impact of swine flu but had an unexpected effect on some

Cure: It was introduced to save children from the impact of swine flu but had an unexpected effect on some

Doctors had suggested her daughter could be at particular risk from respiratory trouble from swine flu because she was born with a minor throat condition, laryngomalacia, which obstructs breathing. Children normally grow out of it by three.

‘We took the swine flu risk seriously since Mathilda had only recently outgrown laryngomalacia,’ says Claire, who also has a son, Elliot, and another daughter, Liberty.

But Mathilda’s first troubling symptoms developed within two weeks of the jab.

Her sleep became disturbed, leaving her exhausted in the day. Then she began to suffer from hallucinations at night, thinking there were demons in her bedroom.

Within six months, Claire and her husband Oliver, a professor of theology, were housebound caring for Mathilda. She was taken to a children’s hospital for what Claire calls ‘a series of failed visits’.

Initially, doctors thought she had a brain tumour, but after tests they ruled that out. ‘The doctors quickly wrote us off as an anxious mother and a pain-in-the-a*** child.’

The family was being referred to a psychiatric unit when a locum doctor from India diagnosed narcolepsy, which normally appears at around the age of 15.

Stanford University in California finally confirmed a diagnoses of narcolepsy based on blood samples sent to them.

Last night the Department of Health declined to comment on the case.

A spokesman for the Department of Work and Pensions said: ‘The Vaccine Damage Payments Scheme provides support in very rare cases where someone has become severely disabled as a result of immunisation against certain diseases. Decisions on claims take into account the individual circumstances of each case and the latest available medical evidence.’

He added that they do not comment on individual cases.